Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

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khemindas
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Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by khemindas » Sun Aug 04, 2019 1:29 pm

This topic is not for those who doesn't believe in Gods and deities, spirits, ghosts e.t.c, if you want argue please go to another topic. So , that is not secret for us, that later Buddhism has created a huge amount of deities for worshipping in Mahayana and Vajrayana, but I'm curious about more authentic worshipping of early Buddhism. In many suttas (AN 5.41, AN 5.58, DN 16, Snp 2.1 e.t.c.) Buddha recommended make offerings to the gods. But it is not clear about whole ritual, how was it made, did early buddhists chant to deities mantra, dharani or sadhana? Of course I know that we have some parittas given for protection by gods, such as atanatiya paritta, but it's not looks like offering, in sutta only chanting is mentioned, nothing about offering or ritual, and also this paritta or sutta itself not clear, because it says, to call any Yakkha general for help, but it doesn't says, how to do this. And also for example in early cosmology we even have Sakka deity, who is even Sotapanna, quite a good living object for veneration, who is still alive. I also read, that inside sarvastivada vinaya there is mentioned mahamayuri vidya mantra,but I suppose, it can be influence of Vajrayana, so If you have found any sutta or agama or any historical mentioning of worshipping in early Buddhim, I will appreciate if you give any information. I also suppose, that it can be universal indo-european offering ritual which can be a little different, depend on country, for example we have treba in slavic polytheism.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Antaradhana » Sun Aug 04, 2019 3:50 pm

The vedic fire sacrifices (milk, grain, oil, flowers are thrown into the fire, accompanied by Vedic hymns or mantras). This is practiced now in buddhist countries. For example, in Sri Lanka in many buddhist monasteries there are hearth (kunda) for such sacrifices.
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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Grigoris » Sun Aug 04, 2019 3:51 pm

khemindas wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 1:29 pm
This topic is not for those who doesn't believe in Gods and deities, spirits, ghosts e.t.c, if you want argue please go to another topic. So , that is not secret for us, that later Buddhism has created a huge amount of deities for worshipping in Mahayana and Vajrayana, but I'm curious about more authentic worshipping of early Buddhism. In many suttas (AN 5.41, AN 5.58, DN 16, Snp 2.1 e.t.c.) Buddha recommended make offerings to the gods. But it is not clear about whole ritual, how was it made, did early buddhists chant to deities mantra, dharani or sadhana? Of course I know that we have some parittas given for protection by gods, such as atanatiya paritta, but it's not looks like offering, in sutta only chanting is mentioned, nothing about offering or ritual, and also this paritta or sutta itself not clear, because it says, to call any Yakkha general for help, but it doesn't says, how to do this. And also for example in early cosmology we even have Sakka deity, who is even Sotapanna, quite a good living object for veneration, who is still alive. I also read, that inside sarvastivada vinaya there is mentioned mahamayuri vidya mantra,but I suppose, it can be influence of Vajrayana, so If you have found any sutta or agama or any historical mentioning of worshipping in early Buddhim, I will appreciate if you give any information. I also suppose, that it can be universal indo-european offering ritual which can be a little different, depend on country, for example we have treba in slavic polytheism.
I am just going to overlook the blaring misinterpretations and misinformation surrounding "late" Buddhism to focus on the actual subject:

I imagine that the Buddha did not outline rituals, because he figured that the existing rituals being used to worship particular deities, was good enough.

I could explain to you how it works from a Vajrayana perspective, but we are just crypto-Hindus so I don't think you would be interested. ;)
ye dhammā hetuppabhavā tesaṁ hetuṁ tathāgato āha,
tesaṃca yo nirodho - evaṁvādī mahāsamaṇo.

Of those phenomena which arise from causes:
Those causes have been taught by the Tathāgata,
And their cessation too - thus proclaims the Great Ascetic.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Sabbe_Dhamma_Anatta » Sun Aug 04, 2019 5:07 pm

Ratana Sutta (sn 2.1)

The 'rituals' done by humans, not endorsed by the Buddha, imo.
Whatever spirits have gathered here,
— on the earth, in the sky —
may you all be happy
& listen intently to what I say.

