Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

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Paccayata
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Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by Paccayata » Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:27 pm

I once saw I believe two other variations on sati aside from sati-sampajañña. I can't remember what they were and am unable to find them in web searches. Can anyone recall or point me to a resource?

Thank you!

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DooDoot
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Re: Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by DooDoot » Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:48 am

I doubt there can be sati without sampajañña in relation to the Buddhist Path.
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Wizard in the Forest
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Re: Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by Wizard in the Forest » Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:54 am

There's a decent amount if one interprets miccha sati to be attention to wrong things. Think of a thief preparing for a great heist. They have plenty of their awareness to attention to all things around them, for all the wrong reasons, as it's all in the pursuit of a wrong goal. So yeah, technically plenty of non sampajañña sati one can think of, just think of any kind of mindfulness made with the wrong moral pursuit and you're probably on the right line. That said, I welcome correction if I am wrong.
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chownah
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Re: Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by chownah » Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:07 am

You could try Nyanatiloka's dictionary of buddhist terms https://what-buddha-said.net/library/Bu ... ict.n2.htm

There are many versions of this on-line and you might search for a better one than this one.
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DooDoot
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Re: Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by DooDoot » Mon Sep 23, 2019 7:20 am

Wizard in the Forest wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:54 am
There's a decent amount if one interprets miccha sati to be attention to wrong things.
Yes. Miccha (wrong) sati is without sapmajañña.
MN 117 wrote: sammāsatissa, micchāsati nijjiṇṇā hoti …

In one of right mindfulness, wrong mindfulness is abolished...

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html
There is always an official executioner. If you try to take his place, It is like trying to be a master carpenter and cutting wood. If you try to cut wood like a master carpenter, you will only hurt your hand.

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zan
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Re: Non-sapmajañña varieties of sati

Post by zan » Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:12 am

linked discourses 47
saṃyutta nikāya 47

4. not learned from anyone else
4. ananussutavagga

35. Mindful
35. Satisutta
At Sāvatthī.
Sāvatthinidānaṃ.

“Mendicants, a mendicant should live mindful and aware.
“Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno.
This is my instruction to you.
Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī.

And how is a mendicant mindful?
Kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti?
It’s when a mendicant meditates by observing an aspect of the body—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world.
Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ;
They meditate observing an aspect of feelings …
vedanāsu … pe …
mind …
citte … pe …
principles—keen, aware, and mindful, rid of desire and aversion for the world.
dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ.
That’s how a mendicant is mindful.
Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti.

And how is a mendicant aware?
Kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti?
It’s when a mendicant knows feelings as they arise, as they remain, and as they go away.
Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno viditā vedanā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti.
They know thoughts as they arise, as they remain, and as they go away.
Viditā vitakkā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti.
They know perceptions as they arise, as they remain, and as they go away.
Viditā saññā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti.
That’s how a mendicant is aware.
Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti.
A mendicant should live mindful and aware.
Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno.
This is my instruction to you.”
Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī”ti.
-SN 47.35
linked discourses 47
saṃyutta nikāya 47

2. at nālandā
2. nālandavagga

20. The Finest Lady in the Land
20. Janapadakalyāṇīsutta
so i have heard.
evaṃ me sutaṃ—
At one time the Buddha was staying in the land of the Sumbhas, near the town of the Sumbhas called Sedaka.
ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā sumbhesu viharati sedakaṃ nāma sumbhānaṃ nigamo.
There the Buddha addressed the mendicants,
Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi:
“Mendicants!”
“bhikkhavo”ti.

“Venerable sir,” they replied.
“Bhadante”ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ.
The Buddha said this:
Bhagavā etadavoca:

“Mendicants, suppose that on hearing, ‘The finest lady in the land! The finest lady in the land!’ a large crowd would gather.
“Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ‘janapadakalyāṇī, janapadakalyāṇī’ti kho, bhikkhave, mahājanakāyo sannipateyya.
And the finest lady in the land would dance and sing in a most thrilling way.
‘Sā kho panassa janapadakalyāṇī paramapāsāvinī nacce, paramapāsāvinī gīte.
On hearing, ‘The finest lady in the land is dancing and singing! The finest lady in the land is dancing and singing!’ an even larger crowd would gather.
Janapadakalyāṇī naccati gāyatī’ti kho, bhikkhave, bhiyyoso mattāya mahājanakāyo sannipateyya.

Then a person would come along who wants to live and doesn’t want to die, who wants to be happy and recoils from pain.
Atha puriso āgaccheyya jīvitukāmo amaritukāmo sukhakāmo dukkhappaṭikūlo.
They’d say to him,
Tamenaṃ evaṃ vadeyya:
‘Mister, this is a bowl full to the brim with oil. You must carry it in between this large crowd and the finest lady in the land.
‘ayaṃ te, ambho purisa, samatittiko telapatto antarena ca mahāsamajjaṃ antarena ca janapadakalyāṇiyā pariharitabbo.
And a man with a drawn sword will follow behind you.
Puriso ca te ukkhittāsiko piṭṭhito piṭṭhito anubandhissati.
Wherever you spill even a drop, he’ll chop off your head right there.’
Yattheva naṃ thokampi chaḍḍessati tattheva te siro pātessatī’ti.

What do you think, mendicants?
Taṃ kiṃ maññatha, bhikkhave,
Would that person lose focus on that bowl, and negligently get distracted outside?”
api nu so puriso amuṃ telapattaṃ amanasikaritvā bahiddhā pamādaṃ āhareyyā”ti?

“No, sir.”
“No hetaṃ, bhante”.

“I’ve made up this simile to make a point.
“Upamā kho myāyaṃ, bhikkhave, katā atthassa viññāpanāya.
And this is what it means.
Ayaṃ cevettha attho—
‘A bowl of oil filled to the brim’ is a term for mindfulness of the body.
samatittiko telapattoti kho, bhikkhave, kāyagatāya etaṃ satiyā adhivacanaṃ.

So you should train like this:
Tasmātiha, bhikkhave, evaṃ sikkhitabbaṃ:
‘We will develop mindfulness of the body. We’ll cultivate it, make it our vehicle and our basis, keep it up, consolidate it, and properly implement it.’
‘kāyagatā sati no bhāvitā bhavissati bahulīkatā yānīkatā vatthukatā anuṭṭhitā paricitā susamāraddhā’ti.
That’s how you should train.”
Evañhi kho, bhikkhave, sikkhitabban”ti.
-SN 47.20
Never read anything I write as an accurate statement about anything whatsoever. First, look to wiser ones than I. Look to wise texts. Unless you can confirm their accuracy from a reliable source, treat my writings like word games, nothing more.

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