A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Mr Man
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by Mr Man » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:59 pm

Aloka wrote:
When I said in my previous posts that I followed the teachings of Ajahn Sumedho and Ajahn Amaro, I meant actually attending their talks, taking part in question and answer sessions afterwards,and also speaking to them personally during the breaks.

Yes and that would give you much more of an appreciation of their teaching and where it is coming from (the tradition, which is as I said essentially Buddhist monasticism) than reading a book or listening to a tape. Because to an extent you are entering the context of the teaching, all in my opinion.

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Aloka
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by Aloka » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:44 pm

Mr Man wrote:
Aloka wrote:
When I said in my previous posts that I followed the teachings of Ajahn Sumedho and Ajahn Amaro, I meant actually attending their talks, taking part in question and answer sessions afterwards,and also speaking to them personally during the breaks.

Yes and that would give you much more of an appreciation of their teaching and where it is coming from (the tradition, which is as I said essentially Buddhist monasticism) than reading a book or listening to a tape. Because to an extent you are entering the context of the teaching, all in my opinion.
Yes, I agree - and of course while one is listening and interacting with the teachings, one is also in the company of other practitioners, which includes laypeople, monks and nuns.

:anjali:

ToVincent
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by ToVincent » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:57 pm

mikenz66 wrote:Much of what has came to us from Sri Lanka last century was communicated by people with German, British, and American cultural backgrounds (Nyanatiloka, Nyanaponika, Nanamoli, Nanavira, Bodhi, etc).
There are also people, a bit less braggart, that have done a great job in the 19th, and even in the 18th century.

Have you ever heard an Indian bragging about having invented something? They even let people steal from them; without saying a thing.
Some people are like that. They don't have to show off; or to sell something (mercantile). They are just self-satisfied with what they have achieved.
This is usually of a higher content.
In this world with its ..., Māras, ... in this population with its ascetics.... (AN 5.30).
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We are all possessed - more or less.
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And what, bhikkhu, is inward rottenness? Here someone is immoral, one of evil character, of impure and suspect behaviour, secretive in his acts, no ascetic though claiming to be one, not a celibate though claiming to be one, inwardly rotten, corrupt, depraved. This is called inward rottenness.”
SN 35.241
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https://justpaste.it/j5o4

shaunc
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by shaunc » Thu Sep 22, 2016 7:24 am

I find it interesting that he believes the 5th precept is the most important (alcohol/drugs). I personally don't have a dog in this fight but I do find that this is the most controversial of the precepts among westerners.
I suppose I was a bit luckier than most as I'd already left that part of my life behind 3 or 4 years before I discovered Buddhism.

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lyndon taylor
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by lyndon taylor » Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:28 am

His reasoning for saying the 5th precept was the most important is because breaking the 5th precept could lead you to break the other 4, for instance you're probably not going to go off and kill someone unless drugs or alcohol is involved, at least that, as I understand it, was his reasoning.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

davidbrainerd
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by davidbrainerd » Thu Sep 22, 2016 7:04 pm

lyndon taylor wrote:His reasoning for saying the 5th precept was the most important is because breaking the 5th precept could lead you to break the other 4, for instance you're probably not going to go off and kill someone unless drugs or alcohol is involved, at least that, as I understand it, was his reasoning.
Absolutely. People in Buddhism arguing against freewill existing, people in Christianity pretending morality is sooooo hard so we need justification to be by faith alone because morality is just soooooo hard its impossible....its because they're drunks (or are trying to accomodate drunks). Sober people know they can live morally because they're doing it.

shaunc
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by shaunc » Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:13 pm

lyndon taylor wrote:His reasoning for saying the 5th precept was the most important is because breaking the 5th precept could lead you to break the other 4, for instance you're probably not going to go off and kill someone unless drugs or alcohol is involved, at least that, as I understand it, was his reasoning.
That does make sense. Most of us have felt angry towards someone at some point but if you're sober you're unlikely to act on it but if you're drunk you could very well end up regretting it.

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lyndon taylor
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Re: A trip to the Cambodian Buddhist Temple

Post by lyndon taylor » Thu Jan 18, 2018 1:30 pm

I thought I'd bump up this old thread of mine, and invite anyone that hasn't read the OP post about my visit to the local Cambodian Temple where I was briefly a monk about 20 years ago. Its interesting that the former monk at the temple believes we have a spirit that goes on after death, and believes in reincarnation, not really rebirth, and has some really profound takes on the importance of the 5 precepts, give it a read and feel free to comment, sincerely Former Monk John, as my Monk name was John, (they couldn't pronounce Lyndon!!)
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

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