Thus, spirits, you should all be attentive.
Show kindness to the human race.
Day & night they give offerings,
so, being heedful, protect them.
...
...
...
🅢🅐🅑🅑🅔 🅓🅗🅐🅜🅜🅐 🅐🅝🅐🅣🅣🅐
  • "the one thing all the mistaken views have in common is the assump­tion that the self exists" ~ DN1
  • "It is an entirely and perfectly foolish idea" ~ MN22
  • The No-self doctrine is found only in the teaching of the Buddha.
  • No-self (anatta) means that there is no permanent, unchanging entity in anything animate or inanimate. ~ SN22.59

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Volo
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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Volo » Sun Aug 04, 2019 5:37 pm

Wouldn't worshiping the deities violate Vinaya rule, which prohibits paying homage to those who are not ordained?
and also this paritta or sutta itself not clear, because it says, to call any Yakkha general for help, but it doesn't says, how to do this.
I think it does say, how:
then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out:

“This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.”
And in the end Buddha adds:
Learn the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, master the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, bear in mind the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, is for your welfare and benefit
Doesn't seem to mention any special ritual.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by manas » Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:19 pm

khemindas wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 1:29 pm
In many suttas (AN 5.41, AN 5.58, DN 16, Snp 2.1 e.t.c.) Buddha recommended make offerings to the gods.
I looked up one of the suttas you mentioned, AN 5.41, and I found a passage which I suppose could technically be construed as a 'recommendation' to make offerings to the gods:
AN 5:41: “And further, the disciple of the noble ones—using the wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained—performs the five oblations: to relatives, guests, the dead, kings, & devas. This is the fourth benefit that can be obtained from wealth. (https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/AN/AN5_41.html)
However please note that in this passage, 'the devas' are listed along with 'relatives, guests, the dead [and] kings', as recipients fit for making 'the five oblations' to. Furthermore, while I'm no scholar of Vedic religion and culture, 'the five oblations' sounds like a preexisting cultural norm of the time, which kings such as Anāthapiṇḍika would be expected to perform. The title of the sutta itself - Benefits to be Obtained (from Wealth) - appears to be the main point of this sutta, does it not? Making oblations to the devas is mentioned in passing (along with oblations to relatives, the dead, etc).
Last edited by manas on Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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but well-laden caravan
–a dangerous road,

like a person who loves life
–a poison,

one should avoid
–evil deeds.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Antaradhana » Sun Aug 04, 2019 9:38 pm

Buddha condemned only bloody sacrifices, during which people took the lives of breathing creatures, but he did not condemn bloodless sacrifices, and said that such sacrifices would be beneficial.

SN 3.9 Sacrifice

At Sāvatthī.

Now at that time a big sacrifice had been set up for King Pasenadi of Kosala. Five hundred chief bulls, five hundred bullocks, five hundred heifers, five hundred goats, and five hundred rams had been led to the pillar for the sacrifice. His bondservants, employees, and workers did their jobs under threat of punishment and danger, weeping with tearful faces.

Then several mendicants robed up in the morning and, taking their bowls and robes, entered Sāvatthī for alms. Then, after the meal, when they returned from alms-round, they went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and told him what was happening.

Then, knowing the meaning of this, on that occasion the Buddha recited these verses:

“Horse sacrifice, human sacrifice,
the sacrifices of the ‘stick-casting’,
the ‘royal soma drinking’, and the ‘unbarred’—
these huge violent sacrifices yield no great fruit.

The great sages of good conduct
don’t attend sacrifices
where goats, sheep, and cattle
and various creatures are killed.

But the great sages of good conduct
do attend non-violent sacrifices
of regular family tradition,
where goats, sheep, and cattle,
and various creatures aren’t killed.

A clever person should sacrifice like this,
for this sacrifice is very fruitful.
For a sponsor of sacrifices like this,
things get better, not worse.
Such a sacrifice is truly abundant,
and even the deities are pleased.”
All that is subject to arising is subject to termination, all formations are non-permanent. And that which is impermanent is suffering. Regarding what is impermanent and prone to suffering, one cannot say: "This is mine, I am this, this is my self".

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by khemindas » Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:40 pm

Volo wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 5:37 pm
Wouldn't worshiping the deities violate Vinaya rule, which prohibits paying homage to those who are not ordained?
and also this paritta or sutta itself not clear, because it says, to call any Yakkha general for help, but it doesn't says, how to do this.
I think it does say, how:
then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out:

“This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.”
And in the end Buddha adds:
Learn the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, master the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, bear in mind the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, the “Āṭānāṭiya” protection, monks, is for your welfare and benefit
Doesn't seem to mention any special ritual.
yes it could be counted in such way, however, there are always will be some contradictions between spirit and letter, for example I surely know, that this layperson or deity is arya and paying homage to him it doesn't seem wrong, for example when we chant supatipanno chanting or Sangham saranam gacchami, we are automatically paying homage to whole arya sangha, which includes not only monks. It still doesn't clear in atanatiya how to call any yakkha general, in Sutta he only listing their names, but doesn't say how to cry out: hey indo! This yakkha seized me.? varuna! This yakkha..? Or om indo this yakkha siezed me! moreover the list of yakkha generals in nominative and not in vocative case what makes it more unclear how to call them.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Grigoris » Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:11 am

Many of the Gods took Refuge when the Buddha was preaching in Tushita, so...
Last edited by Grigoris on Mon Aug 05, 2019 9:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
ye dhammā hetuppabhavā tesaṁ hetuṁ tathāgato āha,
tesaṃca yo nirodho - evaṁvādī mahāsamaṇo.

