Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

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Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Anand-Carlsen part 2

It was only a year ago Carlsen defeated Anand for the World Chess Championship. Now it is time for Carlsen to defend his title already. In previous decades, world champions often got a 2 to 4 year break.

This is not a boxing style rematch. Anand had to earn the right to compete against Carlsen, by competing in a 8 person tournament of the top contenders for the championship. Anand won that Candidates Tournament earlier this year.

Match play starts in just 3 days in Sochi, Russia and goes until November 28, 2014.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Che ... nship_2014
http://www.sochi2014.fide.com/
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Sanjay PS »

In the recent newspapers read about Carlsen mentioning that he was loosing badly in recent times , because his mind was going in self-destruct mode . I couldn't help but think that the case is applicable for most of us . Getting attached to the different kind of sensations that courses within us from time to time . For some, the unpleasantness is for long periods , for some, the pleasantness is for long periods . For the lucky , its a see saw ride of sensations , hopefully bringing along with it , the taste of Dhamma .

Wishing Carlsen finds the rythm back, and Anand gives a good fight .
The Path of Dhamma

The path of Dhamma is no picnic . It is a strenuous march steeply up the hill . If all the comrades desert you , Walk alone ! Walk alone ! with all the Thrill !!

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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Game 1, Anand playing white = Draw
Game 2, Carlsen playing white = Carlsen wins!

Game 2

Commentary by IM Tihomir Yanev

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 This is the common way to keep more pieces on the board and it perfectly suits Carlsen's style.
4... Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. Re1 Not surprisingly, Carlsen chooses a rare move. Usually game goes on like this (6. c3 O-O 7. Nbd2 a6 8. Ba4 which may transpose to well-known lines.)
6... O-O 7. Bxc6 bxc6 White made a responsible decision by giving away the bishop pair. While the center stays the way it is, there will be plenty of time for maneuvering. If the position opens at any moment, it will be black who would have the edge mainly because of the light squares.
8. h3 You will often see this restricting move, which not only prevents enemy pieces from coming to g4 but gives h2-square for a knight.
8... Re8 9. Nbd2 Nd7 There is plenty of time to play a move like this as long as white are unable to start an active play. Have you noticed that both players delayed developing c1 and c8 bishops? Simply because it's not clear where to develop them yet.
10. Nc4 Bb6 11. a4 a5 12. Nxb6 cxb6 Not sure why Carlsen decided to simplify the position and give chance to black to improve their pawn structure. To me it doesn't combine well with his play so far. Instead probably it would have made more sense to just slowly improve position by Qe2, Bd2 and so on.
13. d4 Qc7 The point of this is to be able to open d-file at any point. Take a note that black's queenside formation has made a run and will constantly require protection.
14. Ra3 Nf8 I like the way Carlsen is smoothly combining his ideas. Rook is ready to join the battle via 3rd rank and some day may end up on g3 against the black king. Did anyone thought of this when white played a2-a4 few moves ago?
15. dxe5 If white had any advantage until this point, I believe they don't after this move. 15. d5!? was an interesting try, although black is perfectly fine after cxd5 Rxc3 Qb7 Qxd5
15... dxe5 16. Nh4 Rd8 Anand quickly realised that his main counterplay will be on d-file. He has plenty of defensive resources to white's potential attack like Ra7, f6, Ng6. I believe he'll easily liquidate the danger.
17. Qh5 f6 Good move! Now Qf7 is coming and there's no active square for Qh5. White must create threats immediately.
18. Nf5 Give your opponent choices and he will make a mistake at some point. Taking on f5 will probably be the simplest (not the best) solution, but black will still have some issues around g7 and Nf8 still will be out of play for some time.
18... Be6 19. Rg3 I am surprised that Anand hasn't played for a while now. It was obvious that white must continue by introducing his rook to g-file. Bxf5 makes less sense compared to the previous move, Ng6 runs into nasty tactical possibilities after Bh6 where no human player would feel comfortable, so the question is "Is there anything wrong with Rd7?"
19... Ng6 20. h4 Instead of going crazy with Bh6, Carlsen remains calm and tries to improve slowly because black can't actually do anything on the open file. This is the first time in the game I see Anand some real pressure. So far he defended superbly.
20... Bxf5 I am sure Anand saw Kh8, but he refused to play such an unnatural move. Rd7, followed by Rad8, is slow and useless, so for the last 10 minutes he changed his mind and admitted he has worse position.
21. exf5 Nf4 22. Bxf4 exf4 White has gained a great amount of small "positional pluses". Firstly, 7th rank is a bit exposed, so is the black king. There is a fantastic outpost on e6 and too many targets. You can see how vulnerable the queenside pawn formation is. Eventually black will be forced to defend it by playing something as ugly as c6-c5. Then b6-pawn will be weak till the end of the game.
23. Rc3 c5 24. Re6 Tough spot for Anand. He can either suffer few more hours or decide to sacrifice a pawn (probably the one on f4) at some point to gain some time to regroup. Sooner or later he must deal with 8th rank problems because Re8+ is an annoying threat. That's why engines like h7-h6 here.
24... Rab8 25. Rc4 The rook c3 has done its job - provoking pawn advance and now it's ready to switch to e-file with the deadly threat of rook coming to 7th rank. Black has an open file and some simplification ideas in mind (mainly Qd7-Qd1+) but white has all the time in the world to improve step by step and after Kh2 there's not much black can think of.
25... Qd7 26. Kh2 Rf8 Does black need to be that passive? I hope he won't just sit and wait for the end. Exchanging a pair of rooks to reduce the pressure would make more sense to me.
27. Rce4 Rb7 28. Qe2 b5 Looks like the only decent chance to save the game. Staying solid with 29.b3 may cause even further complications after 29...c4! Carlsen has enough time to do a few calculation and play the active (most likely winning) move Re7. I believe this game can be over by the time control.
29. b3 Instead of going for some deep calculations, Carlsen tries to keep a solid position and eliminate potential counterplay.
29... bxa4 30. bxa4 Rb4 Now after Re7 Qxf5?? can you spot the winning idea? It's all forced: Rxb4, axb4 Qc4+ Kh8 Qf7 Rg8 Re8 and mate will follow.
31. Re7 Qd6 32. Qf3 Rxe4 33. Qxe4 f3+ 34. g3 h5 Probably exhausted after a long defence for the last 15-20 moves and under time pressure Anand gives up suddenly. Should have done better, for instance Qd2 or Qd4.
35. Qb7 Carlsen will be pleased to finish the game off before the time control, a game where he expectedly deviated from the main lines and found interesting attacking possibilities (a4, Ra1-a3-g3). With two pair of pieces already out of the board, I think the Challenger underestimated the attack in the beginning but after a long consideration he decided to simplify and played worse position with plenty of weaknesses without any counterplay. Calrsen avoided complications whenever possible and finished the game once the first opportunity arose.

