Criticism of Islam

A place to bring a contemplative / Dharmic perspective and opinions to current events and politics.
SarathW
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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by SarathW » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:44 pm

The original article posted on this thread is superficial & often in error thus will probably add more fuel to the fire rather than help.
Agree.
The biggest problem today is that we trying to solve the present problem with the baggage of the past.
What we should talk about is not what happened thousand years ago.
We should look at the world today and see what is happening around us.
Stay in the present moment.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

DooDoot
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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by DooDoot » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:01 pm

SarathW wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:44 pm
We should look at the world today and see what is happening around us.
We should define the true essence or message of each religion to stop the misuse of religion.

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Dharmasherab
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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Dharmasherab » Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:07 pm

DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 pm
The above seems to be a rather bizarre, illogical & contradictory sentence. If the Islamic world during the Middle ages was developed more than Europe at that time, as admitted, then which other civilization was the pinnacle or world civilisation and wealth?



If you take a wider view of history throughout the ages and compare historical civilisation it is obvious that Islamic Empire (whatever that means) is not the pinnacle of the world civilisation of wealth. There had been plenty of various different empires which were far more successful than the 'Islamic Empire'.
DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 pm
Regardless, the post is an irrelevant reply to what I posted, which was about how the Islamic Empire was taken over by very violent people due its wealth. The point of my post was to explain it was not really Muslims who attacked Buddhism in India but often ex-Buddhists.


No actually it was relevant because it just disproves the statement that the Islamic Empire was the pinnacle of the world civilisation which is false. Yes it was important at that specific time but clearly it was not 'the' pinnacle or any kind of pinnacle. Its best to read actual history rather than propaganda.
DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 pm
Dharmasherab wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 4:13 pm
Myths of Islam: Islam Facilitated the Golden Age of Scientific Discovery

First, the Muslim world benefited greatly from the Greek sciences, which were translated for them by dhimmi Christians and Jews. To their credit, Muslims did a better job of preserving Greek text than did the Europeans of the time, and this became the foundation for their own knowledge. (Although one large reason is that access by Christians to this part of their world was cut off by Muslim slave ships and coastal raids that dominated the Mediterranean during this period).

Secondly, many of the scientific advances credited to Islam were actually “borrowed” from other cultures conquered by the Muslims. The algebraic concept of “zero”, for example, is erroneously attributed to Islam when it was, in fact, a Hindu discovery that was merely introduced to the West by Muslims
.
The above quote is more illogical non-sense & something written by a mind without any Buddha-Dhamma. The mind of Buddha-Dhamma discerns cause & effect and, when appropriate, has a sense of gratitude towards cause & effect. When read with a mind of Buddha-Dhamma (truth discerning wisdom) rather than with a mind of Bodhicitta (lust & intrusiveness to convert all beings to Buddhism), the following is discerned from the above quote:


Actually it is not illogical. Its is just saying that these things were not invented or discovered but instead they were inherited in some way or another when the Islamic Empire expanded. Its a no-brainer. Of course people can show gratitude that efforts were made to preserve what was borrowed which otherwise could have got lost. But this does not mean we have exaggerate their importance by falsifying history where ‘borrowers’ are seen to be the actual ‘inventors’.

Bodhicitta does not mean lust. It means being compassionate towards other beings such as saving them from Samsaric dangers. The will of Buddha to teach other beings and encourage his followers to explain the Dhamma to others is also by an act of compassion. Such an act motivated by compassion should not be mistaken for mundane desires like lust.

DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:41 pm
The article is so ignorant it contradicts itself because it affirms the Muslims did not destroy science, Christians, Jews & others.


Actually the article makes a fair analysis of what actually happened against the typical propaganda where it is portrayed where the Islamic Empire as the 'Inventor'. The article just shows that the Islamic Empire just inherited whatever the knowledge which was there in its conquered territories for the most part. That is good enough. But this does not mean that it necessary for people to pander to propaganda and confidently say that "Islamic Empire was the pinnacle of World Civilisation".

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Dharmasherab » Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:19 pm

DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:30 pm
When a Muslim, via ignorance, says: "Allah commands us to kill all infidels"; we should be able to reply: "No, the Koran does not say this; and the original Muslims did not believe or act like this".


Offensive jihad is mandated in 19 different parts of the Quran. Therefore the above statement is incorrect and is false.

