The causes for wisdom

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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robertk
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Re: The causes for wisdom

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Specific points about satipatthana and Sujin Boriharnwanaket moved here.
viewtopic.php?f=44&t=32721&p=485800#p485800

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robertk
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Re: The causes for wisdom

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I looked over a website retro linked to today and thought this section, although I don't agree with all of it, was pertinent to this thread:
http://www.hillsidehermitage.org/intent ... s-actions/ by Ajahn Nyanamoli Thero
Right meditation is inseparable from the Right view. That means that even if a person doesn’t have the Right view, their meditation should be concerned about getting it. To put it simply – it comes down to developing the self-transparency (or self-honesty) concerning skilful as skilful (kusala) and unskilful as unskilful (akusala). The Buddha defined the Right view in those very terms – knowing “good as good”, and “bad as bad”. The person with the Right view knows for oneself, beyond any doubt, kusala as kusala and akusala as akusala. By seeing it – he recognizes it. He doesn’t need to hold or adopt any other external criteria. The clarity of his vision pertains to here and now, internally. Thus, for someone who hasn’t achieved that yet, that’s where the meditation should start. Obtaining of the Right criteria and then meditating through it. Keeping it “composed” is the definition of the Right samadhi.

The problem is that this kind of instruction is very non-specific. People today usually need something more proliferated and palpable. They require meditation “methods”. An average man today wants a “recipe”, a prescription of “steps”. He needs to know what exactly he should do, that would then automatically result in his liberation. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work like that. If we look at the Suttas, whenever the Buddha was talking about meditation it was to bring the fulfilment of knowledge and wisdom. Yet, if a person has none of the latter to begin with, then the fulfilment cannot arise nor be fabricated mechanically. Very often the Buddha’s reply on how to meditate would be in instructing people in recognizing and avoiding the unskilful, and cultivating (bhavana) of the skilful. Discerning the nature of kusala and akusala has the potential of taking the mind above both. Freeing it from action (kamma) and it’s results (vipaka), since they are bound to the domain of skilful and unskilful. And that’s exactly why performing (doing or acting) of the specific steps, cannot take one beyond the nature of kamma. Understanding it however, might.

Furthermore, methods and techniques usually don’t amount to more than management of the problem of suffering. Management of something cannot actually uproot that very thing. So, instead of that, a person will be better of in trying to discern what kind of attitude towards meditation can be sustained throughout the day. An attitude that wouldn’t need any particular favorable environment or special conditions to be applied in. Regardless of whether one is sitting in a full lotus posture, or just walking down the street........

auto
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Re: The causes for wisdom

Post by auto »

robertk wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 4:25 am
I looked over a website retro linked to today and thought this section, although I don't agree with all of it, was pertinent to this thread:
http://www.hillsidehermitage.org/intent ... s-actions/ by Ajahn Nyanamoli Thero
Right meditation is inseparable from the Right view. That means that even if a person doesn’t have the Right view, their meditation should be concerned about getting it. To put it simply – it comes down to developing the self-transparency (or self-honesty) concerning skilful as skilful (kusala) and unskilful as unskilful (akusala). The Buddha defined the Right view in those very terms – knowing “good as good”, and “bad as bad”. The person with the Right view knows for oneself, beyond any doubt, kusala as kusala and akusala as akusala. By seeing it – he recognizes it. He doesn’t need to hold or adopt any other external criteria. The clarity of his vision pertains to here and now, internally. Thus, for someone who hasn’t achieved that yet, that’s where the meditation should start. Obtaining of the Right criteria and then meditating through it. Keeping it “composed” is the definition of the Right samadhi.
knowing "good as good". Imo it refers to good as mundane and the other good as dhamma. Earth as earth mean you have dhamma knowledge over earth, mundane knowledge has pathways through body included as you are chained to use body to gain knowledge.
Hence what is seen there is no self in between or no self in the seen, it refer to the self what is not only a mere notion or convention of self it means more..one is chained to clinging to khandhas to fulfill conditions for knowledge to arise. It is arhant who can do nothing regards to the things arisen and gain knowledge because of already seen passing away of that particular thing.
Mindfulness really is 3rd jhana thing which means vacisakharas have been ceased and one can grasp the sampajanna which is knowing about what is going on and no need to get involved.

"By seeing it – he recognizes it" that is related to 'seeing at night', as eyes originally are blind the function of seeing is activated by the light what is coming from the heart.

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