Objection to the Views of Venerable Analayo

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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DooDoot
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Re: Satipatthana: The direct path to realization

Post by DooDoot » Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:33 am

Dmytro wrote:
Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:04 pm
The forementioned Maha-cattarisaka sutta (MN 117) says, for example:

"One tries to abandon wrong view & to enter into right view: This is one's right effort. One is endowed with remembrance (sato) to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right remembrance (sati). Thus these three qualities — right view, right effort, & right remembrance (sati) — run & circle around right view."

So samma-sati has an exact purpose: to remember to abandon the unskillful and enter & remain in skillful. And these skillful and unskillful ways of behaviour may extend beyond those mentioned in the Satipatthana sutta.
The Satipatthana Sutta appears to say the role of mindfulness is to abandon covetousness & distress so the mind does not cling to anything in the world therefore Satipatthana appears the same as MN 117.

Saengnapha
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Re: Satipatthana: The direct path to realization

Post by Saengnapha » Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:07 am

DooDoot wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 2:33 am
Dmytro wrote:
Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:04 pm
The forementioned Maha-cattarisaka sutta (MN 117) says, for example:

"One tries to abandon wrong view & to enter into right view: This is one's right effort. One is endowed with remembrance (sato) to abandon wrong view & to enter & remain in right view: This is one's right remembrance (sati). Thus these three qualities — right view, right effort, & right remembrance (sati) — run & circle around right view."

So samma-sati has an exact purpose: to remember to abandon the unskillful and enter & remain in skillful. And these skillful and unskillful ways of behaviour may extend beyond those mentioned in the Satipatthana sutta.
The Satipatthana Sutta appears to say the role of mindfulness is to abandon covetousness & distress so the mind does not cling to anything in the world therefore Satipatthana appears the same as MN 117.
Since all dhammas are impermanent, including skillful ways, states of mind, and attainments, there is no position in which to rest one's intellect on/in.

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DooDoot
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Re: Satipatthana: The direct path to realization

Post by DooDoot » Sun Feb 18, 2018 7:05 am

Saengnapha wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:07 am
Since all dhammas are impermanent, including skillful ways, states of mind, and attainments, there is no position in which to rest one's intellect on/in.
I have not read the Pali suttas declare "all dhammas are impermanent".
Sabbe saṅkhārā aniccā'ti yadā paññāya passati. Atha nibbindati dukkhe esa maggo visuddhiyā.

Sabbe saṅkhārā dukkhā'ti yadā paññāya passati. Atha nibbindati dukkhe esa maggo visuddhiyā.

Sabbe dhammā anattā'ti yadā paññāya passati. Atha nibbindati dukkhe esa maggo visuddhiyā.

277. "All conditioned things are impermanent" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

278. "All conditioned things are unsatisfactory" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

279. "All things are not-self" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .budd.html
The Pali suttas appear to say the mind's refuge in Nibbana does not fluctuate:
His release, being founded on truth, does not fluctuate, for whatever is deceptive is false; Nibbana — the undeceptive — is true. Thus a monk so endowed is endowed with the highest determination for truth, for this — Nibbana, the undeceptive — is the highest noble truth.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

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