satipattana

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DooDoot
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Re: satipattana

Post by DooDoot » Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:36 am

BlueLotus wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:58 pm
No no the question I have is not whether I drop the breath but how to practice satipattana while focusing on the breath
Also, how to practice satipattana while focusing on the breath is as follows:
.... strives to burn up defile­ments, comprehends readily (according to Right View) and is mindful in order to abandon all liking and disliking....

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikk ... athing.htm
Therefore, it sounds like how to practice satipattana while focusing on the breath is to focus on the breathing without liking & disliking; without greed, hatred & delusion, which includes without clinging to the breathing as 'self', according to Right View.
In this way he remains focused internally on the body in & of itself, or externally on the body in & of itself, or both internally & externally on the body in & of itself. Or he remains focused on the phenomenon of origination with regard to the body, on the phenomenon of passing away with regard to the body, or on the phenomenon of origination & passing away with regard to the body. Or his mindfulness that 'There is a body' is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance. And he remains independent, not clinging to anything in the world. This is how a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself.

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitak ... .than.html

chownah
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Re: satipattana

Post by chownah » Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:19 am

DooDoot wrote:
Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:17 am
BlueLotus wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:58 pm
No no the question I have is not whether I drop the breath but how to practice satipattana while focusing on the breath
At least the instructions in the Anapanasati Sutta seem to literally say to keep watching (and calming) the breath until rapture arises. When rapture arises, the 2nd satipatthana (tetrad) begins, where rapture (a pleasant feeling) is observed together with the breathing. Then when rapture is calmed, the 3rd satipatthana (tetrad) begins, where the mind & the breathing are watched together. Therefore, it sounds like you have to keep watching the breathing until rapture arises. If rapture never arises then you only practise one satipatthana.
FIRST TETRAD
(1) While breathing in long he fully comprehends: I breathe in long. While breathing out long he fully comprehends: I breathe out long. 16

(2) While breathing in short he fully comprehends: I breathe in short. While breathing out short he fully comprehends: I breathe out short.

(3) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing all bodies I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing all bodies I shall breathe out.17

(4) He trains himself: calming the body-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: calming the body-conditioner I shall breathe out.18

SECOND TETRAD

(5) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing piti (rapture) I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing piti I shall breathe out.

(6) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing sukha (happiness) I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing sukha I shall breathe out.

(7) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind-conditioner I shall breathe out.19

(8) He trains himself: calming the mind-conditioner I shall breathe in. He trains himself: calming the mind-conditioner I shall breathe out. 20

THIRD TETRAD

(9) He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: thoroughly experiencing the mind I shall breathe out. 21

(10) He trains himself: gladdening the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: gladdening the mind I shall breathe out. 22

(11) He trains himself: concentrating the mind I shall breathe in. He trains himself: concentrating the mind I shall breathe out.23

(12) He trains himself: liberating the mind I shall breathe in.

FOURTH TETRAD

(13) He trains himself; constantly contemplating impermanence I shall breathe in. He trains himself; constantly contemplating impermanence I shall breathe out. 25

(14) He trains himself; constantly contemplating fading away I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating fading away I shall breathe out. 26

(15) He trains himself: constantly contemplating quenching I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating quenching I shall breathe out. 27

(16) He trains himself: constantly contemplating tossing back I shall breathe in. He trains himself: constantly contemplating tossing back I shall breathe out. 28

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikk ... athing.htm
I fixed the link at the bottom.
chownah

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Cittasanto
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Re: satipattana

Post by Cittasanto » Fri Nov 10, 2017 3:04 am

BlueLotus wrote:
Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:00 am
Why is satipattana important? Isn't it the anapanasati that the Buddha asked to follow?
Satipatthana is important because it fulfils many of the wings to awakening in and of itself.
Both are advised, However, as some Bhikkhu's (Ajahn Sujato, Bhikkhu Analayo) have argued the Satipatthana has undergone an expansion over time, and I find this compelling. I would recommend both of Bhikkhu Analayo's books on the subject of Satipatthana as his arguments are more convincing/practicable.

Satipatthana the direct path to realisation. https://www.buddhismuskunde.uni-hamburg ... t-path.pdf

Perspectives of Satipatthana. https://www.buddhismuskunde.uni-hamburg ... ctives.pdf

Dy firrinagh focklagh
In truth
Cittasanto
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