Meditation for beginners - Anicca

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newbee
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm

Hello all,

I'm a beginner and I'm learning about Buddhism.

I read some of the forum posts and frankly speaking I feel intimidated by the depth of the discussions and the intricacies of Buddhist philosophy.
I'm not sure if I'm convinced about the various core beliefs of Buddhism. That's the result of being constantly bombarded by 'only what is factual/tangible exists. ( I'm struggling with concepts like re-birth,heavens-hells/realms ). Nevertheless, when I read the Buddha's discourses I find myself agreeing with portions of them, especially those which address issues that every human has to deal with sometime or other. I find the teaching of Anicca/impermanence relatable.

I don't know where to start or what is the 'proper/traditional way' to go about. At the moment, I want to focus on Anicca as I feel this is something I can relate to and I hope that I'll develop a holistic understanding of the Buddha's teachings gradually.

So how do I realize Anicca practically (say, be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday). Are there any guided meditation teachings for newbies online (audio/video/books)?

( A word about my current capabilities: I don't have prior experience with meditation. I guess I could sit for perhaps 15 minutes to at most.. less than hour. Also, it's not possible for me to access teachers due to location/work-rel. issues, so that makes me a solitary, cyberspace practitioner. )

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Sam Vara
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by Sam Vara » Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:42 pm

Hi,

Many people practice meditation for insight into impermanence by maintaining steady attention on phenomena, and observing how they change and pass away. There are many different methods for doing this, but lots of them are based on the Satipatthana Sutta

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/aut ... wayof.html

which recommends paying attention to the body, feelings, mind, and mental phenomena. It would probably be worth looking around and finding a guided meditation on line that you like, and which is at least in accord with the basic principles outlined in the sutta. One common practice that beginners often like is "sweeping" the body, paying attention to different parts in turn and observing the changes. It's worth mentioning that most teachers recommend that one develops a level of calm before trying this; and to get this, concentrating on one thing - a soothing thing, like the breath - is good for most people.

15 minutes? Ajahn Amaro recorded this one just for you!

https://www.amaravati.org/audio/medita ... rmanence/

It's a good general introduction, and I think it's also an excellent remedy for the confusion that comes from grappling with theory. Keep it simple!

Best wishes. :anjali:

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cappuccino
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by cappuccino » Sat Oct 20, 2018 8:15 pm

Inconstancy is very potent

More potent than anything else
Last edited by cappuccino on Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.

paul
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Location: Vietnam

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by paul » Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:06 pm

newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
So how do I realize Anicca practically (say, be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday). Are there any guided meditation teachings for newbies online (audio/video/books)?
This is absolutely the right approach and question, and to be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday can be achieved by making the effort to note indications of the dissolution phase of impermanence in the environment (dead trees etc.), because the primal tendency of the mind is to notice the growth elements (connected with the search for food etc.), so it takes exertion to overcome this. Everything that the practitioner looks at should be reconsidered in terms of it’s inevitable decay, as the first response of ‘grasping the new’ will be wrong. This response of dissolution can be strengthened by employing the three subjects of impermanence of the body from the first foundation of mindfulness as regular meditation subjects.
This is something the practitioner has to do themselves, there aren’t any resources at that level except what is implicit when impermanence and dissolution are mentioned in the suttas.
A further hurdle is the tendency towards mental matters in this computer age, which is seen here on DW in the frequent discussions of anatta in isolation, despite the Buddha's instruction that it is an effect of impermanence.

SarathW
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by SarathW » Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:03 am

I don't know where to start or what is the 'proper/traditional way' to go about.
Welcome to DW!
It is very simple. Start observing the five precepts.
That is your first lesson.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

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rightviewftw
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by rightviewftw » Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:10 am

newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
At the moment, I want to focus on Anicca as I feel this is something I can relate to and I hope that I'll develop a holistic understanding of the Buddha's teachings gradually.
I would say try reading some discourses, remember them and think about them as you sit down to contemplate, you can do it as a dialogue with yourself and see whether or not you come to an agreement. IE these passages;
Consciousness
"'Consciousness, consciousness': Thus is it said. To what extent, friend, is it said to be 'consciousness'?"

"'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus, friend, it is said to be 'consciousness.' And what does it cognize? It cognizes 'pleasant.' It cognizes 'painful.' It cognizes 'neither painful nor pleasant.' 'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus it is said to be 'consciousness.'"
As he was sitting there, the Blessed One said to him, "What do you think, Rahula — is the eye constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — are forms constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is consciousness at the eye constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."
"What do you think — whatever sense impressions arise in dependence on the eye are they constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is the ear constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the nose constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the tongue constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the body constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — are ideas constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is consciousness at the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is contact at the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."