Qur'an, Hadith and Scholars:Offensive Fighting Mandated

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Dharmasherab » Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:40 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:03 pm
Putting the link how here makes it seem as if you mean to imply that Islamic civilizations have contributed quite literally nothing new, which is statistically impossible. That is like saying Rome didn't invent anything. These societies inherited/conquered most of the Roman Empire. That inventiveness didn't stop with Muslim rulers, before or after the majority populations in these regions converted from Christianity.

Perhaps you should have included something of the context to that article before posting it as a universal truth concerning the legitimacy of all inventions ascribed to Muslim inventors?


This is why also included in that same post the article 'Setting the Record Straight: The Non-Miracle of Islamic Science' where it fairly explains out what is commonly claimed as inventions where which ones were the actual inventions whiles which ones were inherited.

Setting the Record Straight: The Non-Miracle of Islamic Science

Coëmgenu wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:03 pm
Furthermore, the text itself that the article addresses is not about claims of scientific discoveries predicted by the Qur'an. Nothing in the article is relevant to the blurb you wrote above it here:
Whiles the Islamic world during the Middle ages was developed more than Europe at that time, it is also incorrect and a gross exaggeration to say that the Islamic Empire was the pinnacle or world civilisation and wealth. Also as a further note the actual teachings of Islam did not really have anything to do with whatever progress in science or technology at that time. Actually there is content in the Koran which contradicts basic science.
If you were posting it because it proves that the Qur'an contradicts "science" (as if a text written at such a time could be considered even vaguely scientific.

Buddhism believes in Sumeru, a geocentric flat earth cosmology with a cosmic mountain, if we want to be that pedantic and literal. Hardly more scientific IMO than the cosmic world-tree Yggdrasil. This did not prevent Buddhists, as well as Muslims, from determining independently of each other that the world was round.


Yes the article is more oriented about whether these things were invented or inherited and not about the content in the Quran. But the idea of 'Islamic Empire during the Middle ages was the key to modern science' is extrapolated from this and sometimes used as propaganda where the meaning of Quranic verses are adjusted to fit modern science. Its just a way of showing that even the science that was inherited and developed - the Islamic teachings didnt have much to do with that. People can misunderstand when statements like 'Islam was the pinnacle of World Civilisation' to mistakenly think that the actual Islamic teachings had science in it.

Lets take a hypothetical example. Lets say that a group of Buddhists went around claiming that 'Buddhist civilisation led to the improvement of scientific discovery'. It is important to note that the actual content in the Buddhist teachings may not have had any influence with respect to those inventions/discoveries. Because people can misunderstand and read too much into these things. Therefore it is best to clarify any misconception before they start to take a strong-hold.

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by DooDoot » Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:54 am

Dharmasherab wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:07 pm
No actually it was relevant because it just disproves the statement that the Islamic Empire was the pinnacle of the world civilisation which is false. Yes it was important at that specific time but clearly it was not 'the' pinnacle or any kind of pinnacle. Its best to read actual history rather than propaganda.
Irrelevant. The article posted in the OP is about how 'Muslims attacked Buddhists in India in around 1000BC'. My point was the Islamic Empire was plundered by non-Muslims, who then became Muslims, who then attacked India. This is an extremely important point. The Mongols who destroyed the Buddhist universities in India were often originally (Mahayana) Buddhists.


Actually it is not illogical. Its a no-brainer.
Irrelevant, again. The relevant matter is Islam originally embraced the world sciences, including Buddhists sciences, who all converged on Baghdad.
Bodhicitta does not mean lust. It means being compassionate towards other beings such as saving them from Samsaric dangers. The will of Buddha to teach other beings and encourage his followers to explain the Dhamma to others is also by an act of compassion. Such an act motivated by compassion should not be mistaken for mundane desires like lust.
Wrong. The Pali suttas literally say Dhamma is only taught to those who wish for it (AN 9.5). The idea of Bodhicitta is alien to the Pali suttas, which is why the Buddha did not each it. The Buddha said in many places he would not save all sentient beings.
Actually the article makes a fair analysis
Try to not be attached to opinions. You posted your opinion, I posted my opinion, that is enough. No need to post our opinions again. The article was clearly illogical because the article sought to attack Islam but actually showed Islam is a positive light. Thanks
Dharmasherab wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:19 pm
Offensive jihad is mandated in 19 different parts of the Quran. Therefore the above statement is incorrect and is false.