In the 12 game match, Carlsen now leads 1.5 - 0.5
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Game 3:
Anand wins!! It is the first win by Anand in a World Championship match with Carlsen. He didn't win any games last year and now finally won one this time, in game #3.

Match score: 1.5 - 1.5

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 c6 8. Bd3 b6 9. b4 a5 10. a3 Ba6 11. Bxa6 Rxa6 12. b5 cxb5 13. c6 Qc8 14. c7 b4 15. Nb5 a4 16. Rc1 Ne4 17. Ng5 Ndf6 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 19. f3 Ra5 20. fxe4 Rxb5 21. Qxa4 Ra5 22. Qc6 bxa3 23. exd5 Rxd5 24. Qxb6 Qd7 25. O-O Rc8 26. Rc6 g5 27. Bg3 Bb4 28. Ra1 Ba5 29. Qa6 Bxc7 30. Qc4 e5 31. Bxe5 Rxe5 32. dxe5 Qe7 33. e6 Kf8 34. Rc1 1-0
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Mkoll »

David N. Snyder wrote:Game 3:
Anand wins!! It is the first win by Anand in a World Championship match with Carlsen. He didn't win any games last year and now finally won one this time, in game #3.

Match score: 1.5 - 1.5

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 c6 8. Bd3 b6 9. b4 a5 10. a3 Ba6 11. Bxa6 Rxa6 12. b5 cxb5 13. c6 Qc8 14. c7 b4 15. Nb5 a4 16. Rc1 Ne4 17. Ng5 Ndf6 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 19. f3 Ra5 20. fxe4 Rxb5 21. Qxa4 Ra5 22. Qc6 bxa3 23. exd5 Rxd5 24. Qxb6 Qd7 25. O-O Rc8 26. Rc6 g5 27. Bg3 Bb4 28. Ra1 Ba5 29. Qa6 Bxc7 30. Qc4 e5 31. Bxe5 Rxe5 32. dxe5 Qe7 33. e6 Kf8 34. Rc1 1-0
Carlsen got owned that game.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Dhammanando »

Susan Polgar's live commentary on game 3.

http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2014/11 ... ntary.html


Welcome to Carlsen - Anand Sochi World Championship game 3 (LIVE commentary by me).

