Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Volovsky
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Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Volovsky » Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:00 pm

Dear forum,

I'm looking for recommendations on books (both fiction and non-fiction) about death and psychological and physical phenomena around it, but with as little as possible (preferably non at all) religious/philosophical issues. Good if the book gives a sense of urgency.

To give a better impression of what I'm looking for: I have read so far (and can recommend):
1. Tolstoy "Death of Ivan Ilyich": a brilliant and vivid account of death in its many aspects: inevitability, loneliness, pain, despair, realization how the whole life was wasted for nothing etc, etc.
2. S. Nuland "How we die": written by a doctor, gives an accurate description of what actually happens during the death due to the most common causes: cancer, heart attack, suicide, murder, old age, etc.

Any other suggestions?

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Sam Vara
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Sam Vara » Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:49 pm

Mary Roach wrote a book called "Stiff", about the physical aspects of bodies after death. The chemical processes of decomposition and putrefaction, the uses of dead bodies in research, dissection, etc., and our treatment of the corpses in funeral homes. Very readable and wryly humorous.

rightviewftw
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by rightviewftw » Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:59 pm

I don't have a title suggestion but i know it was heavily practiced in Roman Catholicism in medieval times. They also built all those crazy, uhm, that;
Image
the practice of Memento mori (Latin: "remember (that) you will die")[2] is the medieval Latin Christian theory and practice of reflection on mortality, especially as a means of considering the vanity of earthly life and the transient nature of all earthly goods and pursuits. It is related to the ars moriendi ("The Art of Dying") and similar Western literature.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memento_mori
afaik monks and nuns used to greet eachother with something like "remember u will die brother/sister"
How to meditate: Anapanasati, Satipatthana.
Intro to General Semantics
Factors & Perceptions

Parallel Dhammapada Reading
Chinese to Eng Dhp
"The statements; 'With the remainderless stopping & fading of the six contact-media is it the case that there is anything else?' '.. is it the case that there is not anything else .. is it the case that there both is & is not anything else .. is it the case that there neither is nor is not anything else?' objectify non-objectification. However far the six contact-media go, that is how far objectification goes."

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Volovsky
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Volovsky » Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:23 pm

Sam Vara wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:49 pm
Mary Roach wrote a book called "Stiff", about the physical aspects of bodies after death. The chemical processes of decomposition and putrefaction, the uses of dead bodies in research, dissection, etc., and our treatment of the corpses in funeral homes. Very readable and wryly humorous.
Thanks! I've heard about this book, but now will look closer into it.

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Volovsky
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Volovsky » Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:28 pm

rightviewftw wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:59 pm
I don't have a title suggestion but i know it was heavily practiced in Roman Catholicism in medieval times. They also built all those crazy, uhm, that;
Thanks! I haven't thought in this direction. Considering how important it was for them they must have produced something readable and with sense of urgency. I will look into it.

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Coëmgenu
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Coëmgenu » Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:01 pm

This monk is dead to the world:
Image
His vestments hide his body, replaced as it is with outward symbols of the instruments of the passion, the devices used to kill Jesus.
如無為,如是難見、不動、不屈、不死、無漏、覆蔭、洲渚、濟渡、依止、擁護、不流轉、離熾焰、離燒然、流通、清涼、微妙、安隱、無病、無所有、涅槃。
Like this is the uncreated, like this is that which is difficult to realize, with no moving, no bending, no dying. Utterly lacking secretions and smothered in the dark, it is the island shore. Where there is ferrying, it is the crossing. It is dependency's ceasing, it is the end of circulating transmissions. It is the exhaustion of the flame, it is the ending of the burning. Flowing openly, pure and cool, with secret subtlety, and calm occultation, lacking ailment, lacking owning, nirvāṇa.
Asaṁskṛtadharmasūtra, Sermon on the Uncreated Phenomenon, T99.224b7, Saṁyuktāgama 890

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Zom
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Zom » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:33 pm

This monk is dead to the world
Is it him in the background? 8-)


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Coëmgenu
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Re: Maraṇasati in non-buddhist literature

Post by Coëmgenu » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:57 pm

I wanted to respond to you, Zom, but I was unsure of how to do so politely.

The clip you shared of orthodox Eastern Europe reminded me of accounts of naked śramaṇa, like Kassapa as attested to in SN41.9, and ascetics to acted like dogs, attested to in sources like DN 24, who sometimes apparently "die of flatulence", my favourite EBT quote.

I mean this in reference to the man on all-fours in the video clip that you shared.
如無為,如是難見、不動、不屈、不死、無漏、覆蔭、洲渚、濟渡、依止、擁護、不流轉、離熾焰、離燒然、流通、清涼、微妙、安隱、無病、無所有、涅槃。
Like this is the uncreated, like this is that which is difficult to realize, with no moving, no bending, no dying. Utterly lacking secretions and smothered in the dark, it is the island shore. Where there is ferrying, it is the crossing. It is dependency's ceasing, it is the end of circulating transmissions. It is the exhaustion of the flame, it is the ending of the burning. Flowing openly, pure and cool, with secret subtlety, and calm occultation, lacking ailment, lacking owning, nirvāṇa.
Asaṁskṛtadharmasūtra, Sermon on the Uncreated Phenomenon, T99.224b7, Saṁyuktāgama 890

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