Have I got this right?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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BlueLotus
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Have I got this right?

Post by BlueLotus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:01 am

Basically, follow your breath in and out and do this until you feel totally relaxed and as if ur body's not there and then whatever the heck that comes up, reflect that it is impermanent, suffering and no self. Do this for some 7+ years and some day, realization will hit you but you should not, at any point, force it.

Have I got it right?

DooDoot
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by DooDoot » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:23 am

In the full method of Anapanasati, in following the breath, it can be seen directly the breath itself is impermanent, will cause suffering if attached to & is not-self. There is no need to wait for whatever the heck that comes up. Viewing the impermanence of each individual breath and the nuances (different vibrations) within each individual breath should be sufficient to keep the mind the present moment, not forcing it & have some realisation.

However, what you described in your post has been called a "short cut method' of Anapanasati:
THE SHORT CUT METHOD FOR ORDINARY PEOPLE

We will begin by speaking for those who do not like "a lot." By the words "a lot" they seem to mean too much or surplus. Well, the surplus is not necessary. We will take just what is sufficient for ordinary people, which we call "the short cut method." The essence of this method is to concentrate the mind adequately, just enough, which any ordinary person can do, and then take that concentrated citta to observe aniccam-dukkham-anatta - the three characteristics of being - until realizing sunyata and tathata. With this practice they will realize the benefits of samadhi just the same. They will get the fun-scale result of extinguishing dukkha, but there will not be any special qualities in addition to that. Such special abilities are not necessary anyway. So make the mind sufficiently concentrated, then go examine aniccam-dukkham-anatta. Just practice the first tetrad of Anapanasati sufficiently then practice the fourth tetrad sufficiently. That is all! Sufficient is not a lot, nor is it complete, but it is good enough. This is the short cut for ordinary people. (C. 3)

Now we will look at the method of practicing the first tetrad. Make the breath fine and the entire .body will be subtle, that is, tranquil and cool. Just this much is sufficient for having a mind good enough to do vipassana. Then the citta is on a level that it can use to contemplate aniccam-dukkham-anatta that manifests in every part and particle of our bodies. The impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and selflessness of every organ and component in our bodies – both concrete and mental - are contemplated until realizing suchness. When suchness is seen we do not fall under the power of dualism. That is enough. This much is enough to penetrate higher and higher into the Dhamma until realizing the highest. This is the short cut for ordinary people. Those living in the common, ordinary world – even those living the household life - are able to do at least this much. (C. 4)

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikk ... athing.htm

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_anicca_
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by _anicca_ » Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:45 am

You concentrate on the breath until you reach samadhi.

Stay in samadhi for as long as possible because it will etch away at your desires.

Once you come out of samadhi, then reflect.
"A virtuous monk, Kotthita my friend, should attend in an appropriate way to the five clinging-aggregates as inconstant, stressful, a disease, a cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a dissolution, an emptiness, not-self."

:buddha1:

http://vipassanameditation.asia

Saengnapha
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by Saengnapha » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:46 am

DooDoot wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:23 am
In the full method of Anapanasati, in following the breath, it can be seen directly the breath itself is impermanent, will cause suffering if attached to & is not-self. There is no need to wait for whatever the heck that comes up. Viewing the impermanence of each individual breath and the nuances (different vibrations) within each individual breath should be sufficient to keep the mind the present moment, not forcing it & have some realisation.

However, what you described in your post has been called a "short cut method' of Anapanasati:
THE SHORT CUT METHOD FOR ORDINARY PEOPLE

We will begin by speaking for those who do not like "a lot." By the words "a lot" they seem to mean too much or surplus. Well, the surplus is not necessary. We will take just what is sufficient for ordinary people, which we call "the short cut method." The essence of this method is to concentrate the mind adequately, just enough, which any ordinary person can do, and then take that concentrated citta to observe aniccam-dukkham-anatta - the three characteristics of being - until realizing sunyata and tathata. With this practice they will realize the benefits of samadhi just the same. They will get the fun-scale result of extinguishing dukkha, but there will not be any special qualities in addition to that. Such special abilities are not necessary anyway. So make the mind sufficiently concentrated, then go examine aniccam-dukkham-anatta. Just practice the first tetrad of Anapanasati sufficiently then practice the fourth tetrad sufficiently. That is all! Sufficient is not a lot, nor is it complete, but it is good enough. This is the short cut for ordinary people. (C. 3)

Now we will look at the method of practicing the first tetrad. Make the breath fine and the entire .body will be subtle, that is, tranquil and cool. Just this much is sufficient for having a mind good enough to do vipassana. Then the citta is on a level that it can use to contemplate aniccam-dukkham-anatta that manifests in every part and particle of our bodies. The impermanence, unsatisfactoriness, and selflessness of every organ and component in our bodies – both concrete and mental - are contemplated until realizing suchness. When suchness is seen we do not fall under the power of dualism. That is enough. This much is enough to penetrate higher and higher into the Dhamma until realizing the highest. This is the short cut for ordinary people. Those living in the common, ordinary world – even those living the household life - are able to do at least this much. (C. 4)

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikk ... athing.htm
If it was that easy, you would see an awful lot of awakened Buddhists similar to the Neo Advaitins who have had an insight or two and are now endowed with teaching credentials, satsangs, and, selling the secrets by subscription. Hard to believe in this kind of stuff.

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BlueLotus
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by BlueLotus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:08 am

_anicca_ wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:45 am
You concentrate on the breath until you reach samadhi.

Stay in samadhi for as long as possible because it will etch away at your desires.

Once you come out of samadhi, then reflect.
See, that's the question. Should I reflect by asking my mind a question or should I just let it be and wait for something to come up? I hope you get what I mean...

befriend
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by befriend » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:54 pm

Ajahn passano of abhayagiri has talks on practicing the 16 steps of Buddhas instruction on mindfulness of breathing I plan to start listening to the talks today.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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BlueLotus
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by BlueLotus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:01 pm

befriend wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:54 pm
Ajahn passano of abhayagiri has talks on practicing the 16 steps of Buddhas instruction on mindfulness of breathing I plan to start listening to the talks today.
U got a link man?

befriend
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by befriend » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:05 pm

Bodom had a post in 2009 called Ajahn passano talks on Anapanasati it pops up in the first listing in google
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

befriend
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by befriend » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:11 pm

nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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BlueLotus
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by BlueLotus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:48 pm

Thank you so much!
:anjali:

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_anicca_
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by _anicca_ » Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:08 am

You can do either one.

Ask a question before meditation and then after.

See what comes up!
"A virtuous monk, Kotthita my friend, should attend in an appropriate way to the five clinging-aggregates as inconstant, stressful, a disease, a cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a dissolution, an emptiness, not-self."

:buddha1:

http://vipassanameditation.asia

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Aloka
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by Aloka » Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:32 am

.

Hi BlueLotus,

Ajahn Sumedho talks about Anapanasati practice here:

https://www.dhammatalks.net/Articles/Aj ... reath.htm



:anjali:

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BlueLotus
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Re: Have I got this right?

Post by BlueLotus » Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:30 pm

_anicca_ wrote:
Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:08 am
You can do either one.

Ask a question before meditation and then after.

See what comes up!
Can u pls elaborate?
:coffee:

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