New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

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aflatun
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New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by aflatun » Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:25 pm

The Silent Sages of Old: Suttas from the Suttanipāta
The Editor's Introduction wrote:This small selection of Suttas is by no means comparably small in its importance and significance. For the realization of Dhamma is beyond any descriptive words or concepts: truth is not subject to measurement, comparison or classification. The Buddha and his noble disciples were skilled in the use of words as a means to guide seekers toward the very same realization of Dhamma that they had experienced – to a liberation from all troubles and burdens – but there is not always a need for elaborate explanation of all that one might experience in life. Rather, more meaningful is that which words inspire: the courage to go ‘against the stream’ of the world, and to put aside its mundane values. To move to silent abodes, forests or mountains, where silence and solitude afford the space to uncover hidden weaknesses, and where there may develop an opportunity to examine and understand the phenomena of subjective experience at a most fundamental and universal level. In short, the invitation implicit in these Suttas is to actually do the work which can bear the fruit of liberation.

The book presented here thus contains words which perhaps touch the deep truths of life in a most condensed way. The silent sages of the past were not interested in speculative studies, nor were they concerned with any kind of accumulation, either mental or physical. That was their nature. But they were, perhaps, in their individual ways, appreciative of some few words of the Buddha which they had come to hold in their hearts, and to recite regularly among shady trees, mossy rocks or calming streams – thus bringing the Buddha close to themselves (Cf. Itivuttaka 92).

But this translation does not just honor the old hermits of a distant and forgotten era, when monks used to live close to nature and its dangers. This translation was actually made by just such a sagely hermit of the present age, living in a remote and simple jungle three-walled hut. He is living proof that real striving to be closer to the Dhamma is still a present reality. Moreover, the translator’s skill with the Pali language, perfected to a high scholarly level, has become, after almost five decades of secluded life, even part of his thinking mind. His remarkable linguistic expertise and precision speaks for itself in the pages that follow, confirming his remarkable qualification to translate those ancient words into a modern language. This fact alone makes The Silent Sages of Old of great value, a book that can rightly be treasured.

The Venerable Translator and all other forest monks and friends who have been involved in this project wish to join in the spirit of the Silent Sages and therefore remain anonymous.
"People often get too quick to say 'there's no self. There's no self...no self...no self.' There is self, there is focal point, its not yours. That's what not self is."

Ninoslav Ñāṇamoli
Senses and the Thought-1, 42:53

"Those who create constructs about the Buddha,
Who is beyond construction and without exhaustion,
Are thereby damaged by their constructs;
They fail to see the Thus-Gone.

That which is the nature of the Thus-Gone
Is also the nature of this world.
There is no nature of the Thus-Gone.
There is no nature of the world."

Nagarjuna
MMK XXII.15-16

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SDC
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by SDC » Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:56 pm

I've already read a few of these and they are very well done. Bravo to all those involved, and to Path Press for offering yet another great title free of charge.

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Sam Vara
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Sam Vara » Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:58 pm

A wonderful bit in the publicity materials in the linked site:
-Translated by the anonymous hermit-monk -

"I couldn't think of anyone more qualified to do the translation" (Ven. Bhikkhu Anandajoti)
:jumping:

binocular
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by binocular » Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm

aflatun wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:25 pm
The Silent Sages of Old: Suttas from the Suttanipāta
The Editor's Introduction wrote:This small selection of Suttas is by no means comparably small in its importance and significance. For the realization of Dhamma is beyond any descriptive words or concepts: truth is not subject to measurement, comparison or classification. The Buddha and his noble disciples were skilled in the use of words as a means to guide seekers toward the very same realization of Dhamma that they had experienced – to a liberation from all troubles and burdens – but there is not always a need for elaborate explanation of all that one might experience in life. Rather, more meaningful is that which words inspire: the courage to go ‘against the stream’ of the world, and to put aside its mundane values. To move to silent abodes, forests or mountains, where silence and solitude afford the space to uncover hidden weaknesses, and where there may develop an opportunity to examine and understand the phenomena of subjective experience at a most fundamental and universal level.
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?