"What do you think — whatever sensory impressions arise in dependence on the intellect: Is it constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."
I made changes to the text to simplify it but this is a valid way to train perception of impermanence.
However be advised that it might result in some weird results;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of impermanence and abiding much in it, gain, honour and fame keeps away, it shrinks and rolls away. The mind stretches out and gets established in equanimity or loathing
Therefore you might want to train the perception of equanimity along with the perception of impermanence.
you can do that by contemplating;
  • whatever is hard and has the property of hardness in the body as earth, comparing it to earth.
    whatever is airy, windy and has windy properties, comparing it to wind and likening it to wind.
    whatever is liquid in the body and has the property of being liquid-like, comparing it to water.
    whatever is fiery, warm in this body, comparing it to fire. IE digestion for heating etc
    whatever is spacious, spatial in this body, comparing it to space.
Do it thus;
"Rahula, develop the meditation in tune with earth. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people throw what is clean or unclean on the earth — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the earth is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with water. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people wash what is clean or unclean in water — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the water is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with fire. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when fire burns what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with wind. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when wind blows what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with space. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as space is not established anywhere, in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.
You can also compare those elements in terms of impermanence thus;
  • There comes a time when the planet earth is destroyed, how much more so is this bodily organs/flesh
    There comes a time when the oceans are dried up, how much more so is this bodily liquids
    There comes a time when the sun is extinguished, how much more so is this bodily warmth
    There comes a time when the winds on this planet stop blowing, how much more so is this bodily winds
    You can do the space too if you believe the big crunch theory
All this is basically contemplation and will establish you in the perception of impermanence very quickly, it is quite powerful stuff and 15 minutes a day is quite a lot for one perception.

Therefore i would advise you to consider a more comprehensive approach. IE

take up mindfulness of breathing, it will go well with perception training,
train giving gifts
meditate recollecting your own good deeds
train the perceptions of equanimity & altruistic joy
Moderation in food
Train yourself in keeping the 5 or 8 precepts

newbee
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:01 am

Sam Vara wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:42 pm
Hi,

Many people practice meditation for insight into impermanence by maintaining steady attention on phenomena, and observing how they change and pass away. There are many different methods for doing this, but lots of them are based on the Satipatthana Sutta

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/aut ... wayof.html

which recommends paying attention to the body, feelings, mind, and mental phenomena. It would probably be worth looking around and finding a guided meditation on line that you like, and which is at least in accord with the basic principles outlined in the sutta. One common practice that beginners often like is "sweeping" the body, paying attention to different parts in turn and observing the changes. It's worth mentioning that most teachers recommend that one develops a level of calm before trying this; and to get this, concentrating on one thing - a soothing thing, like the breath - is good for most people.

15 minutes? Ajahn Amaro recorded this one just for you!

https://www.amaravati.org/audio/medita ... rmanence/

It's a good general introduction, and I think it's also an excellent remedy for the confusion that comes from grappling with theory. Keep it simple!

Best wishes. :anjali:
Sam Vara, thank you very much for the guidance and resources. :thumbsup:
I'll read the Satipatthana discourse, and come back to discuss and learn.

newbee
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:03 am

cappuccino wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 8:15 pm
Inconstancy is very potent

More potent than anything else
Short and sweet. :)
Thanks mate.

newbee
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:06 am

paul wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:06 pm
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
So how do I realize Anicca practically (say, be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday). Are there any guided meditation teachings for newbies online (audio/video/books)?
This is absolutely the right approach and question, and to be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday can be achieved by making the effort to note indications of the dissolution phase of impermanence in the environment (dead trees etc.), because the primal tendency of the mind is to notice the growth elements (connected with the search for food etc.), so it takes exertion to overcome this. Everything that the practitioner looks at should be reconsidered in terms of it’s inevitable decay, as the first response of ‘grasping the new’ will be wrong. This response of dissolution can be strengthened by employing the three subjects of impermanence of the body from the first foundation of mindfulness as regular meditation subjects.
This is something the practitioner has to do themselves, there aren’t any resources at that level except what is implicit when impermanence and dissolution are mentioned in the suttas.
A further hurdle is the tendency towards mental matters in this computer age, which is seen here on DW in the frequent discussions of anatta in isolation, despite the Buddha's instruction that it is an effect of impermanence.
Oh! Yes, we focus, even celebrate, one aspect seen in the world but seldom think about change and decay, which are equally natural! I haven't looked at things from this perspective. You've introduced an entirely new line of thinking. :twothumbsup:
This response of dissolution can be strengthened by employing the three subjects of impermanence of the body from the first foundation of mindfulness as regular meditation subjects.
I'm not sure what the three subjects of impermanence of the body are. Could you elaborate.