Of those phenomena which arise from causes:
Those causes have been taught by the Tathāgata,
And their cessation too - thus proclaims the Great Ascetic.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Grigoris » Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:13 am

khemindas wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:40 pm
yes it could be counted in such way, however, there are always will be some contradictions between spirit and letter, for example I surely know, that this layperson or deity is arya and paying homage to him it doesn't seem wrong, for example when we chant supatipanno chanting or Sangham saranam gacchami, we are automatically paying homage to whole arya sangha, which includes not only monks. It still doesn't clear in atanatiya how to call any yakkha general, in Sutta he only listing their names, but doesn't say how to cry out: hey indo! This yakkha seized me.? varuna! This yakkha..? Or om indo this yakkha siezed me! moreover the list of yakkha generals in nominative and not in vocative case what makes it more unclear how to call them.
The Yaksha generals are oath bound to the Buddhas, to assist them.
ye dhammā hetuppabhavā tesaṁ hetuṁ tathāgato āha,
tesaṃca yo nirodho - evaṁvādī mahāsamaṇo.

Of those phenomena which arise from causes:
Those causes have been taught by the Tathāgata,
And their cessation too - thus proclaims the Great Ascetic.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by form » Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:39 am

This are occult knowledge when one developed higher consciousness, one will have the ability to see how it functions.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by khemindas » Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:44 am

Grigoris wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:13 am
khemindas wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:40 pm
yes it could be counted in such way, however, there are always will be some contradictions between spirit and letter, for example I surely know, that this layperson or deity is arya and paying homage to him it doesn't seem wrong, for example when we chant supatipanno chanting or Sangham saranam gacchami, we are automatically paying homage to whole arya sangha, which includes not only monks. It still doesn't clear in atanatiya how to call any yakkha general, in Sutta he only listing their names, but doesn't say how to cry out: hey indo! This yakkha seized me.? varuna! This yakkha..? Or om indo this yakkha siezed me! moreover the list of yakkha generals in nominative and not in vocative case what makes it more unclear how to call them.
The Yaksha generals are oath bound to the Buddhas, to assist them.
From the suttas we know only Vajrapani yaksha have assisted Buddha. And my question not about this, but my question about how to call yakkha. Here an example when Buddha says, that you can call for help yakkhas:

“Now, dear Sir, whatever non-human beings—be they male yakkha or female yakkha or yakkha boy or yakkha girl or yakkha minister or yakkha councillor or yakkha messenger or male gandhabba or female gandhabba or gandhabba boy or gandhabba girl or gandhabba minister or gandhabba councillor or gandhabba messenger or male kumbhaṇḍa or female kumbhaṇḍa or kumbhaṇḍa boy or kumbhaṇḍa girl or kumbhaṇḍa minister or kumbhaṇḍa councillor or kumbhaṇḍa messenger or male nāga or female nāga or nāga boy or nāga girl or nāga minister or nāga councillor or nāga messenger—with a wicked mind should come near a monk or a nun or a layman or a laywoman while they are going, or stand near while they are standing, or sit near while they are sitting, or lie near while they are lying, then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out: “This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.” To which yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals?

“Inda, Soma, and Varuṇa,
Bhāradvāja, Pajāpati,
Candana, and Kāmaseṭṭha,
Kinnughaṇḍu, and Nighaṇḍu,
Panāda, and Opamañña,
and Mātali, the gods’ charioteer.

“The gandhabbas Citta and Sena,
the kings Nala and Janesabha,
Sātāgira, Hemavata,
Puṇṇaka, Karatiya, Guḷa,

“Sīvaka, and Mucalinda,
Vessāmitta, Yugandhara,
Gopāla, and Suppagedha,
Hiri, Netti, and Mandiya,

“Pañcālacaṇḍa, Ālavaka,
Pajjuna, Sumana, Sumukha, Dadhīmukha,
Maṇi, Māṇi, Cara, Dīgha,
together with Serissaka:

“Then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out: ‘This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.’

