practice

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Jean-François
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2015 6:10 pm

practice

Post by Jean-François »

Hello!
What is a possible practice in everyday life in our modern world?

befriend
Posts: 1595
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:39 am

Re: practice

Post by befriend »

I started meditating every hour on the hour for one minute. Bhante Gunaratana (spelling) talks about this. Its very helpful, it gives me something to look forward to through out the day, also I say when im doing the dishes or brushing my teeth, "now I am brushing my teeth" sometimes I repeat the phrase and It gives me awareness of the experience. also having clear comprehension saying what is the purpose of this action before you do it dharmaseed.org has talks on clear comprehension, it will purify your virtue, and that virtue will increase your present moment awareness. or you can do the zen approach of washing the dishes, where you don't wash the dish to get it done fast so you can move on to the next activity but wash the dish. watch how you normally clean a dish there is much aggressiveness and aversion, that's because you want to get it over with to do something else, but don't do that, when you move the sponge around get the food off that should be your reason to do the dishes not to move on to the next task. its most important to have our focus on good conduct through out the day. set an intention in the beginning of the day, sometimes I say I will be able, or today I am saying be a gift.
Take care of mindfulness and mindfulness will take care of you.

paul
Posts: 1512
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 11:27 pm
Location: Cambodia

Re: practice

Post by paul »

The main Buddhist practice is called "vipassana' (insight into impermanence) and is intended to be practised in daily life and is described in " Mindfulness in Plain English" a book by Bhante Gunaratana, which contains an explanation of the main aspects of meditation in terms of the modern lifestyle:

"The vipassana method comes directly from the Satipatthana Sutta, a discourse
attributed to the Buddha himself. Vipassana is a direct and gradual
cultivation of mindfulness or awareness. It proceeds piece by piece
over a period of years. One’s attention is carefully directed to an
intense examination of certain aspects of one’s own existence. The
meditator is trained to notice more and more of the flow of life experience.
Vipassana is a gentle technique, but it also is very, very thorough.
It is an ancient and codified system of training your mind, a set
of exercises dedicated to the purpose of becoming more and more
aware of your own life experience. It is attentive listening, mindful
seeing, and careful testing. We learn to smell acutely, to touch fully,
and really pay attention to the changes taking place in all these experiences.
We learn to listen to our own thoughts without being caught up in them."

Bhante Gunaratana is a Sri Lankan monk who lives in a monastery in the US.

http://www.urbandharma.org/pdf2/Mindful ... review.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Last edited by paul on Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

culaavuso
Posts: 1363
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2014 8:27 pm

Re: practice

Post by culaavuso »

Jean-François wrote: What is a possible practice in everyday life in our modern world?
AN 7.6: Vitthatadhana Sutta wrote: "And what is the treasure of virtue? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking life, abstains from stealing, abstains from illicit sexual conduct, abstains from lying, abstains from taking intoxicants that cause heedlessness. This, monks, is called the treasure of virtue.
...
"And what is the treasure of listening? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones has heard much, has retained what he/she has heard, has stored what he/she has heard. Whatever teachings are admirable in the beginning, admirable in the middle, admirable in the end, that — in their meaning and expression — proclaim the holy life that is entirely complete and pure: those he/she has listened to often, retained, discussed, accumulated, examined with his/her mind, and well-penetrated in terms of his/her views. This is called the treasure of listening.

"And what is the treasure of generosity? There is the case of a disciple of the noble ones, his awareness cleansed of the stain of stinginess, living at home, freely generous, openhanded, delighting in being magnanimous, responsive to requests, delighting in the distribution of alms. This is called the treasure of generosity.
MN 119: Kāyagatāsati Sutta wrote: Furthermore, when walking, the monk discerns, 'I am walking.' When standing, he discerns, 'I am standing.' When sitting, he discerns, 'I am sitting.' When lying down, he discerns, 'I am lying down.' Or however his body is disposed, that is how he discerns it.
...
Furthermore, when going forward & returning, he makes himself fully alert; when looking toward & looking away... when bending & extending his limbs... when carrying his outer cloak, his upper robe & his bowl... when eating, drinking, chewing, & savoring... when urinating & defecating... when walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep, waking up, talking, & remaining silent, he makes himself fully alert.
AN 4.37: Aparihāniya Sutta wrote: He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.
...
"And how does a monk guard the doors to his sense faculties? There is the case where a monk, on seeing a form with the eye, does not grasp at any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the eye — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the eye. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

"On hearing a sound with the ear...

"On smelling an aroma with the nose...

"On tasting a flavor with the tongue...

"On feeling a tactile sensation with the body...

"On cognizing an idea with the intellect, he does not grasp at any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the intellect — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the intellect. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the intellect. This is how a monk guards the doors to his sense faculties.

"And how does a monk know moderation in eating? There is the case where a monk, considering it appropriately, takes his food not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification, but simply for the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life, thinking, 'I will destroy old feelings [of hunger] & not create new feelings [from overeating]. Thus I will maintain myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.' This is how a monk knows moderation in eating.

ivanlen
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2015 10:37 am

Re: practice

Post by ivanlen »

befriend wrote:I started meditating every hour on the hour for one minute. Bhante Gunaratana (spelling) talks about this. Its very helpful, it gives me something to look forward to through out the day, also I say when im doing the dishes or brushing my teeth, "now I am brushing my teeth" sometimes I repeat the phrase and It gives me awareness of the experience. also having clear comprehension saying what is the purpose of this action before you do it dharmaseed.org has talks on clear comprehension, it will purify your virtue, and that virtue will increase your present moment awareness. or you can do the zen approach of washing the dishes, where you don't wash the dish to get it done fast so you can move on to the next activity but wash the dish. watch how you normally clean a dish there is much aggressiveness and aversion, that's because you want to get it over with to do something else, but don't do that, when you move the sponge around get the food off that should be your reason to do the dishes not to move on to the next task. its most important to have our focus on good conduct through out the day. set an intention in the beginning of the day, sometimes I say I will be able, or today I am saying be a gift.
Thank you for sharing that Befriend

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