newbee
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:07 am

SarathW wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:03 am
I don't know where to start or what is the 'proper/traditional way' to go about.
Welcome to DW!
It is very simple. Start observing the five precepts.
That is your first lesson.
:hello:
Thanks Sarath.

newbee
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by newbee » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:09 am

@rightviewftw

Thanks for taking the time to help me. This is perfect! I'm grateful. :bow:
I see some links in your signature : How to Meditate: Basic Satipatthana, How to Meditate: Mindfulness of Breathing. I'll go through these. Thanks again.
rightviewftw wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 4:10 am
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
At the moment, I want to focus on Anicca as I feel this is something I can relate to and I hope that I'll develop a holistic understanding of the Buddha's teachings gradually.
I would say try reading some discourses, remember them and think about them as you sit down to contemplate, you can do it as a dialogue with yourself and see whether or not you come to an agreement. IE these passages;
Consciousness
"'Consciousness, consciousness': Thus is it said. To what extent, friend, is it said to be 'consciousness'?"

"'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus, friend, it is said to be 'consciousness.' And what does it cognize? It cognizes 'pleasant.' It cognizes 'painful.' It cognizes 'neither painful nor pleasant.' 'It cognizes, it cognizes': Thus it is said to be 'consciousness.'"
As he was sitting there, the Blessed One said to him, "What do you think, Rahula — is the eye constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — are forms constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is consciousness at the eye constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."
"What do you think — whatever sense impressions arise in dependence on the eye are they constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is the ear constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the nose constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the tongue constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the body constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord" ...

"What do you think — is the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — are ideas constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is consciousness at the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"What do you think — is contact at the intellect constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."


"What do you think — whatever sensory impressions arise in dependence on the intellect: Is it constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."
I made changes to the text to simplify it but this is a valid way to train perception of impermanence.
However be advised that it might result in some weird results;
Bhikkhus, to the bhikkhu practicing the perception of impermanence and abiding much in it, gain, honour and fame keeps away, it shrinks and rolls away. The mind stretches out and gets established in equanimity or loathing
Therefore you might want to train the perception of equanimity along with the perception of impermanence.
you can do that by contemplating;
  • whatever is hard and has the property of hardness in the body as earth, comparing it to earth.
    whatever is airy, windy and has windy properties, comparing it to wind and likening it to wind.
    whatever is liquid in the body and has the property of being liquid-like, comparing it to water.
    whatever is fiery, warm in this body, comparing it to fire. IE digestion for heating etc
    whatever is spacious, spatial in this body, comparing it to space.
Do it thus;
"Rahula, develop the meditation in tune with earth. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people throw what is clean or unclean on the earth — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the earth is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with earth, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with water. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when people wash what is clean or unclean in water — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — the water is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with water, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with fire. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when fire burns what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with fire, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with wind. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as when wind blows what is clean or unclean — feces, urine, saliva, pus, or blood — it is not horrified, humiliated, or disgusted by it; in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with wind, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.

"Develop the meditation in tune with space. For when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind. Just as space is not established anywhere, in the same way, when you are developing the meditation in tune with space, agreeable & disagreeable sensory impressions that have arisen will not stay in charge of your mind.
You can also compare those elements in terms of impermanence thus;
  • There comes a time when the planet earth is destroyed, how much more so is this bodily organs/flesh
    There comes a time when the oceans are dried up, how much more so is this bodily liquids
    There comes a time when the sun is extinguished, how much more so is this bodily warmth
    There comes a time when the winds on this planet stop blowing, how much more so is this bodily winds
    You can do the space too if you believe the big crunch theory
All this is basically contemplation and will establish you in the perception of impermanence very quickly, it is quite powerful stuff and 15 minutes a day is quite a lot for one perception.

