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Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 1:28 am
by DooDoot
ieee23 wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2016 12:28 pm
Is there a sutta that explains why people do not remember their past lives?
SN 22.79 explains remembering "past lives" in a way that is easily practised.

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 5:33 am
by salayatananirodha

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:09 am
by anthbrown84
JohnK wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:03 pm
ieee23 wrote:Is there a sutta that explains why people do not remember their past lives?
Per Bhikkhu Bodhi, recollection of past lives is very advanced (not something most people can do), and not even essential for arhantship.


The jhānas and the formless attainments by themselves do not issue in enlightenment and liberation. Though lofty and peaceful, they can only silence the defilements that sustain the round of rebirths but cannot eradicate them. To uproot the defilements at the most fundamental level, and thereby arrive at enlightenment and liberation, the meditative process must be directed to a third line of development. This is the contemplation of “things as they really are,” which results in increasingly deeper insights into the nature of existence and culminates in the final goal, the attainment of arahantship.


This is from Intro to Part VII of In the Buddha's Words.
http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/buddhas- ... liberation

I just want to say I disagree with Bikkhu Bodhi and this line of reasoning. I think if Jhana is practised as stated in The Sutta, then they can and do lead directly to liberation. The links of dependent origination are there to see in plain site (of mind)... vibrating away, a letting go away from causing liberation.

Jhana as in the commentaries, i.e. absorption, does not (by amost buddhist accounts) lead to liberation... and this in my view, is where Bikkhu Bodhi is correct. The word Jhana has lost its meaning and is now meaning absorption, which seems to be no different from what the Brahmic religions practise.....

Anthony

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:25 am
by pitakele
Ven. Ñāṇavimala, an accomplished practitioner, related these recollections of past lives
One day Bhante said that in the past, not only did he perform wholesome activities, but unwholesome ones as well. He was having migraine headaches even after becoming a monk, and wanted to know the cause. He told me that after a deep meditation, he realized what had happened in the past to make him suffer so much from migraine: during the time of the Crusades, he was a German soldier and there was a battle with the Romans in a German village. One Roman soldier, short in height, approached him and he gave a blow to his head with the club which killed him.

Then in the life after, he was in the Army again and this time he fell from the horse he was riding and had injuries. He could remember lying down, near a monument, taking his last breath and thinking, ‘Why did all this happen to me and why did I join the Army?’ He then passed away, as did his horse.

In another life, he remembered he was in a church during a battle. Fire surrounded the church and he could not get out. Through the window he saw the bell ringer jumping from the tower. He too jumped out, was injured and died. Afterwards he became a ghost, and whilst roaming around he saw the villagers coming to put the fire out. They saw him as a ghost. He was shy and slipped away to another place where he met a friend who was also a ghost and they had this brief conversation, ‘Ah! You are here?’ ‘Yes I am also here.’

In a recent previous life, he remembered he was a farmer and was arranging hay at a high place in a barn. He fell and had a serious head injury and, as he was taking his last breath, he saw his two children and wife weeping and crying. He mentioned that the sight was devastating.

So it shows after the first incident of killing the Roman soldier, in his following lives he always had head injuries or died, and in this life he suffered from migraine headaches.

He mentioned he faintly remembers in one life he was writing books, probably Dhamma books, and in another life he was going on piṇḍapāta, but was not sure whether it was in Lord Buddha’s time.

He repeated these incidents a few times when we were looking after him, and each time the details were the same. There wasn’t any variance which may have resulted from decaying memory.

http://ven-nyanavimala.buddhasasana.net ... rience.htm

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:00 pm
by Sam Vara
pitakele wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:25 am
Ven. Ñāṇavimala, an accomplished practitioner, related these recollections of past lives
One day Bhante said that in the past, not only did he perform wholesome activities, but unwholesome ones as well. He was having migraine headaches even after becoming a monk, and wanted to know the cause. He told me that after a deep meditation, he realized what had happened in the past to make him suffer so much from migraine: during the time of the Crusades, he was a German soldier and there was a battle with the Romans in a German village. One Roman soldier, short in height, approached him and he gave a blow to his head with the club which killed him.
http://ven-nyanavimala.buddhasasana.net ... rience.htm
Germans certainly embarked on the Crusades, but they would not have fought with "Roman soldiers", especially in Germany itself. There was no fighting in what is Germany. There were no "Romans" then, and any soldiers hailing from the city of Rome would have been part of the same Holy Roman Empire as those who thought of themselves as "Germans".

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:33 pm
by AgarikaJ
Sam Vara wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:00 pm
pitakele wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:25 am
Ven. Ñāṇavimala, an accomplished practitioner, related these recollections of past lives
Germans certainly embarked on the Crusades, but they would not have fought with "Roman soldiers", especially in Germany itself. There was no fighting in what is Germany. There were no "Romans" then, and any soldiers hailing from the city of Rome would have been part of the same Holy Roman Empire as those who thought of themselves as "Germans".
Maybe something got lost in translation, eg a simple confusion between Crusades and Völkerwanderung.

