A few ethics questions re: killing

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santa100
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by santa100 » Sun Aug 12, 2012 3:38 pm

The Buddha made it very clear about killing in DN 29 ( http://tipitaka.wikia.com/wiki/Pasadika_Sutta" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ):
"The brother who is arahant, in whom the intoxicants are destroyed, who has lived the life, who has done his task, who has laid low his burden, who has attained salvation, who has utterly destroyed the fetter of rebirth, who is emancipated by the true gnosis, he is incapable of perpetrating nine things :

1. He is incapable of deliberately depriving a living creature of life.

2. He is incapable of taking what is not given so that it constitutes theft.

3. He is incapable of sexual impurity.

4. He is incapable of deliberately telling lies.

5. He is incapable of laying up treasure for indulgence in worldly pleasure as he used to do in the life of the house.

6. He is incapable of taking a wrong course through partiality.

7. He is incapable of taking a wrong course through hate.

8. He is incapable of taking a wrong course through stupidity.

9. He is incapable of taking a wrong course through fear."

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DNS
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by DNS » Sun Aug 12, 2012 6:09 pm

DarwidHalim wrote:This is because you have the concept of death as something real death.
Fortunately, the Buddha did not teach in dualistic, non-dualistic, poetic nonsense. He spoke plainly and bluntly.
"All beings tremble before danger, all fear death. When a man considers this, he does not kill or cause to kill. All beings fear before danger, life is dear to all. When a man considers this, he does not kill or cause to kill." Dhammapada, 129-130
"Monks, one possessed of three qualities is put into Purgatory according to his actions. What three? One is himself a taker of life, encourages another to do the same and approves thereof. Monks, one possessed of three qualities is put into heaven according to his actions. What three? He himself abstains from taking life, encourages another to so abstain, and approves of such abstention."
Anguttara Nikaya, 3.16

D1W1
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by D1W1 » Sat Aug 01, 2015 4:50 am

Sorry to wake this thread. But I just want to ask if anyone finds it difficult to get a reply from Bhante Seelananda? I sent him question many months ago but received nothing.
moyshekapoyre wrote:Namaste,

I asked Bhante Seelananda about the bug question and he simply said, "Please abstain from killing insects!" He doesn't like to expound much--I suppose he doesn't have a lot of computer time.

Thanks folks...

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Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by Bhikkhu Pesala » Sat Aug 01, 2015 7:08 am

D1W1 wrote:Sorry to wake this thread. But I just want to ask if anyone finds it difficult to get a reply from Bhante Seelananda? I sent him question many months ago but received nothing.
Some threads should be allowed to die — others should be killed.

I cannot speak for the Venerable Seelananda, but I don't usually like responding to question via email. Here's the reasons why:
  1. Email correspondence is time-consuming, but it's difficult to just ignore it because the questioner may be discouraged if he/she receives no reply. I usually reply very briefly, and tell the questioner to visit a Buddhist forum like this one or to read some links.
  2. If I make a detailed reply, it will probably only benefit the one person who sent the email. However, if I make a detailed reply on a forum it will be read by many and will still be available years from now.
  3. If something I say is incorrect, or a bit ambivalent, someone more knowledgeable may point out my error for the benefit of all.
  4. If I reply once, some people think that they can then email me at any time. Some who are not computer savvy just add me to their mailing list and forward me all kinds of junk.
So, unless someone is specifically interested in attending my meditation classes or retreats, or wants to visit me to offer alms, etc., I prefer that they post questions here. The same goes for Private Messages here. Unless the topic really is a private matter that you don't want to discuss in public, post on the forum. If you quote something that I wrote, I will probably notice it, and will reply if I have something worthwhile to add. If I ignore your reply, it's probably because I don't wish to get involved in contentious debates that are unlikely to be beneficial to anyone.
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Ron-The-Elder
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by Ron-The-Elder » Sat Aug 22, 2015 3:56 am

I think that successful communications with Bhikkhus, Bhikkunis, and other venerables is a very individualistic issue. Some are quite hospitable and gracious with their responses. Others are not and place restrictions on their communications as we have just read in the previous post.

My suggestion would be to communicate with several and see, which Bhikkhus are able to support your specific needs.

Buddha asked all of his original followers to share The Dhamma with any who would listen, but teaching The Dhamma was usually in exchange for shared meals received during alms rounds. At other times they may have been invited into the homes of laypersons such as community elders, or often royalty, which wanted to learn from monks, who were noted for being highly effective at teaching The Dhamma. In the suttas Buddha and his closest followers were frequently asked to teach in this manner. For ordinary, less notable monks teaching during alms rounds was for the most part their only means of daily sustenance.

If modern day monastics are following the course of instruction outlined for them in The Vinaya Pitaka, then they can be expected to behave in a similar manner. Theravadan monks seem to hold to this discipline, at least those with whom I have come in contact over the last seventeen years or so.

source for further study : http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/vin/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; :reading:
Last edited by Ron-The-Elder on Sat Aug 22, 2015 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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A head of gray hairs doesn't mean one's an elder. Advanced in years, one's called an old fool.
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-Dhammpada, 19, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.

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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by Dinsdale » Sat Aug 22, 2015 12:35 pm

David N. Snyder wrote:Fortunately, the Buddha did not teach in dualistic, non-dualistic, poetic nonsense. He spoke plainly and bluntly.
"All beings tremble before danger, all fear death. When a man considers this, he does not kill or cause to kill. All beings fear before danger, life is dear to all. When a man considers this, he does not kill or cause to kill." Dhammapada, 129-130
:goodpost:
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Vanda
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Re: A few ethics questions re: killing

Post by Vanda » Sun Aug 23, 2015 4:51 pm

Right now we have fleas in the living room, and my mom is intent on killing them... Personally I would rather just let them bite me... I feel a bit out of touch with reality...
:thinking:
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“Don’t go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, ‘This contemplative is our teacher.’ When you know for yourselves that, ‘These qualities are skillful; these qualities are blameless; these qualities are praised by the wise; these qualities, when adopted and carried out, lead to welfare and to happiness’ — then you should enter and remain in them.”
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