Thanks for joining me. What can we expect from Anand today? After just two games, Anand is already behind with a tough loss with black in game two. He also had a shaky first game with white. If he does not turn things around now, it may be too much of an uphill climb to try to regain his title.

I expect a more aggressive Anand today. He realized that he cannot keep up with Carlsen in dry positions. Changes in strategy and changes in attitude are needed. As I said after game two, he must play the position and not Carlsen. Just loosen the collar, take a deep breath, have fun, give his all and qué será será!


Anand - Carlsen (game 3)

1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 Magnus opted for something safer

4 Nc3 Be7 5 Bf4 0-0 Typical position for Queen's Gambit Declined

6 e3 Nbd7 7 c5 c6 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 Nc3 Be7 5 Bf4O-O 6 e3 Nbd7 7 c5 c6 8 Bd3 b6 9 b4 a5 10 a3 Ba6 11 Bxa6 Rxa6 12 b5 The players are cranking out these book moves in lightning speed. Anand is going for a sharp line instead of something more positional.

12...cxb5 13 c6 Qc8 14 c7 b4 15 Nb5 We are still in theory.

15...a4 It is interesting that both teams feel that this position is good for them. We will see which team did a better job preparing for this game. 16 Rc1 is the move here. But Anand is taking time for this move and he is biting his nails. Did he forget his analysis?

16 Rc1 Ne4 Anand has 2 choices, 17 Ng5 (more aggressive and less well known) and 17 Nd2 (more popular).

17 Ng5 It seems that Magnus is surprised by 17 Ng5. Perhaps he was expecting Nd2. Magnus has a few decent responses. 17...Nxg5 17...Ndf6 or 17...Bxg5. He's taking time to decide how to proceed. Magnus has both hands over his face. He is in deep thought. Difficult decision to make on how to to continue this game.

If 17...Nxg5 18 Bd6 Ra5 19 Bxe7 Rxb5 20 Qxa4 Ra5 21 Qxb4 Ra7 22 Bxg5 Rxc7 23 Rxc7 Qxc7 is a possibility.

17...Ndf6 After about 30 minutes, Magnus chose the safer Ndf6. Wise choice if he can't remember all the analysis. Anand can take the knight of e4 then Bd6 or even Qc2. White is slightly better but Anand also needs to decide how to continue.

18 Nxe4 Nxe4 Interesting choice for Anand here is 19 f3. Anand could not have asked for a better chance. This is super sharp. One mistake by either side and it's over.

19. f3 has been played! Let's see who remembers more home analysis :) This is the 14th game between Carlsen-Anand in the past 2 WC matches. This is the best Anand got out of the opening so far in my opinion. The reason I said this is the best Anand got is because Magnus usually stays away from sharp theorical battles which clearly favor Anand.

19...Ra5 This is a possibility 20 fxe4 Rxb5 21 Qxa4 Ra5 22 Qc6 bxa3 23 exd5 exd5 24 O-O f5 25 Qxb6 Ra6 26 Qb3 Qe6 and White is better.

20 fxe4 Rxb5 21 Qxa4 Ra5 22 Qc6 Anand is up by more than 30 minutes on the clock. It's not that Magnus doesn't know this. But it's clear that he has to recall what he knows, which is costing him a lot of time.

22...bxa3 Let's be clear. Both sides know this line. But it seems that Anand remembers it better & Magnus has to recall what he knows.

23 exd5 We are still in theory. Magnus is thinking between 23...Rxd5 (a better choice) and 23...Bb4+.

23...Rxe5 And the best option for white here is 24 Qxb6. White has a lot to play for. Black's position is cramped.

24 Qxb6 Anand took time for this move, which is the only move top maintain initiatives. Now the plan for Magnus is to put his f8 R on c8. Therefore Qd7 makes sense.

24...Qd7 Now 25 Qa6 to put pressure on the c8 square.

25 0-0 Anand got cold feet and went with a safer option. Magnus only option is to put his Rook on the c file to block the passed pawn.

25...Rc8 Anand has to try to work the c pawn. So the idea is to play Rc6 to stop the mobility of the black queen, then either double up the rooks and Qa6 or move the other Rook to the b file.