Therefore i would advise you to consider a more comprehensive approach. IE

take up mindfulness of breathing, it will go well with perception training,
train giving gifts
meditate recollecting your own good deeds
train the perceptions of equanimity & altruistic joy
Moderation in food
Train yourself in keeping the 5 or 8 precepts

paul
Posts: 1309
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 11:27 pm
Location: Vietnam

Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by paul » Sun Oct 21, 2018 10:39 am

newbee wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:06 am
Oh! Yes, we focus, even celebrate, one aspect seen in the world but seldom think about change and decay, which are equally natural! I haven't looked at things from this perspective. You've introduced an entirely new line of thinking. :twothumbsup:
We look at an apple to feel the shock of the new, but turn away from its discarded core or a decayed apple in the street feeling disgust. That response is innately conditioned by the unwholesome root of greed, but impermanence must be worked at until it develops its own feeling component, the gravity of seeing objects in a time-space. Continuity of a thing as it is, is an illusion which must be broken through, and that insight diverges from the view of the ordinary untaught worldling. These daily life observations are fortified by meditation on the impermanence of the body, and the body is the most effective teacher. Ven. Analayo describes the long-term effect of this practice:

“Continuity in developing awareness of impermanence is essential if it is really to affect one’s mental condition. Sustained contemplation of impermanence leads to a shift in one’s normal way of experiencing reality, which hitherto tacitly assumed the temporal stability of the perceiver and the perceived objects. Once both are experienced as changing processes, all notions of stable existence and substantiality vanish, thereby radically reshaping one’s paradigm of experience.”—-“Satipatthana”, Analayo.

Note: Maha Satipatthana sutta DN 22, Satipatthana sutta MN 10

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DooDoot
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by DooDoot » Sun Oct 21, 2018 11:32 am

newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
Hello all,

I'm a beginner and I'm learning about Buddhism.
Welcome :hello:

"Newbee" is an awesome and honest name because it means you won't create the suffering of believing you are an expert.
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
I read some of the forum posts and frankly speaking I feel intimidated by the depth of the discussions and the intricacies of Buddhist philosophy.
Its best to focus on what you want to learn. If you ask questions; I trust many members will be happy to do their best to answer them. Buddhism is actually a path of asking your own questions (rather than blindly attaching to teachings).
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
I'm not sure if I'm convinced about the various core beliefs of Buddhism. That's the result of being constantly bombarded by 'only what is factual/tangible exists. ( I'm struggling with concepts like re-birth,heavens-hells/realms ).
Buddhists like to claim they only deal in "facts" but Buddhism is loaded with unverifiable beliefs. I would encourage you to be unconcerned about this matter and jut focus on what you wish to learn.
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
Nevertheless, when I read the Buddha's discourses I find myself agreeing with portions of them, especially those which address issues that every human has to deal with sometime or other. I find the teaching of Anicca/impermanence relatable.
Excellent. The Pali suttas say there are two types of teachings: (i) mundane: and (ii) ultimate truth. Impermanence is an ultimate truth.
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
I don't know where to start or what is the 'proper/traditional way' to go about. At the moment, I want to focus on Anicca as I feel this is something I can relate to and I hope that I'll develop a holistic understanding of the Buddha's teachings gradually. So how do I realize Anicca practically (say, be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday). Are there any guided meditation teachings for newbies online (audio/video/books)?
The main meditation is called "Anapanasati", which means "mindfulness when/with breathing". You can start by watching the impermanence of every in-breath and every out-breath.
newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
( A word about my current capabilities: I don't have prior experience with meditation. I guess I could sit for perhaps 15 minutes to at most.. less than hour. Also, it's not possible for me to access teachers due to location/work-rel. issues, so that makes me a solitary, cyberspace practitioner. )
You should ensure you sit with a naturally erect spine; which means you might have to sit on a backless stool rather than sit cross-legged. Having a naturally erect and comfortable posture will allow you to sit longer. Sitting for 30 minutes each morning and each evening is great for starting.

Best wishes :smile:
Never ordained... not an anonymous-online-bhikkhu or ex-bhikkhu...

justindesilva
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by justindesilva » Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:51 pm

May I express my view on meditation for a beginner.
It is best to sit and count the inbreaths and outbreaths upto ten , say for about ten minutes each morning for sometime. After a few days the meditator will get accustomed to the system. Then watch the short breaths and long breaths.
Also watch the breath when in anger and slow it down on concentration counting one to ten and repeating.
Much more to say but a feeling of meditation will be experienced.

Dinsdale
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Re: Meditation for beginners - Anicca

Post by Dinsdale » Mon Oct 22, 2018 11:32 am

newbee wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:07 pm
So how do I realize Anicca practically (say, be aware of the transitory nature of life everyday). Are there any guided meditation teachings for newbies online (audio/video/books)?
You can start with the breath, then broaden awareness to other aspects of experience. I find it is easier to notice change.
Buddha save me from new-agers!

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