Page 2 of 2

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:05 am
by binocular
The "I don't have to explain myself because I'm so advanced, and you're just too dumb to understand" fallacy.
I can't think of a suitable Pali reference just yet.

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:37 am
by binocular
The Lady Vedehika fallacy: "You are free to ditch Buddhist principles when dealing with people you don't like, while all along considering yourself a good Buddhist."

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:42 am
by Dhammanando
binocular wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:05 am
The "I don't have to explain myself because I'm so advanced, and you're just too dumb to understand" fallacy.
I can't think of a suitable Pali reference just yet.
It's a bit long.

Atimānissa ekaṃsavibhajjapaṭipucchābyākaraṇīyapañhaṃ ṭhapanaṃ vā mūgasūkarova tuṇhībhavanaṃ vā vippaṭipatti.

“The fallacy that consists in a conceited person's setting aside of a question that merits either a direct answer, an analytical answer, or an answer with a counter-question, or else his remaining silent [in response to the question] like a dumb pig.”

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:49 am
by binocular
:bow:
I'll quote you on that!

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:06 pm
by davidbrainerd
DNS wrote:
Thu Oct 16, 2014 2:17 am
Bhikkhuification of upasakas, upasikas fallacy – The tendency to expect lay people to behave like monks, that they cannot enjoy music, cannot have sexual relations, etc., i.e., that they must follow the Patimokkha.
This is not a fallacy if their goal is to reach enlightenment in one shot rather than just make merit for a future life. The fallacy is the notion you're gonna become the next Buddha while having sex, so prevalent in Secular Buddhism where enlightenment means having a better sex life apparently.

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:51 pm
by ieee23
DNS wrote:
Thu Oct 16, 2014 2:17 am
Palenglish (Pali-English hybridized words) terms

The current discussion regarding Buddhist faith and other recent topics on jhanas and sotapannas has inspired me to make a list of some potentially new Palenglish logical fallacies:

Arahantification of sotapannas fallacy (courtesy of retrofuturist) – The tendency to insist that sotapannas must have most or all the characteristics of arahants. The sotapanna has eradicated only the first 3 hindrances to enlightenment; not all 10.

Bhikkhuification of upasakas, upasikas fallacy – The tendency to expect lay people to behave like monks, that they cannot enjoy music, cannot have sexual relations, etc., i.e., that they must follow the Patimokkha.

The Maha-Moggallanification of jhanas fallacy – The expectation that the jhanas are almost impossible to attain and that one must virtually fly through the air or any talk of jhanas is delusion and not real.

The Bahiyafication of practice fallacy – On the other extreme, believing that one can attain enlightenment in the first 5 minutes of becoming a Buddhist, disregarding the eons of preparation Bahiya is said to have accumulated.

The Kalmanizing effect fallacy – The belief that the Kalama Sutta makes Buddhism the most rational religion and that there are no mythological elements of any kind within Buddhist teachings.

Nivarana=Nirvana fallacy – The tendency to confuse nivarana (hindrances) with nirvana; thinking that one must embrace sense desires and extreme skepticism to reach the goal. (They are only spelled similarly; they are not the same.)

Paramatthizing language fallacy – The use of writing in riddles and non-dualistic terms in attempt to appear wise or enlightened, while really not knowing what the hell they are even saying; usually followed by the wise Taoist smilie at the end.

:sage:
This is very funny, as well as useful.

The last one explains almost everything I have heard from college students who are into Zen.

Re: Palenglish fallacies

Posted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 2:15 am
by samseva
Subha-Romanticization of Buddhism/Nibbāna
Viewing the teachings and Nibbāna as romantic and nearly impossible goals. Usually accompanied by highly poetic/Zen-like and elaborate language, misinterpretations, false similes and/or over-complication of simple teachings.