In pali:

Santi hi, mārisa, amanussā caṇḍā ruddhā rabhasā, te neva mahārājānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, amanussā mahārājānaṃ avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Seyyathāpi, mārisa, rañño māgadhassa vijite mahācorā. Te neva rañño māgadhassa ādiyanti, na rañño māgadhassa purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na rañño māgadhassa purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, mahācorā rañño māgadhassa avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Evameva kho, mārisa, santi amanussā caṇḍā ruddhā rabhasā, te neva mahārājānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, amanussā mahārājānaṃ avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Yo hi koci, mārisa, amanusso yakkho vā yakkhinī vā … pe … gandhabbo vā gandhabbī vā … pe … kumbhaṇḍo vā kumbhaṇḍī vā … pe … nāgo vā nāgī vā nāgapotako vā nāgapotikā vā nāgamahāmatto vā nāgapārisajjo vā nāgapacāro vā paduṭṭhacitto bhikkhuṃ vā bhikkhuniṃ vā upāsakaṃ vā upāsikaṃ vā gacchantaṃ vā anugaccheyya, ṭhitaṃ vā upatiṭṭheyya, nisinnaṃ vā upanisīdeyya, nipannaṃ vā upanipajjeyya. Imesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ ujjhāpetabbaṃ vikkanditabbaṃ viravitabbaṃ: ‘ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti.

Katamesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ?

Indo somo varuṇo ca,
bhāradvājo pajāpati;
Candano kāmaseṭṭho ca,
kinnughaṇḍu nighaṇḍu ca.

Panādo opamañño ca,
devasūto ca mātali;
Cittaseno ca gandhabbo,
naḷo rājā janesabho.

Sātāgiro hemavato,
puṇṇako karatiyo guḷo;
Sivako mucalindo ca,
vessāmitto yugandharo.

Gopālo supparodho ca,
Hiri netti ca mandiyo;
Pañcālacaṇḍo āḷavako,
Pajjunno sumano sumukho;
Dadhimukho maṇi māṇivaro dīgho,
Atho serīsako saha.

Imesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ ujjhāpetabbaṃ vikkanditabbaṃ viravitabbaṃ: ‘ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti.


So still not clear does it mean I should shout in this way for example? :
1) Inda ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

2) Soma ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

3) Varuna ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

e.t.c ?
Last edited by khemindas on Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by khemindas » Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:47 am

form wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:39 am
This are occult knowledge when one developed higher consciousness, one will have the ability to see how it functions.
We don't need to know how it's functions, we only need to know how to practice it correctly.

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by form » Mon Aug 05, 2019 11:36 am

khemindas wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:47 am
form wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:39 am
This are occult knowledge when one developed higher consciousness, one will have the ability to see how it functions.
We don't need to know how it's functions, we only need to know how to practice it correctly.
U mean how to appease the Gods correctly in exchange for favours? For example in ancient time for good weather for agriculture, for wealth, for good health?

Even in modern times, we can only see the rituals but not the Gods or other beings. So we won't know if the offerings and agreements in exchange are successful or not. So we cannot tell if it is practice correctly to yield results.

Or do u mean just how the rituals are executed?

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Re: Worshipping to the gods in early Buddhism

Post by Grigoris » Mon Aug 05, 2019 11:38 am

khemindas wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:44 am
Grigoris wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 7:13 am
khemindas wrote:
Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:40 pm
yes it could be counted in such way, however, there are always will be some contradictions between spirit and letter, for example I surely know, that this layperson or deity is arya and paying homage to him it doesn't seem wrong, for example when we chant supatipanno chanting or Sangham saranam gacchami, we are automatically paying homage to whole arya sangha, which includes not only monks. It still doesn't clear in atanatiya how to call any yakkha general, in Sutta he only listing their names, but doesn't say how to cry out: hey indo! This yakkha seized me.? varuna! This yakkha..? Or om indo this yakkha siezed me! moreover the list of yakkha generals in nominative and not in vocative case what makes it more unclear how to call them.
The Yaksha generals are oath bound to the Buddhas, to assist them.
From the suttas we know only Vajrapani yaksha have assisted Buddha. And my question not about this, but my question about how to call yakkha. Here an example when Buddha says, that you can call for help yakkhas:

“Now, dear Sir, whatever non-human beings—be they male yakkha or female yakkha or yakkha boy or yakkha girl or yakkha minister or yakkha councillor or yakkha messenger or male gandhabba or female gandhabba or gandhabba boy or gandhabba girl or gandhabba minister or gandhabba councillor or gandhabba messenger or male kumbhaṇḍa or female kumbhaṇḍa or kumbhaṇḍa boy or kumbhaṇḍa girl or kumbhaṇḍa minister or kumbhaṇḍa councillor or kumbhaṇḍa messenger or male nāga or female nāga or nāga boy or nāga girl or nāga minister or nāga councillor or nāga messenger—with a wicked mind should come near a monk or a nun or a layman or a laywoman while they are going, or stand near while they are standing, or sit near while they are sitting, or lie near while they are lying, then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out: “This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.” To which yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals?

