Favourite or Inspiring Suttas Given to Commoners

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mettafuture
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Favourite or Inspiring Suttas Given to Commoners

Post by mettafuture » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:39 pm

By "commoner" I mean householder, lay follower, wanderer, unspecified, etc.

While a lesson can undoubtedly be derived from every sutta, there are certain suttas that I often refer back to because they specifically address an issue pertaining to lay life. One such sutta is SN 55.7 (tr. Sujato), where the Buddha, among other things, outlines the golden rule in the framework of four of the training rules.

Excerpt:
I want to live and don’t want to die; I want to be happy and recoil from pain. Since this is so, if someone were to take my life, I wouldn’t like that. But others also want to live and don’t want to die; they want to be happy and recoil from pain. So if I were to take the life of someone else, they wouldn’t like that either. The thing that is disliked by me is also disliked by others. Since I dislike this thing, how can I inflict it on someone else?
Another is Snp 2.4 (tr. Brahmali/Ṭhānissaro), which succinctly enumerates thirty-eight fortunes or blessings to lead one to a higher spiritual attainment. I love this one.

Excerpt:
To be educated and to have a vocation,
To be well-trained in one’s chosen field,
And to speak words that are well-spoken:
This is the greatest good fortune.
What are some commoner suttas that stand out to you?

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mettafuture
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:13 pm

Re: Favourite or Inspiring Suttas Given to Commoners

Post by mettafuture » Thu Aug 09, 2018 8:45 pm

In the Anāthapiṇḍikovāda Sutta (MN 143), Sāriputta gives a dying Anāthapiṇḍika a deeply moving teaching on essentially letting go of everything. If possible, I'd like for this teaching to be read to me near the end of my life.

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