Cautious about practicing consistent vipassana with mental health issues?

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
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purist_andrew
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Re: Cautious about practicing consistent vipassana with mental health issues?

Post by purist_andrew » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:30 pm

rightviewftw wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:07 am
I am not familiar with the author you are quoting but any method where some of the practitioners end up in mental institutions sounds dodgy.

[snip]

Apart from the Corruptions of Insight i don't see what can go wrong if one is practicing correctly.
Hi RightView,

I am familiar with the basics of the progress of insight you have posted but some of these authors (Ingram, Mahasi, U Pandita) explain them in great detail. I understand from what I have read that knowing the experiences you can expect or are experiencing during meditation is helpful for the practitioner in his journey to Nibbana, to chart progress know what to expect next, and to validate to him or her that they are on the right path. Therefore, just as much as studying the suttas I want to know the ins and outs of the stages of meditation.

The author I mentioned, Ingram is one who says he has done something extreme by making the stages of insight very explicit in extreme detail, and he himself refers to Mahasi's Manual of Insight as a further reference for someone who has done the same as he himself (this book just came out last year and I have read some of it but not all). Something most Western dhamma books have not done for whatever reason.

...If you read Bhante G's Mindfulness in Plain English or some other meditation guides you might get the idea that the practice is very linear... that is, just keep practicing the same way for X years and you will attain Nibbana. However, it is apparent that the stages of progress are vastly different than each other, so it's good to know the "maps" as he calls them.

I think you are right about the four foundations of mindfulness to be practiced. I have some experience with anapanasati (as explained by Bhante G.) and to a lesser extent the Mahasi & U Pandita methods. I idealize to practice walking meditation outdoors maybe the home life as described in the suttas is a path of dust (as opposed to monastery the "open air", so can the outside be open air as well), your attention is scattered, but I don't want to ordain.

There are good Dhamma books about practicing a certain technique as primary and doing the rest of them in a secondary manner. I just want to know the stages of insight before I begin practice. I am too eager to practice to wait to finish study of the suttas to meditate, I will hopefully study mindfulness and have a more or less formal practice but as another poster said in this thread, daily life mindfulness (robertk said) while doing hobbies, work, etc, is possible. Personally I just need to try to let my speech stray from mindful speech as I have a tendency to indulge idle chatter during the day with friends and so on. The paramis are good as well. Also for me, to try to move away from idleness and towards diligence somewhat.

Thank you,
Andrew

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Re: Cautious about practicing consistent vipassana with mental health issues?

Post by purist_andrew » Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:33 pm

dylanj wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:30 am
If you are sane enough to read the Dhamma you are sane enough to practice it, & practicing it will remove whatever degree of insanity & mental illness you might have.
Hi Dylan,

I agree for the most part and this has been my experience. So this is why I was surprised by Ingram's warnings. In the past when I was skillful with meditation, it helped with my depression enormously and was helpful in healing from old substance abuse as well. For me, the last thing to consider is maybe opening to some non-Dhammic things, too, I get kind of obsessed and avoid mundane things. For example, as I mentioned in another post on this thread, having a craft for a layperson is mentioned as a blessing in the Maha Mangalla Sutta (Discourse on Blessings).

Edit: There is even a quote in either Mahasi or U Pandita's book, I think the latter, maybe the book "On the Path to Freedom" about how the minds of non-noble ones are a mess, and even that "satipatthana overcomes lunacy."

Thank you,
Andrew

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Re: Cautious about practicing consistent vipassana with mental health issues?

Post by rightviewftw » Sun Jun 24, 2018 9:26 pm

purist_andrew wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:30 pm
I just want to know the stages of insight before I begin practice. I am too eager to practice to wait to finish study of the suttas to meditate, I will hopefully study mindfulness and have a more or less formal practice but as another poster said in this thread, daily life mindfulness (robertk said) while doing hobbies, work, etc, is possible. Personally I just need to try to let my speech stray from mindful speech as I have a tendency to indulge idle chatter during the day with friends and so on. The paramis are good as well. Also for me, to try to move away from idleness and towards diligence somewhat.

Thank you,
Andrew
If i were to give general advice not knowing your personality i would make these points but keep in mind that i can only go on my own experience because i never trained others;

1. There is nothing wrong with just merely training concentration before one undertakes vipassana or mixing the two
2. It is not necessary to study the insight knowledges and the progression of insight because it is difficult to reconcile it with practical experience because insight is not something tangible like an idea, it is more like a faculty being developed and sharpened.
3. The Corruptions of Insight are good to know but here too one should also not expect anything in particular, when practiced correctly the meditator deals with them swiftly and they pose no problems. It is like this is pleasure, this is seeing [images], it's all just not so interesting and one moves on observing it arise and cease without getting caught up in it, as if they are nothing special and completely mundane as other phenomena.
4. Dry insight is not the only way
5. Manual of Insight is a good read nevertheless, as to what regards Insight Knowledges it might be problematic and cause more corruption of insight, this one in particular;
2. Clear, lucid, and distinct understanding of arising and passing away of mental and physical phenomena, as well as easily understanding the three characteristics due to reflection on them. One can begin to assume that the knowledge arose by itself due to observation of phenomena and not as result of reflection
If this happens one can note "knowing, knowing" or "speculating, speculating" or "suspecting, suspecting" if one is suspecting that an insight arose or " doubt, doubt" if doubting it, also one can note excitement or wanting, just isolate it as it appears to you so it can do no harm and keep going
I think the manual is very good anyway and id recommend it.

Also it is very good if you get a teacher to guide you because he can do interviews and make you pay attention to things that you might be missing by asking questions designed to make you look.

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Re: Cautious about practicing consistent vipassana with mental health issues?

Post by dylanj » Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:28 am

purist_andrew wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 7:33 pm
Hi Dylan,

I agree for the most part and this has been my experience. So this is why I was surprised by Ingram's warnings.
Ingram is far from trustworthy or a spiritual authority. & actually the notion that dhamma practice can be a problem for mental health is most common, I think, among westerners who tend towards a secularized, materialist Buddhism. It's based on a purely medical & not psychological or spiritual view of mental health. & I also notice it among Vajrayanists & some Mahāyānists in which case it might be true ;), because their practices can be very wild & untamed.
susukhaṁ vata nibbānaṁ,
sammā­sambud­dha­desitaṁ;
asokaṁ virajaṁ khemaṁ,
yattha dukkhaṁ nirujjhatī


Oh! extinction is so very blissful,
As taught by the One Rightly Self-Awakened:
Sorrowless, stainless, secure;
Where suffering all ceases


etaṁ santaṁ etaṁ paṇītaṁ yadidaṁ sabbasaṅkhārasamatho sabbūpadhipaṭi nissaggo taṇhakkhayo virāgo nirodho nibbānaṁ

This is peaceful, this is excellent, that is: the stilling of all preparations, the relinquishment of all attachments, the destruction of craving, detachment, cessation, extinction.

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