Paris

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
User avatar
dhammacoustic
Posts: 858
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 4:30 am
Location: Dhammaville

Paris

Post by dhammacoustic » Sat Nov 14, 2015 12:16 am

:candle:

Parisians on Twitter have launched the hashtag #PorteOuverte, which translates to #OpenDoor, to offer shelter and safety to those stranded.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015 ... /75736386/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Uppādā vā tathagātanaṃ anuppādā vā tathagātanaṃ, ṭhitāva sā dhātu dhammaṭṭhitatā dhammaniyāmatā idappaccayatā. Taṃ tathagāto abhisam­buj­jhati abhisameti. Abhisam­bujjhitvā abhisametvā ācikkhati deseti paññāpeti paṭṭhapeti vivarati vibhajati uttānīkaroti. ‘Passathā’ti cāha; ‘avijjāpaccayā, bhikkhave, saṅkhārā’. Iti kho, bhikkhave, yā tatra tathatā avitathatā anaññathatā idappaccayatā-ayaṃ vuccati, bhikkhave, paṭiccasamup­pādo.
:heart: namō tassa bhagavatō, arahatō, sammā sambuddhassā

User avatar
samseva
Posts: 2131
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:59 pm

Re: Paris

Post by samseva » Sat Nov 14, 2015 2:49 am

For anyone interested in following the events:
http://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-europe-34815972

Apparently, all attackers are believed to be dead.

:candle:

User avatar
Kusala
Posts: 754
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:02 am

Re: Paris

Post by Kusala » Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:11 am

Our thoughts and prayers are with you, France... :candle:
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

User avatar
Ben
Posts: 18442
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: kanamaluka

Re: Paris

Post by Ben » Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:07 am

:candle:
may all beings be happy.
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com..

Dinsdale
Posts: 5986
Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:32 am
Location: Andromeda looks nice

Re: Paris

Post by Dinsdale » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:57 am

:candle:

Vive la liberté
Buddha save me from new-agers!

User avatar
Anagarika
Posts: 915
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:25 pm

Re: Paris

Post by Anagarika » Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:00 pm

It will be interesting to see the reactions from Buddhists as to these developments in France, and in general to the activities of ISIS around the world. I think of a talk that Ajahn Brahmali gave, when he described people that cause us anguish and engender feelings of aversion. His focus was to see them as aggregates of causes and conditions; a way, perhaps to avoid the "he hurt me" reaction, and to see others, even in their worst states, as accumulations of causes and akusala behavior.

This view is not a call for passivity among Buddhists, but for clear seeing, it seems to me. I could not be dispassionate over the news that the "Jihadi John," the UK citizen who was responsible for cutting the heads off of innocents, may have been blown up in a drone attack yesterday. His presence on this planet, if the news is true, will not be missed. But, what further violence from ISIS will this death engender?

As Buddhists, even if we acknowledge in some quiet way the death of Jihadi John and those like him, we have to be mindful that for the peace of the planet, we need to be aware of the causes and conditions that create an ISIS, and to not join the reactive call for unmitigated violence around the world. Countries need to protect their citizens, that is clear. The US, French, and Russian armies will not stand down. It will be interesting to see if Buddhists can formulate a rational, pragmatic and Dhammic response to the crisis that is ISIS; the crisis that is western military involvement in Middle east state affairs. Perhaps had countries like my own ( the US) avoided involvement in Syria and other Middle east regions (one set of causes and conditions) , and had not acted so recklessly, stupidly, and greedily in our interactions in this region of the world, we would not have seen an ISIS develop.

The answer to Paris, it seems to me, is to analyze the causes and conditions that allow for the development of radical Islam and terrorism, and to use this knowledge of these causes to rationally develop a plan to lessen the conflict and violence in the world for the next decades. Otherwise, the planet will see more death, more hatred, more radicalism. Perhaps there is a role for Buddhists (and all wise, rational people) to mediate and mitigate what is bound to be a planet with more "black and white; them vs. us" thinking, and more conflict.
Last edited by Anagarika on Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Kamran
Posts: 458
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:14 am

Re: Paris

Post by Kamran » Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:13 pm

Rise of Isis: documentary on how the west's war mongering unleashed these barbaric thugs on the world.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/rise-of-isis/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

France and western countries continue to sell billions of weapons to Saudi Arabia, which supplies these terrorists.

May we learn to control our Greed, which is causing all this suffering.
"Silence gives answers"

Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi

User avatar
lyndon taylor
Posts: 1835
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 11:41 pm
Location: Redlands, US occupied Northern Mexico
Contact:

Re: Paris

Post by lyndon taylor » Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:45 pm

France declared war on ISIS some time ago and commenced bombing the hell out of their "califate". Now, thousands of dead ISIS fighters later, and however many innocent civilians, ISIS fights back and kills 127 French citizens. War is hell, but don't get the idea that all the atrocities are coming from only one side. I'm as against ISIS' tactics as the next guy, but as a Buddhist I can only hope there is a less violent way to settle the conflict than the road we are presently on.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Bundokji
Posts: 1742
Joined: Mon Nov 24, 2014 11:57 pm

Re: Paris

Post by Bundokji » Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:33 pm

These attacks will cause a lot of suffering not only to the families of the dead and injured, but also to the many Syrian refugees in Europe who might feel less welcome because of what happened.

From my limited understanding of Buddhism, one cannot ordain if he has unpaid debts. In other words, you cannot renounce the world while leaving a mess behind which makes sense. It is understandable that some western countries decided that they made a mistake by occupying Iraq and not to resort to any large-scale interfering. However, they left a lot of garbage behind which infested the whole region and the west itself started to experience some of the consequences.

