What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths - what can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Sam Vara
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Re: What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Post by Sam Vara » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:52 pm

binocular wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 8:19 pm
Sam Vara wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:08 am
I don't have any such conviction that precepts and practices are "the highest, the most important there is, or sufficient". I'm just pointing out that virtue is something conceptually separable from other path factors, just like the Buddha did.
Of course they can be conceptually separated. I'm saying that such a separation, while ignoring doctrine, is unwise (and the Buddha didn't separate while ignoring doctrine). Separating like that, one might end up in a cult.
Insisting that such a separation is wise or useful, and ignoring doctrine, that is a case of silabbata-paramsa.
Nobody is ignoring doctrine. Both Mike and I raised it in this thread. Having said what I had to say about doctrine, I've spent the last few posts talking about virtue. Which, as I might have mentioned, is not doctrine.

Unfortunately, however, even discussions as fruitful as this one must come to an end, in this case because my wife's Easter celebrations mean that I will be working hard tomorrow, and then be away on holiday.

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mikenz66
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Re: What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Post by mikenz66 » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:17 am

J.Krishnamurti discussion moved here:
viewtopic.php?f=16&t=31576#p465667

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Mike

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mikenz66
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Re: What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Post by mikenz66 » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:28 am

binocular wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 8:19 pm
Sam Vara wrote:
Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:08 am
I don't have any such conviction that precepts and practices are "the highest, the most important there is, or sufficient". I'm just pointing out that virtue is something conceptually separable from other path factors, just like the Buddha did.
Of course they can be conceptually separated. I'm saying that such a separation, while ignoring doctrine, is unwise (and the Buddha didn't separate while ignoring doctrine). Separating like that, one might end up in a cult.
Insisting that such a separation is wise or useful, and ignoring doctrine, that is a case of silabbata-paramsa.
This would, indeed, be the case, if these other religious practitioners were not developing wholesome qualities. However, I don't think that is always the case:
Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote: To the extent that a religion proposes sound ethical principles and can promote to some degree the development of wholesome qualities such as love, generosity, detachment and compassion, it will merit in this respect the approbation of Buddhists. These principles advocated by outside religious systems will also conduce to rebirth in the realms of bliss — the heavens and the divine abodes. Buddhism by no means claims to have unique access to these realms, but holds that the paths that lead to them have been articulated, with varying degrees of clarity, in many of the great spiritual traditions of humanity. While the Buddhist will disagree with the belief structures of other religions to the extent that they deviate from the Buddha's Dhamma, he will respect them to the extent that they enjoin virtues and standards of conduct that promote spiritual development and the harmonious integration of human beings with each other and with the world.
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/aut ... ay_24.html
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Mike

binocular
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Re: What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Post by binocular » Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:00 pm

mikenz66 wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:28 am
This would, indeed, be the case, if these other religious practitioners were not developing wholesome qualities. However, I don't think that is always the case:
Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote: To the extent that a religion proposes sound ethical principles and can promote to some degree the development of wholesome qualities such as love, generosity, detachment and compassion, it will merit in this respect the approbation of Buddhists. These principles advocated by outside religious systems will also conduce to rebirth in the realms of bliss — the heavens and the divine abodes. Buddhism by no means claims to have unique access to these realms, but holds that the paths that lead to them have been articulated, with varying degrees of clarity, in many of the great spiritual traditions of humanity. While the Buddhist will disagree with the belief structures of other religions to the extent that they deviate from the Buddha's Dhamma, he will respect them to the extent that they enjoin virtues and standards of conduct that promote spiritual development and the harmonious integration of human beings with each other and with the world.
https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/aut ... ay_24.html
Respecting them to the extent being the operative term.

auto
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Re: What is the Dark Night of the Soul in Buddhist terms?

Post by auto » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:41 am

dark night, widely used in dharmaoverground webpage.

When to practice a lot then 'dark night' is sure thing to come. And after it is gone then next circle it comes again and again next circle ..

Basically if you practice you start see things and they repeat and can name them. So there is a path written down, with all sorts of tips, it makes your bypassing much shorter if you know the pitfalls or where you overlook something and where you should focus on. So it is useful to tag along with these communities who practice and write down notes.

As some users here already pointed or hinted.

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