Qur'an, Hadith and Scholars:Offensive Fighting Mandated
I imagine the quotes at the link are out of context because both the Koran & actual Islamic history show the People of the Book (Christians & Jews) and other religious groups were permitted to practise their religion. I think my point here shows how ridiculous the above link is.





All I know as real & true is Islam will have so many more followers than Mahayana Buddhism now & in the future because Mahayana Buddhism could not even save Tibet, let alone save all sentient beings with Bodhicitta. The Dalai Lama had to run away, self-cherishing, in disguise in a military uniform (abandoning the robes) to save himself & left the Tibetan people at the hands of the Chinese (to save them from the feudal Tibetan slavery). Many Tibetans resorted to violence rather than to Buddhism. The Dalai Lama appeared to take refuge in the CIA rather than in the Buddha-Dhamma. :roll:
In the meantime, the CIA had begun assisting the Tibetan guerrillas, leading to their training in Okinawa and Colorado. The first operatives, with radios and weapons, had already been parachuted into Tibet and were making their way towards Lhasa. This operation has been discussed in publications by CIA agents who were in charge but never entered Tibet. Li does not mention that the operation was later aborted, as published CIA sources have long admitted, when the Nixon administration, determined to placate Mao, abruptly abandoned the guerrillas.

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2016/10/how ... t-in-1959/
:rofl:

The 14th Dalai Lama was financially supported by the CIA between the late 1950s and the mid 1970s, receiving $180,000 dollars per annum. :mrgreen:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIA_Tibetan_program

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by lyndon taylor » Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:02 am

I think you're mostly right about Muslims DooDoot, but I should say Muslims were more intolerant of idolaters than they were Jews and Christians which at the time at least did not practice idolatry. That being said how did India end up 80% idolatrous Hindus if Muslims had taken over and exterminated them, it doesn't make sense, obviously Muslims and Hindus have lived side by side in India for over 1000 years.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

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Kusala
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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Kusala » Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:43 am

SarathW wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:44 pm
The original article posted on this thread is superficial & often in error thus will probably add more fuel to the fire rather than help.
Agree.
The biggest problem today is that we trying to solve the present problem with the baggage of the past.
What we should talk about is not what happened thousand years ago.
We should look at the world today and see what is happening around us.
Stay in the present moment.
“The past is never dead. It's not even past.” - William Faulkner
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by paul » Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:04 pm

“According to Donald, theoretic cognition led to the post-axial, secular age of the modern world. In the post-axial age of theoretic cognition, the primary dichotomy is no longer between sacred and profane (pre-axial), transcendent and mundane (axial), but rather between the religious and the secular (post-axial) (cf, Bellah and Joas, eds, 2012). At least in the West, science, verifiable knowledge, public discourse, the marketplace and government all take place in the sphere of the secular, whereas religious beliefs and ethical practices are in the sphere of individual, private beliefs and practices.”

Bikkhu Bodhi has been using ‘mundane/transcendental’ and I agree. With the advent of the millennium (2000), I think the wheel has turned and momentum is now towards the next axial age, albeit not for a matter of centuries to come. That can be seen in the the elemental change of the energy form from water (liquid) to air and fire (petrol to electric, from fossil fuel to solar/wind power.)


Mundane Order
Ignorance (avijja)
Kamma formations (sankhara)
Consciousness (viññana)
Mentality-materiality (namarupa)
Sixfold sense base (salayatana)
Contact (phassa)
Feeling (vedana)
Craving (tanha)
Clinging (upadana)
Existence (bhava)
Birth (jati)
Suffering (dukkha)

Transcendental Order
Faith (saddha)
Joy (pamojja)
Rapture (piti)
Tranquillity (passaddhi)
Happiness (sukha)
Concentration (samadhi)
Knowledge and vision of things as they are (yathabhutañanadassana)
Disenchantment (nibbida)
Dispassion (viraga)
Emancipation (vimutti)
Knowledge of destruction of the cankers (asavakkhaye ñana)
—-Exposition of the Upanisa sutta, Bikkhu Bodhi.

___________________________________________
I found this passage interesting and think the continuing influence of the natural world in Indonesia contributes to it, being an island nation dotted with 127 active volcanoes and difficult terrain:

“In an enchanted world, human beings are surrounded by unseen powers. Does rapid social, political, economic and technological change, along with higher education, weaken belief in magic and a unified moral cosmos? In most Western countries, magic is consigned to fantasy and superstition. Is that also happening in Indonesia? My research suggests that most Indonesians still live in a sacred cosmos and experience an unseen world of spirits and powers.”