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Will
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Will » Wed Mar 07, 2018 8:41 pm

binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm

How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?
The Preface by the translator clarifies the purpose & the intended audience.
This translation was made for the benefit of those who want to
make the Suttanipāta a source of inspiration for their daily practice—
especially those who live in the forest and want to follow
in the steps of the Munis (Sages) of old
. Probably only those who
have fully familiarized themselves with the Suttapiṭaka in Pali
will be able to make sense of some parts of it.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- AN 10.1

paul
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by paul » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:51 pm

binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm
the courage to go ‘against the stream’ of the world, and to put aside its mundane values. To move to silent abodes, forests or mountains, where silence and solitude afford the space to uncover hidden weaknesses, and where there may develop an opportunity to examine and understand the phenomena of subjective experience at a most fundamental and universal level.
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?

'Going against the stream of the world' is necessary for Buddhist practice, and the difficulties of being involved in the world can be a strengthening factor for insight. To achieve this, there needs to be a balance between time in the world and contemplative time, and a framework of doctrine within which to understand external experience. Wilderness experience is an essential foundation of Buddhist practice, and the practitioner must exert effort and include it regularly as best they can.

davidbrainerd
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by davidbrainerd » Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:27 am

binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?
If one wants to live in the world and of the world, as a womanwhore or manwhore, then it has no relevance. If one is forced to live in the world but does not want to be of the world, and especially intends to peruse a celibate life, then it has relevance.

chownah
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by chownah » Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:05 am

binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm
aflatun wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:25 pm
The Silent Sages of Old: Suttas from the Suttanipāta
The Editor's Introduction wrote:This small selection of Suttas is by no means comparably small in its importance and significance. For the realization of Dhamma is beyond any descriptive words or concepts: truth is not subject to measurement, comparison or classification. The Buddha and his noble disciples were skilled in the use of words as a means to guide seekers toward the very same realization of Dhamma that they had experienced – to a liberation from all troubles and burdens – but there is not always a need for elaborate explanation of all that one might experience in life. Rather, more meaningful is that which words inspire: the courage to go ‘against the stream’ of the world, and to put aside its mundane values. To move to silent abodes, forests or mountains, where silence and solitude afford the space to uncover hidden weaknesses, and where there may develop an opportunity to examine and understand the phenomena of subjective experience at a most fundamental and universal level.
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?
Never judge a book by the cover.....or the editor's introduction....
chownah

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Will
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Will » Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:00 am

This one for example, is fitted for city dweller or forest wanderer.

4.10. BEFORE THE BREAKUP [848–861], first six verses...
1. How seeing and how conducting oneself
is one said to be ‘at peace’?
This do tell me, O Gotama,
being asked about the supreme man.

2. With craving gone before the break-up,
not leaning back on the past,
not reckonable in the middle
there is nothing put in front of him.

3. Free of anger, not given to fear,
not boastful, free of wrong-doings,
talking considerately, not agitated,
he is a Muni regarding speech.

4. He has no longing for the future,
he does not sorrow over the past.
Seeing how to stay aloof in present contacts
he is not led in among the views.

5. Keeping withdrawn, not deceitful,
not envious, not avaricious,
unobtrusive, not repulsive,
he does not engage in slander.

6. Not attracted to pleasant things,
not given to arrogance,
he is gentle and resourceful,
not going by faith and not trying to get detached.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- AN 10.1

Virgo
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Virgo » Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:06 am

binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?
Oh there is much in here for lay or ordained.

