What are these 2 set of words?

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JC938
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Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:17 pm

What are these 2 set of words?

Post by JC938 » Sat Feb 17, 2018 3:23 pm

Hi,

I have occasionally heard both of these.

Sila, samadhi, panna

and

dana, sila, bhavana

I know the meaning of all the words, but for what purpose they are for, for both, I don't remember to what question the first is answered and to what question the 2nd is answered.

Thank you.

EDIT: and is bhavana and samadhi same? Or is bhavana include praying/chanting aswell. thanks.

dharmacorps
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Re: What are these 2 set of words?

Post by dharmacorps » Sat Feb 17, 2018 6:03 pm

You may have to be a little more specific or detailed in your question because I am not sure what you are asking exactly. Bhavana tends to mean "cultivation" or "practice" (meditation, chanting, etc), and "samadhi" is a state of concentration that may come from practicing.

santa100
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Re: What are these 2 set of words?

Post by santa100 » Sat Feb 17, 2018 8:04 pm

JC938 wrote:I have occasionally heard both of these.

Sila, samadhi, panna

and

dana, sila, bhavana
They're all aspects of Dhamma cultivation, but being used in different context. Sila, samadhi, panna are the Threefold Training that are implemented thru the Eightfold Noble Path:
MN 44 wrote:The three aggregates are not included under the noble eightfold path, friend Visakha, but the noble eightfold path is included under the three aggregates. Right speech, right action, & right livelihood come under the aggregate of virtue. Right effort, right mindfulness, & right concentration come under the aggregate of concentration. Right view & right resolve come under the aggregate of discernment."
Dana, sila, deva are among the Six Recollections being implemented during the Uposatha (ref: AN 3.70)

paul
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Re: What are these 2 set of words?

Post by paul » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:41 pm

The threefold division of the Noble Eightfold Path, sila, samadhi and panna,has a dynamic relationship one to the next. Sila is a necessary prerequisite
for successful samadhi, and samadhi necessary for successful insight.

Also they oppose the defilements in different ways:

“Before we turn to the development of wisdom, it will be helpful to inquire why concentration is not adequate to the attainment of liberation. Concentration does not suffice to bring liberation because it fails to touch the defilements at their fundamental level. The Buddha teaches that the defilements are stratified into three layers: the stage of latent tendency, the stage of manifestation, and the stage of transgression. The most deeply grounded is the level of latent tendency (anusaya), where a defilement merely lies dormant without displaying any activity. The second level is the stage of manifestation (pariyutthana), where a defilement, through the impact of some stimulus, surges up in the form of unwholesome thoughts, emotions, and volitions. Then, at the third level, the defilement passes beyond a purely mental manifestation to motivate some unwholesome action of body or speech. Hence this level is called the stage of transgression (vitikkama).
The three divisions of the Noble Eightfold Path provide the check against this threefold layering of the defilements. The first, the training in moral discipline, restrains unwholesome bodily and verbal activity and thus prevents defilements from reaching the stage of transgression. The training in concentration provides the safeguard against the stage of manifestation. It removes already manifest defilements and protects the mind from their continued influx. But even though concentration may be pursued to the depths of full absorption, it cannot touch the basic source of affliction — the latent tendencies lying dormant in the mental continuum. Against these concentration is powerless, since to root them out calls for more than mental calm. What it calls for, beyond the composure and serenity of the unified mind, is wisdom (pañña), a penetrating vision of phenomena in their fundamental mode of being.”—-“The Noble Eightfold Path”, Bikkhu Bodhi.

Dana, sila and bhavana is a substitute grouping used by laypeople in Buddhist countries where serious meditation is left to the monks.

JC938
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Re: What are these 2 set of words?

Post by JC938 » Sat Feb 17, 2018 11:46 pm

Thanks.

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