“Inda, Soma, and Varuṇa,
Bhāradvāja, Pajāpati,
Candana, and Kāmaseṭṭha,
Kinnughaṇḍu, and Nighaṇḍu,
Panāda, and Opamañña,
and Mātali, the gods’ charioteer.

“The gandhabbas Citta and Sena,
the kings Nala and Janesabha,
Sātāgira, Hemavata,
Puṇṇaka, Karatiya, Guḷa,

“Sīvaka, and Mucalinda,
Vessāmitta, Yugandhara,
Gopāla, and Suppagedha,
Hiri, Netti, and Mandiya,

“Pañcālacaṇḍa, Ālavaka,
Pajjuna, Sumana, Sumukha, Dadhīmukha,
Maṇi, Māṇi, Cara, Dīgha,
together with Serissaka:

“Then to these yakkhas, great yakkhas, generals, and great generals, one should call out, one should shout out, one should cry out: ‘This yakkha has seized me, this yakkha has grabbed me, this yakkha annoys me, this yakkha harasses me, this yakkha hurts me, this yakkha injures me, this yakkha will not release me.’

In pali:

Santi hi, mārisa, amanussā caṇḍā ruddhā rabhasā, te neva mahārājānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, amanussā mahārājānaṃ avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Seyyathāpi, mārisa, rañño māgadhassa vijite mahācorā. Te neva rañño māgadhassa ādiyanti, na rañño māgadhassa purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na rañño māgadhassa purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, mahācorā rañño māgadhassa avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Evameva kho, mārisa, santi amanussā caṇḍā ruddhā rabhasā, te neva mahārājānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti, na mahārājānaṃ purisakānaṃ purisakānaṃ ādiyanti. Te kho te, mārisa, amanussā mahārājānaṃ avaruddhā nāma vuccanti. Yo hi koci, mārisa, amanusso yakkho vā yakkhinī vā … pe … gandhabbo vā gandhabbī vā … pe … kumbhaṇḍo vā kumbhaṇḍī vā … pe … nāgo vā nāgī vā nāgapotako vā nāgapotikā vā nāgamahāmatto vā nāgapārisajjo vā nāgapacāro vā paduṭṭhacitto bhikkhuṃ vā bhikkhuniṃ vā upāsakaṃ vā upāsikaṃ vā gacchantaṃ vā anugaccheyya, ṭhitaṃ vā upatiṭṭheyya, nisinnaṃ vā upanisīdeyya, nipannaṃ vā upanipajjeyya. Imesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ ujjhāpetabbaṃ vikkanditabbaṃ viravitabbaṃ: ‘ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti.

Katamesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ?

Indo somo varuṇo ca,
bhāradvājo pajāpati;
Candano kāmaseṭṭho ca,
kinnughaṇḍu nighaṇḍu ca.

Panādo opamañño ca,
devasūto ca mātali;
Cittaseno ca gandhabbo,
naḷo rājā janesabho.

Sātāgiro hemavato,
puṇṇako karatiyo guḷo;
Sivako mucalindo ca,
vessāmitto yugandharo.

Gopālo supparodho ca,
Hiri netti ca mandiyo;
Pañcālacaṇḍo āḷavako,
Pajjunno sumano sumukho;
Dadhimukho maṇi māṇivaro dīgho,
Atho serīsako saha.

Imesaṃ yakkhānaṃ mahāyakkhānaṃ senāpatīnaṃ mahā­senā­patī­naṃ ujjhāpetabbaṃ vikkanditabbaṃ viravitabbaṃ: ‘ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti.


So still not clear does it mean I should shout in this way for example? :
1) Inda ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

2) Soma ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

3) Varuna ayaṃ yakkho gaṇhāti, ayaṃ yakkho āvisati, ayaṃ yakkho heṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho viheṭheti, ayaṃ yakkho hiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho vihiṃsati, ayaṃ yakkho na muñcatī’ti

e.t.c ?
Sorry, but I only know the ritual from the Medicine Buddha (Sangye Menla) Sutra and sadhana.
ye dhammā hetuppabhavā tesaṁ hetuṁ tathāgato āha,
tesaṃca yo nirodho - evaṁvādī mahāsamaṇo.

Of those phenomena which arise from causes:
Those causes have been taught by the Tathāgata,
And their cessation too - thus proclaims the Great Ascetic.

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