Kevin

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Mkoll
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Mkoll » Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:46 am

aflatun wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:25 pm
The Silent Sages of Old: Suttas from the Suttanipāta
The Editor's Introduction wrote:This small selection of Suttas is by no means comparably small in its importance and significance. For the realization of Dhamma is beyond any descriptive words or concepts: truth is not subject to measurement, comparison or classification. The Buddha and his noble disciples were skilled in the use of words as a means to guide seekers toward the very same realization of Dhamma that they had experienced – to a liberation from all troubles and burdens – but there is not always a need for elaborate explanation of all that one might experience in life. Rather, more meaningful is that which words inspire: the courage to go ‘against the stream’ of the world, and to put aside its mundane values. To move to silent abodes, forests or mountains, where silence and solitude afford the space to uncover hidden weaknesses, and where there may develop an opportunity to examine and understand the phenomena of subjective experience at a most fundamental and universal level. In short, the invitation implicit in these Suttas is to actually do the work which can bear the fruit of liberation.

The book presented here thus contains words which perhaps touch the deep truths of life in a most condensed way. The silent sages of the past were not interested in speculative studies, nor were they concerned with any kind of accumulation, either mental or physical. That was their nature. But they were, perhaps, in their individual ways, appreciative of some few words of the Buddha which they had come to hold in their hearts, and to recite regularly among shady trees, mossy rocks or calming streams – thus bringing the Buddha close to themselves (Cf. Itivuttaka 92).

But this translation does not just honor the old hermits of a distant and forgotten era, when monks used to live close to nature and its dangers. This translation was actually made by just such a sagely hermit of the present age, living in a remote and simple jungle three-walled hut. He is living proof that real striving to be closer to the Dhamma is still a present reality. Moreover, the translator’s skill with the Pali language, perfected to a high scholarly level, has become, after almost five decades of secluded life, even part of his thinking mind. His remarkable linguistic expertise and precision speaks for itself in the pages that follow, confirming his remarkable qualification to translate those ancient words into a modern language. This fact alone makes The Silent Sages of Old of great value, a book that can rightly be treasured.

The Venerable Translator and all other forest monks and friends who have been involved in this project wish to join in the spirit of the Silent Sages and therefore remain anonymous.
Thank you for sharing this.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa

binocular
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by binocular » Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:25 pm

davidbrainerd wrote:
Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:27 am
binocular wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:04 pm
How can this be relevant to us, living in the world?
If one wants to live in the world and of the world, as a womanwhore or manwhore, then it has no relevance. If one is forced to live in the world but does not want to be of the world, and especially intends to peruse a celibate life, then it has relevance.
How? I think it would be naive to live in the world by the principles given in the Sutta Nipata. I don't mean to be unnecessarily critical, but I really do doubt the usefulness of such instructions and principles for lays. All I can see is that living that way out in the world, one will get squished by the world.

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Sam Vara
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Sam Vara » Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:45 pm

binocular wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:25 pm
I think it would be naive to live in the world by the principles given in the Sutta Nipata. I don't mean to be unnecessarily critical, but I really do doubt the usefulness of such instructions and principles for lays. All I can see is that living that way out in the world, one will get squished by the world.
Have a look at the pdf linked. If you can find anything of use in, say, the Dhammapada, then the Sutta Nipata should be similarly interesting. There are bits in both, and elsewhere of course, that do not apply to lay discipleship or practice, but these bits are in a minority.

binocular
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by binocular » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:30 pm

Sam Vara wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:45 pm
Have a look at the pdf linked.
Thank you, I am subscribed to PathPress' news announcements and I've known about this new publication before it was refered to here.

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Sam Vara
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Re: New Translation: Suttas from the Suttanipāta

Post by Sam Vara » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:40 pm

binocular wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:30 pm
Sam Vara wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:45 pm
Have a look at the pdf linked.
Thank you, I am subscribed to PathPress' news announcements and I've known about this new publication before it was refered to here.
Excellent! You've probably had the opportunity to study it in some depth, then. Can you find in it nothing but principles by which it would be impossible to live an unsquished lay life?

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