Although the suttas frequently promote ‘disenchantment’, there is also the persistent presence of the Deva worlds and this rich aspect is yet to be accommodated as a living reality in western Buddhism and a more widespread attainment of jhana is a necessary factor in its development, and according to the Buddha's instructions, jhana is best obtained in a natural setting.

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by SarathW » Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:15 am

Kusala wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:43 am

“The past is never dead. It's not even past.” - William Faulkner
I do not think Buddha will share this idea.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Dhammanando » Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:39 am

lyndon taylor wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:02 am
That being said how did India end up 80% idolatrous Hindus if Muslims had taken over and exterminated them, it doesn't make sense, obviously Muslims and Hindus have lived side by side in India for over 1000 years.
India's Mughal rulers were broadly divided between (1) religiously zealous Muslims who wanted to forcibly convert the infidels and exterminate the recalcitrant, and (2) avaricious Muslims who preferred not to convert the infidels but to let them remain in their unbelief so that they could be fleeced via the jizya tax. Hinduism survived largely because the venal rulers happened to outnumber the pious ones and because large numbers of Hindus chose to pay jizya rather than convert. The enforcement of these tributary payments lasted from the 11th to the 19th century, with occasional interruptions, notably under the (relatively) enlightened rule of Akbar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jizya#India

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Kusala » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:08 pm

What's interesting is the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees in Muslim countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, but they aren't given citizenship...but a Buddhist country is supposed to?

UN committee urges Myanmar to give citizenship to Rohingyas http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... s-51197288
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by paul » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:07 pm

Kusala wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:08 pm
UN committee urges Myanmar to give citizenship to Rohingyas
In 2016 Barack Obama stated correctly that “we are living in the most peaceful era in human history and the world has never been less violent”. Continuity of this trend will allow a diversity of beliefs to coexist and grow more idiosyncratic side-by-side with each other. This is shown for example by the anti-evolution Christians in the US deep south, whose influence is as strong as ever, and who have successfully passed bills against science education into legislation, allowing them to live within society but maintain their own belief system, including that the world is 7000 years old etc. Theravada countries like Myanmar I think will show the lead in allowing minorities to flourish within their territories. This is looking forward toward the future and not perpetuating mediaeval attitudes from the past. Diversity will allow all the possible religious expressions of humanity to flourish, in accord with what has been recognised as the Anthropocene, or age dominated by human influence. Anthropocentrism, the belief that humans are the most significant entity of the universe, finds concord with Buddhist cosmology where of the three spheres of existence, the human realm is the most favourable destination for advancement:

“Let us human beings apply ourselves wholeheartedly and take up the unique opportunity given by our present birth. In the round of samsara it is extremely rare to rise above the realms of woe, where the way out of suffering cannot be followed, and a human birth is even more favorable to awakening than birth in the realm of the gods. Devas envy us our place, ostensibly so low on the cosmic scale, and wish to be reborn as humans. The Buddha Sasana still thrives, the Dhamma is available in full, there are excellent teachers who are true disciples of the Master, and we are on the best plane for striving.”—-“Teacher of the Devas”, Jootla.
The anthropocentric implication that humans are superior to animals also finds resonance in Theravada cosmology, and Buddhist ideas are converging with the global direction, evidenced by the societal adoption of mindfulness.
Last edited by paul on Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by retrofuturist » Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:38 am

Greetings,

Posts relating to 'Verifiable Knowledge' and 'The Sphere Of The Secular' have been moved.

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"One discerns wrong view as wrong view, and right view as right view. This is one's right view." (MN 117)

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Re: Muslims, Islam and Europe

Post by Zom » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:10 pm

5 cents. Last week I had a talk with sri-lankan student. She said she was from a small town near Colombo (or Kandy - I forgot!). 90% of population there - muslims, and local government is muslim too. And you know what? They forbade buddhists to celebrate openly (on the streets) buddhist holidays like Vesak for example. Just one small life fact.

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Saengnapha » Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:36 am

Kusala wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:08 pm
What's interesting is the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees in Muslim countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, but they aren't given citizenship...but a Buddhist country is supposed to?

UN committee urges Myanmar to give citizenship to Rohingyas http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... s-51197288
Look at the Palestinian refugee population in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, etc. These people are still living in camps, unassimilated into the fabric of society, and still being used as political pawns by Islamic governments against Israel. It's been almost 70 years, and these folks are fellow Muslims and ethnically the same people!

