sacrifice

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befriend
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sacrifice

Post by befriend » Thu Mar 15, 2012 8:03 pm

if im not mistaken the teaching in buddhism is that it is better to be killed than to kill. your virtue is more important than your life. is this the correct teaching?
would you agree with the phrase if you have nothing to die for you have nothing to live for? meaning your compassion is weak and life is superficial if you do not have the compassion to die for another. i have some other questions that apply to this topic, buddha fed himself to a tigress in one of his past lives to save her from starvation. is it considered wholesome to run into a burning building to save a cat risking your life? i am asking because i do not know the teaching on this. i thought this would warrant a nice discussion on sila, and how far we take it in the buddhist practice.
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ground
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Re: sacrifice

Post by ground » Thu Mar 15, 2012 8:13 pm

befriend wrote:your virtue is more important than your life. is this the correct teaching?
The teaching does not affirm "mine".
befriend wrote: would you agree with the phrase if you have nothing to die for you have nothing to live for?
Frankly, this seems to be an expression of ordinary obsession with "life and death" and the ordinary obsession with "meaning of life and death".


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Fede
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Re: sacrifice

Post by Fede » Fri Mar 16, 2012 8:05 am

Well, I'm looking at the first Precept here, and wondering how your question fits in with that....
I don't think the dying of the Buddha in a previous life, to feed himself to a tigress is a question of self-sacrifice.
It hinges more on compassion....the feeling of compassion over-rode any sense of self-sacrifice.

i am advised that the 5 silas also include - maybe above all - yourself...
"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

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Goofaholix
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Re: sacrifice

Post by Goofaholix » Fri Mar 16, 2012 8:44 am

befriend wrote:if im not mistaken the teaching in buddhism is that it is better to be killed than to kill. your virtue is more important than your life. is this the correct teaching?
would you agree with the phrase if you have nothing to die for you have nothing to live for? meaning your compassion is weak and life is superficial if you do not have the compassion to die for another. i have some other questions that apply to this topic, buddha fed himself to a tigress in one of his past lives to save her from starvation. is it considered wholesome to run into a burning building to save a cat risking your life? i am asking because i do not know the teaching on this. i thought this would warrant a nice discussion on sila, and how far we take it in the buddhist practice.
Seems like you've got romantic ideals going on there, the tigress incident is part of the mythology of the Buddhas past and not an example for us to follow.

The Buddha taught that intention (motivation) of your action is what is important. I think it should be obvious to most people that instead of killing or being killed finding a peaceful solution is better.

Of course if you kill someone you'll never be the same again, there will be kammic consequences, surely though the kammic consequences of you letting someone go on to kill again when you had the chance to stop him is worse.

I wouldn't agree with the phrase if you have nothing to die for you have nothing to live for, life just is, so just live it without the need to attach to romantic notions about life and death creating a source of piety.
“Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it.” ― Ajahn Chah

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