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Inspiring Words

Posted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 7:47 pm
by Will
Uplifting notions, not necessarily from Buddha or his followers:
But what is the purpose of all this? That we may understand—since we have been born into this condition of being what we choose to be—that we ought to be sure above else that it may never be said against us that, born to a high position, we failed to appreciate it, but fell instead to the estate of brutes and uncomprehending beasts of burden; and that the saying of Asaph the Prophet, “You are all Gods and sons of the Most High,” might rather be true; and finally that we may not, through abuse of the generosity of a most indulgent Father, pervert the free option which He has given us from a saving to a damning gift. Let a certain saving ambition invade our souls so that, impatient of mediocrity, we pant after the highest things and (since, if we will, we can) bend all our efforts to their attainment.
Excerpt From: Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Oration on the Dignity of Man.

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:48 pm
by Will
The term taste, like all other figurative terms, is not extremely
accurate; the thing which we understand by it is far from a simple
and determinate idea in the minds of most men, and it is therefore
liable to uncertainty and confusion. I have no great opinion of a
definition, the celebrated remedy for the cure of this disorder. For,
when we define, we seem in danger of circumscribing nature within
the bounds of our own notions, which we often take up by hazard,
or embrace on trust, or form out of a limited and partial consideration
of the object before us; instead of extending our ideas to take
in all that nature comprehends, according to her manner of combining.
We are limited in our inquiry by the strict laws to which
we have submitted at our setting out.
Edmund Burke, "On Taste"

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 7:50 pm
by Kusala
Image

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 9:52 pm
by Aloka
.

When the great lord passes, the wise peasant bows deeply and silently farts.

(Ethiopian Proverb)


:o

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 1:50 am
by chownah
Aloka,
What a great proverb! Can you share with us how this inspires you in your daily life perhaps?
chownah

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:58 am
by Aloka
chownah wrote:Aloka,
What a great proverb! Can you share with us how this inspires you in your daily life perhaps?
chownah
It inspires me to remember that I have a sense of humour, chownah.


:)

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 9:15 pm
by Kusala
Image

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 10:51 pm
by Will
Man would fain be great and sees that he is little; would fain be happy and sees that he is miserable; would fain be perfect and sees that he is full of imperfections; would fain be the object of the love and esteem of men, and sees that his faults merit only their aversion and contempt. The embarrassment wherein he finds himself produces in him the most unjust and criminal passions imaginable, for he conceives a mortal hatred against that truth which blames him and convinces him of his faults.
Blaise Pascal, Pensees

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:04 pm
by Will
The idea of the good is the greatest discipline.
Socrates, The Republic

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:20 pm
by Will
For if we are temperate, we shall still continue to be so, though these calamities may befall us, and if we are contemplators of true beings, neither shall we be plundered of this habit; but all these dreadful events taking place, we shall still persevere in celebrating the rulers of all things, and in investigating the causes of effects.
- Proclus, On Providence, Fate, and that which is in our Power, 22, 20

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 5:57 pm
by Will
If powers fail, there shall be praise for daring; and in great undertaking, to have willed is enough.
Propertius II, 10, 5-6

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 11:02 pm
by Will
It is the characteristic of the impotent (as Seneca writes) to have their knowledge all written down in note-books, as though the discoveries of those who preceded us had closed the path to our own efforts, as though the power of nature had become effete in us and could bring forth nothing which, if it could not demonstrate the truth, might at least point to it from afar. The farmer hates sterility in his field and even more then must the divine mind hate the sterile mind with which it is joined and associated, because it hopes from that source to have offspring of such a higher nature.
Excerpt From: Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Oration on the Dignity of Man., Caponigri trans.

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:28 am
by Kusala
Image

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:12 am
by robertk
"Once the game is over, the king and the pawn go back in the same box."
- Italian Proverb

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:29 am
by Mkoll
Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj wrote:Whatever you come across -- go beyond.

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:08 pm
by akashdhamma
Samsara is a constantly raging s### storm. Get out as fast as you can 1!!1!

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 2:57 pm
by Will
Such is the nature of true social justice, [Orestes] Brownson declares: not the selfish loneliness of the Benthamite philosophy, nor the mean equality of the Socialists, but a liberation of every man, under God, to do the best that is in him. Poverty is no evil, in itself; obscurity is no evil; labor is no evil; even physical pain may be no evil, as it was no evil to the martyrs. This world is a place of trial and struggle, so that we may find our higher nature in right response to challenge.
To the Socialist, says Brownson, poverty, obscurity, and physical suffering are positive evils, because the Socialist does not perceive that these challenges are put into the world to save us from apathy and sloth and indifference. The Socialist would condemn humanity to a condition of permanent injustice, in which no man could hope for what is his due, the right to exercise his talents given him by God; the Socialist would keep us all in perpetual childhood.

Excerpt From: The Essential Russell Kirk.

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Sun Aug 07, 2016 2:02 am
by Will
All the aspects of any civilization arise out of a people’s religion: its politics, its economics, its arts, its sciences, even its simple crafts are the by-products of religious insights and a religious cult. For until human beings are tied together by some common faith, and share certain moral principles, they prey upon one another. In the common worship of the cult, a community forms. At the heart of every culture is a body of ethics, of distinctions between good and evil; and in the beginning, at least, those distinctions are founded upon the authority of revealed religion. Not until a people have come to share religious belief are they able to work together satisfactorily, or even to make sense of the world in which they find themselves. Thus all order—even the ideological order of modern totalist states, professing atheism—could not have come into existence, had it not grown out of general belief in truths that are perceived by the moral imagination.
Excerpt From: The Essential Russell Kirk, p. 52.

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Sun Aug 07, 2016 8:26 am
by Mkoll
He who binds to himself a joy
Does the wingéd life destroy.
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity's sunrise.


William Blake

Re: Inspiring Words

Posted: Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:46 pm
by Will
The myth of inevitable and perpetual progress has been exploded by the impact of world wars, with their demonstration that autonomous man cannot solve the vast problems of racial and cultural conflict, economic welfare and political order...He is overwhelmed by his own machinery, and by social torrents set loose through his unwillingness to affirm his solidarity with his fellow men. The judgments of God are manifest in the world of today. The time has come to bring home to men that these are right judgments on human sin; that men bear these consequences inevitably, because they are morally responsible beings who have denied their own nature in denying their responsibility to their neighbors.
R. B. Y. Scott, The Relevance of the Prophets: An Introduction to the Old Testament Prophets and their Message (New York, 1968), 225.