The Reliability of the Early Buddhist Texts (Pali Canon)

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DooDoot
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Re: The Reliability of the Early Buddhist Texts (Pali Canon)

Post by DooDoot »

The First Council is recorded in the Vinaya of all schools whose texts are available [2, 129, 150] [3, 100, 173–174]. While they differ on details, each implying that it was their own version of the canon that was recited [2, 150], they all agree that the business of the council was to recite the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s. These Vinaya accounts of the first Council all contain details about which Suttas and which parts of the Vinaya were recited, showing that the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s existed in some form in all these schools [6]

Certain Vinayas—the Dharmaguptaka, the Sarvāstivāda, the Mūlasarvāstivāda, and the Vinayamātṛkā Sūtra—also add the Abhidhamma, although the Pali, Mahāsāṅghika, and Mahīśāsaka Vinayas notably omit any mention of the Abhidhamma
:shrug: 7 vinayana :shock:

Where can these accounts of the 1st council be read in the Vinayana? Thanks :smile:
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DooDoot
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Re: The Reliability of the Early Buddhist Texts (Pali Canon)

Post by DooDoot »

Two trends in Buddhism in the Mauryan period were particularly influential on Buddhist literature. On the one hand, the Sangha became much larger, better endowed, and more specialised, with detailed systems of Buddhist exegesis. On the other hand, the Dhamma reached out to a much broader spectrum of the lay community.

These trends correspond to the developments of the content in the doctrinally secondary books of the early canons. On the one hand, Buddhist literature saw the evolution of the Abhidhamma texts, a highly abstruse and specialised literature. On the other hand, there was the development of the popular stories of the Jātakas, Vimānavatthu, Buddha biography, and the like. This literature is thus situated naturally within the Mauryan period, and is quite unlike the literature of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, on which it depends.
Within the Pali school, the literary style of texts composed in Sri Lanka, such as the commentaries and the chronicles, is substantially different from the style of texts inherited from India [3, 175]. And since the new style that emerged in Sri Lanka is not encountered in the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, it would appear that the Pali 󰡜󰠤󰧎s were considered closed upon their arrival on the island, that is, at the time of Asoka
5. The Jātakas mention things not found in the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s such as bricks (iṭṭhaka) and trade routes to countries outside of India (e.g. Jā no. 339).
There are numerous doctrinal developments between the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s and non-󰡜󰠤󰧎s. Some specific examples are:

1. Karma as destiny (Vimāna- and Peta-vatthu);9
2. Transference of merit (Petavatthu [2, 󰨚󰨚󰣠󰨚, 󰨚󰨚󰨚󰨆󰣠󰣠󰣠–󰨚󰤯]);
3. Elaboration on and fascination with good and bad destinations of rebirth (Vimāna- and Peta-vatthu);
4. Shift in attitude to jhāna, especially the Abhidhammic concept of lokuttarajjhāna (Vibh);
5. Dependent origination happening on an ‘occasion’ (Vibh 145);
6. Emphasis on and detailed explanation of obscure doctrines in the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, e.g. the relay coaches of MN 24/MĀ 9/EĀ 39.10 and the kasiṇas (Vism);
7. Increased detail and expansion in the exposition of core teachings of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, such as the description of insight (Vism);
8. Abstract teachings as opposed to applied (Abhidhamma, Paṭisambhidāmagga);
9. Systematisation of “dhammas” (Dhammasaṅgaṇī);
10. The explanation of dhammas as “bearing their own essence”, sabhāva (As 39,11);
11. Khaṇikavāda, “doctrine of momentariness” (e.g. Vism 268,14; Vibh-a 27,3);
12. Systematisation of “conditions” (Paṭṭhāna);
13. Omniscience of the Buddha (JN 99);
14. Lineage of past Buddhas (Buddhavaṁsa);
15. Pāramīs (Cariyāpiṭaka);
16. Bodhisatta path (Cariyāpiṭaka and commentaries);
17. Books on history (Aśokāvadāna, Dīpavaṁsa, Mahāvaṁsa).
According to the Sinhalese chronicle the Dīpavaṁsa (5.37 of Oldenberg’s translation), the Mahāsāṅghika rejected the Parivāra (the last book of the Pali Vinaya Piṭaka), the six books of the Abhidhamma (six, because this is said to have occurred before the composition of the Kathāvatthu), the Paṭisambhidāmagga, the Niddesa, and some of the Jātakas.
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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DooDoot
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Re: The Reliability of the Early Buddhist Texts (Pali Canon)

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Conc󰀰usion

The Buddha did not just teach the truth as he found it, but carefully detailed the way to discover the truth, and warned against leaping to rash conclusions. When we hear words of caution against accepting anything on mere faith, we are hearing the unmistakable inflection of the historical Buddha’s own voice.

The point of establishing the authenticity of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, then, is not to prove that they are all true. It is to show that they are useful. Within the corpus we indeed find that some things are well learnt, others badly learnt; some true, and some otherwise. With some reflection and effort, we are able to discern these things. What remains is a powerful, clear, balanced, and profound approach to the spiritual life. This approach has been of benefit to countless people, and we believe that it remains so today. By
encouraging the study of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, we believe more people will be moved to apply these teachings and test them in the only way that the Buddha cared about: to reach the end of suffering.
:smile: :twothumbsup:
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/paticcasamuppada
https://soundcloud.com/doodoot/anapanasati

justindesilva
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Re: The Reliability of the Early Buddhist Texts (Pali Canon)

Post by justindesilva »

:goodpost:
DooDoot wrote:
Wed Mar 18, 2020 7:25 am
Conc󰀰usion

The Buddha did not just teach the truth as he found it, but carefully detailed the way to discover the truth, and warned against leaping to rash conclusions. When we hear words of caution against accepting anything on mere faith, we are hearing the unmistakable inflection of the historical Buddha’s own voice.

The point of establishing the authenticity of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, then, is not to prove that they are all true. It is to show that they are useful. Within the corpus we indeed find that some things are well learnt, others badly learnt; some true, and some otherwise. With some reflection and effort, we are able to discern these things. What remains is a powerful, clear, balanced, and profound approach to the spiritual life. This approach has been of benefit to countless people, and we believe that it remains so today. By
encouraging the study of the 󰡜󰠤󰧎s, we believe more people will be moved to apply these teachings and test them in the only way that the Buddha cared about: to reach the end of suffering.
:smile: :twothumbsup:
:goodpost:

Let me also highlight the fact that Lord Buddha treated any person depending on the psychology of the person who was in his presence to enlighten on damma. This is why there are many thousands of sutta preached. For an example when two disciples were brothers one of whom had a memory and the other different Lord Buddha used a white handkerchief ( Vattupama sutta I remember) to explain damma.
When patacharava , a woman in distress by losing the only child, Lord Buddha requested her to find formerly to bring mustard seeds from a house where there had been no funeral.
It is with this example Lord Buddha made her realise the damma, to make her to be an arhath.
He had used examples from his former births to explain damma with different births.
These are a few such examples. He made Jatilas who were jaina believers to be arhats with examples ( I believe fire).
When Alavslaka a demon came to debate with him Lord Buddha used dyana to over power him.
Each sutta hence is a unique and successful application to explain damma through out the period he lived.

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