Before the law - Franz Kafka

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Bundokji
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Before the law - Franz Kafka

Post by Bundokji » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:37 am

Before the law sits a gatekeeper. To this gatekeeper comes a man from the country who asks to gain entry into the law. But the gatekeeper says that he cannot grant him entry at the moment. The man thinks about it and then asks if he will be allowed to come in later on. “It is possible,” says the gatekeeper, “but not now.” At the moment the gate to the law stands open, as always, and the gatekeeper walks to the side, so the man bends over in order to see through the gate into the inside. When the gatekeeper notices that, he laughs and says: “If it tempts you so much, try it in spite of my prohibition. But take note: I am powerful. And I am only the most lowly gatekeeper. But from room to room stand gatekeepers, each more powerful than the other. I can’t endure even one glimpse of the third.” The man from the country has not expected such difficulties: the law should always be accessible for everyone, he thinks, but as he now looks more closely at the gatekeeper in his fur coat, at his large pointed nose and his long, thin, black Tartar’s beard, he decides that it would be better to wait until he gets permission to go inside. The gatekeeper gives him a stool and allows him to sit down at the side in front of the gate. There he sits for days and years. He makes many attempts to be let in, and he wears the gatekeeper out with his requests. The gatekeeper often interrogates him briefly, questioning him about his homeland and many other things, but they are indifferent questions, the kind great men put, and at the end he always tells him once more that he cannot let him inside yet. The man, who has equipped himself with many things for his journey, spends everything, no matter how valuable, to win over the gatekeeper. The latter takes it all but, as he does so, says, “I am taking this only so that you do not think you have failed to do anything.” During the many years the man observes the gatekeeper almost continuously. He forgets the other gatekeepers, and this one seems to him the only obstacle for entry into the law. He curses the unlucky circumstance, in the first years thoughtlessly and out loud, later, as he grows old, he still mumbles to himself. He becomes childish and, since in the long years studying the gatekeeper he has come to know the fleas in his fur collar, he even asks the fleas to help him persuade the gatekeeper. Finally his eyesight grows weak, and he does not know whether things are really darker around him or whether his eyes are merely deceiving him. But he recognizes now in the darkness an illumination which breaks inextinguishably out of the gateway to the law. Now he no longer has much time to live. Before his death he gathers in his head all his experiences of the entire time up into one question which he has not yet put to the gatekeeper. He waves to him, since he can no longer lift up his stiffening body. The gatekeeper has to bend way down to him, for the great difference has changed things to the disadvantage of the man. “What do you still want to know, then?” asks the gatekeeper. “You are insatiable.” “Everyone strives after the law,” says the man, “so how is that in these many years no one except me has requested entry?” The gatekeeper sees that the man is already dying and, in order to reach his diminishing sense of hearing, he shouts at him, “Here no one else can gain entry, since this entrance was assigned only to you. I’m going now to close it.
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

binocular
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Re: Before the law - Franz Kafka

Post by binocular » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:21 am

Kafka's texts are bad faith.
Every person we save is one less zombie to fight. -- World War Z

paul
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Re: Before the law - Franz Kafka

Post by paul » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:01 am

“Wisdom [is] a question of grasping the coherence of things and time, of deciphering oneself, and of penetrating one’s own becoming and dying.
[…]
The truth is always an abyss. One must — as in a swimming pool — dare to dive from the quivering springboard of trivial everyday experience and sink into the depths, in order later to rise again — laughing and fighting for breath — to the now doubly illuminated surface of things.”—“Conversations with Kafka”, Janouch.

Here is a description of mindfulness, where everyday experience is put into the frame of remembered dhamma principles including impermanence, and functioning as the raw material.
The OP quote is a description of dukkha, where worldlings attempt to obtain satisfaction directly from samsara, which is inherently unable to give it. The ‘wisdom’ quote originated in the last years of Kafka’s life, indicating he had penetrated conventional reality. This goes to show that the dhamma is a universal law able to be accessed by anyone who works hard at it.

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Bundokji
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Re: Before the law - Franz Kafka

Post by Bundokji » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:30 am

paul wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:01 am
The OP quote is a description of dukkha, where worldlings attempt to obtain satisfaction directly from samsara, which is inherently unable to give it. The ‘wisdom’ quote originated in the last years of Kafka’s life, indicating he had penetrated conventional reality. This goes to show that the dhamma is a universal law able to be accessed by anyone who works hard at it.
This is how i interpreted it as well. Thank you for your input :anjali:
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

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Bundokji
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Re: Before the law - Franz Kafka

Post by Bundokji » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:46 am

The following includes Ven Nanavira's interpretation of Kafka's trial

http://www.nanavira.org/letters/post-so ... ember-1963
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

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