I think the west has a moral obligation to take more serious actions. Unfortunately, actions are only taken when they taste some of the suffering the people of the region have been experiencing on a daily basis.

I found the following photo posted on Rumi's Facebook page which I would like to share with you
Rumi.jpg
Rumi.jpg (106.34 KiB) Viewed 1235 times
And the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus, saying: "Behold now, bhikkhus, I exhort you: All compounded things are subject to vanish. Strive with earnestness!"

This was the last word of the Tathagata.

User avatar
lyndon taylor
Posts: 1835
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 11:41 pm
Location: Redlands, US occupied Northern Mexico
Contact:

Re: Paris

Post by lyndon taylor » Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:48 pm

I got the same post on my facebook page, bunjoki, I shared it and also posted it on a religions forum I participate in, excellent post, I mean really 95% of these people mourning Paris don't give a damn about the almost equal amount of death and carnage when ISIS bombed Beirut last week. Many Americans don't give a damn about how many people die in Muslim countries, 99% of the victims of this war have been Muslims, yet almost all the western tears are for the few victims that are not Muslim and living in the Middle East. Disgusting.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

User avatar
cobwith
Posts: 334
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 7:52 pm
Contact:

Re: Paris

Post by cobwith » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:01 pm

My little niece Mélanie was supposed to go to that concert, but declined the invitation at the last moment. She is a low keyed kind of woman. (karma ?)
"Stay out of the battle" said once Ajahn Chah.

Her friend got wounded; and, this morning, they had no news of another friend attending the show.

Let us always have a mind turned toward peace, and be mindful to protect others.
Sā me dhammamadesesi,
khandhāyatanadhātuyo
Thig 5.8

User avatar
lyndon taylor
Posts: 1835
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 11:41 pm
Location: Redlands, US occupied Northern Mexico
Contact:

Re: Paris

Post by lyndon taylor » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:21 pm

Wow, that's pretty close to home, condolences, hope for the best.
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community, sincerely former monk John

http://trickleupeconomictheory.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Ben
Posts: 18442
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: kanamaluka

Re: Paris

Post by Ben » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:43 pm

An excellent post, Anagarika.
What appears to me as a root cause of this violence is the parasitic Neo-liberal market economics where unchecked consumption is encouraged which is supported by processes that are destroying the natural environment, making large parts of the world uninhabitable, causing ever-increasing flows of humanity to flee oppression, starvation or financial slavery and the stockpiling of resources and wealth for the very few.
Kind regards,
Ben
Anagarika wrote:It will be interesting to see the reactions from Buddhists as to these developments in France, and in general to the activities of ISIS around the world. I think of a talk that Ajahn Brahmali gave, when he described people that cause us anguish and engender feelings of aversion. His focus was to see them as aggregates of causes and conditions; a way, perhaps to avoid the "he hurt me" reaction, and to see others, even in their worst states, as accumulations of causes and akusala behavior.

This view is not a call for passivity among Buddhists, but for clear seeing, it seems to me. I could not be dispassionate over the news that the "Jihadi John," the UK citizen who was responsible for cutting the heads off of innocents, may have been blown up in a drone attack yesterday. His presence on this planet, if the news is true, will not be missed. But, what further violence from ISIS will this death engender?

As Buddhists, even if we acknowledge in some quiet way the death of Jihadi John and those like him, we have to be mindful that for the peace of the planet, we need to be aware of the causes and conditions that create an ISIS, and to not join the reactive call for unmitigated violence around the world. Countries need to protect their citizens, that is clear. The US, French, and Russian armies will not stand down. It will be interesting to see if Buddhists can formulate a rational, pragmatic and Dhammic response to the crisis that is ISIS; the crisis that is western military involvement in Middle east state affairs. Perhaps had countries like my own ( the US) avoided involvement in Syria and other Middle east regions (one set of causes and conditions) , and had not acted so recklessly, stupidly, and greedily in our interactions in this region of the world, we would not have seen an ISIS develop.

The answer to Paris, it seems to me, is to analyze the causes and conditions that allow for the development of radical Islam and terrorism, and to use this knowledge of these causes to rationally develop a plan to lessen the conflict and violence in the world for the next decades. Otherwise, the planet will see more death, more hatred, more radicalism. Perhaps there is a role for Buddhists (and all wise, rational people) to mediate and mitigate what is bound to be a planet with more "black and white; them vs. us" thinking, and more conflict.
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com..

User avatar
Anagarika
Posts: 915
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 11:25 pm

Re: Paris

Post by Anagarika » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:59 pm

Ben, you're so right. Environmental and economic violence are leading, disturbing causes.

Metta to you and your family.

AD

User avatar
Ben
Posts: 18442
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: kanamaluka

Re: Paris

Post by Ben » Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:16 pm

Anagarika wrote:Ben, you're so right. Environmental and economic violence are leading, disturbing causes.

Metta to you and your family.

AD
Thanks, and metta to you and your family, AD.

You might find the below article in New Matilda of interest.
Westerners are finally being given just a small taste of the constant fear that people from other nations have endured for generations. So solidarity with, and compassion for, the French is a good thing.

But solidarity and compassion for the victims of terrorism everywhere is even better, in particular those who’ve fallen victim to the terrorism sponsored in all our names.

https://newmatilda.com/2015/11/14/paris ... d-outrage/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com..

Locked

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 64 guests