Of course, the Germanic barbarians certainly had warriors, calling themselves soldiers in the sense that they had advanced battlefield strategy and a strict order hierarchy: maybe not.

Anyway, as the account is basically devoid of meaningful facts that would allow to pin down things more concretely...

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:42 pm
by pitakele
Sam Vara wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:00 pm
Germans certainly embarked on the Crusades, but they would not have fought with "Roman soldiers", especially in Germany itself. There was no fighting in what is Germany. There were no "Romans" then, and any soldiers hailing from the city of Rome would have been part of the same Holy Roman Empire as those who thought of themselves as "Germans".
Unfortunately, Ven. Ñāṇavimala is no longer with us to clarify this, and perhaps the Sri Lanka author mixed up the details - who knows? l have no knowledge of European history, but found the following via Google
"Germania" (/dʒərˈmeɪniə/; Latin: [ɡɛrˈmaː.ni.a]) was the Roman term for the geographical region in north-central Europe.

Germania was inhabited mostly by Germanic tribes .... The ancient Greeks were the first to mention the tribes in the area. Later, Julius Caesar wrote about warlike Germanic tribesmen and their threat to Roman Gaul, and there were military clashes between the Romans and the indigenous tribes.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germania

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 3:02 pm
by Sam Vara
Certainly, the history has gone awry somewhere here.

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 4:11 am
by Pondera
I’ve read a translation which says, “with his heart in rapture he reaches up to such rapture of heart that he recollects one, two ...” etc.

Most don’t realize that we’re all falling through our own conduit of time. If you have clairvoyance or simply a good imagination you can look up and you’ll see this conduit winding all the way from the top of your head upwards to the day of your birth.

So how does one travel through said conduit. One must reach up. That’s mainly why most people don’t do it. They don’t know the metaphysics and it’s esoteric - the technique is not explained in the suttas (or anywhere for that matter).

But the idea that the continuum of time is preserved is an old one. Take a look at the Akashic records on Wikipedia. There’s also a scientist out there. You can google “Big ToE” - and he goes into how reality is a binary hologram - with the Akashic records as well. He delves into them.

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 4:51 am
by Pondera
https://www.my-big-toe.com

He’s making a profit of the theory of course.

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 4:28 pm
by Dhammanando
Sam Vara wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 1:00 pm
Germans certainly embarked on the Crusades, but they would not have fought with "Roman soldiers", especially in Germany itself. There was no fighting in what is Germany. There were no "Romans" then, and any soldiers hailing from the city of Rome would have been part of the same Holy Roman Empire as those who thought of themselves as "Germans".
But if we take ‘crusade’ in its extended sense (much commoner in German than in English)...
Any war instigated and blessed by the Church for alleged religious ends, a ‘holy war’; applied esp. to expeditions undertaken under papal sanction against infidels or heretics.” (OED)
... and take ‘Romans’ to mean Roman Catholics, then we’ll have no end of conflicts in which Germans were killed in one or another of the Germanic states by Catholic forces responding to Papal Bulls authorising a crusade. For example, Ñāṇavimala might have been one of the victims of Eugenius III’s crusade against the Wends, Innocent III’s against the Hohenstaufens, Gregory IX’s against the Stedingers ... etc., etc.
The Stedingers refused to pay tithes and to perform forced labour as serfs. These duties were demanded of them with considerable severity, and Archbishop Gerhard II of Bremen (1219-58) sent troops against them. His army, however, was defeated in 1229, whereupon the Stedingers destroyed churches and monasteries, and ill-treated and killed priests. A synod accused them of contempt for the authority of the Church and for the sacraments, as well as of superstitious practices; it also excommunicated them.

The Emperor Frederick II placed the rebels under the ban of the empire, and on 9 October 1232, Gregory IX issued a Bull commanding the Bishops of Lübeck, Minden, and Ratzeburg to preach a crusade against them. An army was collected and advanced against the Stedingers, but it was defeated in the winter of 1232-33. A new crusading army defeated a part of the tribe, but the other part was once more victorious. The pope now issued another Bull, addressed to several bishops of Northern Germany, commanding a fresh crusade, and on 27 May, 1234, the Stedingers were completely defeated near Bremen.

(Michael Paulkovich, No Meek Messiah - Christianity’s Lies, Laws and Legacy p. 85)

Re: Why don't people remember their past lives according to the suttas?

Posted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:33 pm
by Sam Vara
I'll believe anything that isn't Richard Löwenherz squaring up to Ben Hur...