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Kusala » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:34 am

Saengnapha wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:36 am
Kusala wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:08 pm
What's interesting is the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees in Muslim countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, but they aren't given citizenship...but a Buddhist country is supposed to?

UN committee urges Myanmar to give citizenship to Rohingyas http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... s-51197288
Look at the Palestinian refugee population in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, etc. These people are still living in camps, unassimilated into the fabric of society, and still being used as political pawns by Islamic governments against Israel. It's been almost 70 years, and these folks are fellow Muslims and ethnically the same people!
I think it's safe to say that the Jews and Buddhists are aware of "Taqiyya".
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Saengnapha » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:48 pm

Kusala wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:34 am
Saengnapha wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:36 am
Kusala wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:08 pm
What's interesting is the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees in Muslim countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, but they aren't given citizenship...but a Buddhist country is supposed to?

UN committee urges Myanmar to give citizenship to Rohingyas http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... s-51197288
Look at the Palestinian refugee population in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, etc. These people are still living in camps, unassimilated into the fabric of society, and still being used as political pawns by Islamic governments against Israel. It's been almost 70 years, and these folks are fellow Muslims and ethnically the same people!
I think it's safe to say that the Jews and Buddhists are aware of "Taqiyya".
I'm not following how that relates to Rohingya and Palestinians. :thinking:

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Re: Muslims, Islam and Europe

Post by justindesilva » Fri Dec 01, 2017 5:04 pm

Zom wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:10 pm
5 cents. Last week I had a talk with sri-lankan student. She said she was from a small town near Colombo (or Kandy - I forgot!). 90% of population there - muslims, and local government is muslim too. And you know what? They forbade buddhists to celebrate openly (on the streets) buddhist holidays like Vesak for example. Just one small life fact.
May be the international journals do not publish well balanced news about the conflicts between Buddhist communities and the Muslim communities. Today in Sri Lanka many townships that had small populations of Muslim communities have grown to be large communities. Their Muslim communities are living as next door neighbours and purchasing of lands for Muslims is helped by the mosque.
Today politicians who have got close ties with the ruling parties are clearing large forest reserves to build Moslem communities with lands developed for settling Moslem communities helped by some middle East countries.
A recent Muslim and sinhala Buddhist conflict was stopped by the government with difficulty. Any involvement between a sinhala Buddhist or a Muslim could be made use of as violence for political advantage.
The worst part is that the Moslem communities are growing in numbers as they observe much less family planning while the buddist families often have small family units. It is observed that in May be another 20 years time the Moslems will have enough voting power to select a president of their own.
Talking of Rohingyas in Myanmar one must remember that Muslim communities from Bangladesh were allowed to enter Myanmar whereas it is these migrants who started harassing the Myanmar Buddhists.
And most interestingly I saw a recent article that by 2050
The number of Muslims in UK will outnumber the rest of the population.
The strategy of the Muslim communities supported by their mosques is producing their generation and is a well planned strategy in Buddhist countries.
It also must be noted that Buddhists have no restriction in marrying a Moslem the Moslems cannot marry Buddhists unless converted. When the Moslem traders came to Sri Lanka long long ago the men came alone and married sinhala buddhist females. These women always since then remained a part of the Moslem community.

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Re: Buddhism and Islam in Asia: A Long and Complicated History

Post by Zom » Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:59 pm

May be the international journals do not publish well balanced news about the conflicts between Buddhist communities and the Muslim communities. Today in Sri Lanka many townships that had small populations of Muslim communities have grown to be large communities. Their Muslim communities are living as next door neighbours and purchasing of lands for Muslims is helped by the mosque.
Today politicians who have got close ties with the ruling parties are clearing large forest reserves to build Moslem communities with lands developed for settling Moslem communities helped by some middle East countries.
A recent Muslim and sinhala Buddhist conflict was stopped by the government with difficulty. Any involvement between a sinhala Buddhist or a Muslim could be made use of as violence for political advantage.
The worst part is that the Moslem communities are growing in numbers as they observe much less family planning while the buddist families often have small family units.....

The strategy of the Muslim communities supported by their mosques is producing their generation and is a well planned strategy in Buddhist countries.
It also must be noted that Buddhists have no restriction in marrying a Moslem the Moslems cannot marry Buddhists unless converted. When the Moslem traders came to Sri Lanka long long ago the men came alone and married sinhala buddhist females. These women always since then remained a part of the Moslem community.
Yes, this is quite close to what she said to me.

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