26 Rc6 Time will be a serious factor soon. Magnus has about 25 minutes for 15 moves or so without increments. Not an easy task in this position. The problem for Magnus is there is really no "good" plan. And he cannot just sit because Anand can improve his position.

26...g5 27 Bg3 Another option is Be5 to provoke f6 then back to g3.

27...Bb4 A very interesting idea from Magnus. White cannot take the bishop because his rook of c6 is hanging. The idea is Ba5 to attack c7 pawn. Magnus is very clever. He is making Anand calculate this out. He is making it complicated for his opponent :) White is clearly better but has many options to continue: Ra1, Rc2, Qa6 or even Qb8. What to do, what to do? :) Not a good sign. Anand shook his head a few times. I think he's shocked by Bb4 from Magnus.

28. Ra1 This is the best option at this moment and Anand found it. 7 minutes for 12 moves for Magnus without increments. This is getting serious!

28...Ba5 This is a bad move as 29 Qa6 and white is close to winning.

29 Qa6 Bxc7 Another bad move. Now 30 Qc4 and white wins easily.

30 Qc4 I expect resignation to come soon. Impossible to hold this position.

30...e5 31 Bxe5 No chance to save this.

31...Rxe5 32 dxe5 Qe7 Now Rc5 or Rc1 and white will soon be up a rook.

33 e6 This also wins easily.

33...Kf8 34 Rc1 1-0 Magnus resigned. The scored is tied up at 1.5 - 1.5.
Svākkhātaṃ brahmacariyaṃ, sandiṭṭhikam’akālikaṃ,
Yattha amoghā pabbajjā, appamattassa sikkhato.


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directly visible, immediate,
Where not in vain is the going forth
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Dhammanando »

Carlsen after Anand plays 17 Ng5.

Image
Svākkhātaṃ brahmacariyaṃ, sandiṭṭhikam’akālikaṃ,
Yattha amoghā pabbajjā, appamattassa sikkhato.


“The holy life is well proclaimed,
directly visible, immediate,
Where not in vain is the going forth
of one who trains heedfully.”
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Game 4: Draw
Game 5: Draw

Score so far: 2.5 - 2.5
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Game 6: Carlsen wins!

Match score now: 3.5 - 2.5
(best of 12 games; first to 6.5 wins the match)

Game 6, Carlsen–Anand, 1–0

Carlsen played the aggressive Maróczy Bind setup against the Kan Variation of the Sicilian Defence, and accepted a set of isolated doubled pawns in return for active play. At move 26 there was a double blunder as Carlsen was trying to win. Carlsen's 26.Kd2?? should have been answered with 26...Nxe5! (with a discovered attack on the g4-rook) 27.Rxg8 Nxc4+ (zwischenzug) 28.Kd3 Nb2+ 29.Ke2, and Black will wind up with an extra pawn and excellent winning chances. However, Anand did not realize this and played 26...a4?? handing the advantage back to Carlsen that he converted to a win.

Sicilian Defence, Kan Variation
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. c4 Nf6 6. Nc3 Bb4 7. Qd3 Nc6 8. Nxc6 dxc6 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 10. e5 Nd7 11. Bf4 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Kc7 13. h4 b6 14. h5 h6 15. O-O-O Bb7 16. Rd3 c5 17. Rg3 Rag8 18. Bd3 Nf8 19. Be3 g6 20. hxg6 Nxg6 21. Rh5 Bc6 22. Bc2 Kb7 23. Rg4 a5 24. Bd1 Rd8 25. Bc2 Rdg8 26. Kd2 (diagram) a4 27. Ke2 a3 28. f3 Rd8 29. Ke1 Rd7 30. Bc1 Ra8 31. Ke2 Ba4 32. Be4+ Bc6 33. Bxg6 fxg6 34. Rxg6 Ba4 35. Rxe6 Rd1 36. Bxa3 Ra1 37. Ke3 Bc2 38. Re7+ 1-0
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Mkoll »

I've always thought I was an "OK" to "mediocre" chess player. I played chess tournaments as a kid before I became a teenager and my highest rating was somewhere in the 900s. These guys are so amazing I can't even comprehend why they make half their moves!
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by DNS »

Game 7: Draw

6 hours, 23 minutes!!
122 moves!!

The commentators were extremely disappointed that they just missed breaking the record for longest game in a world championship match. The longest game in a World Championship match is still Korchnoi-Karpov, Baguio 1978. It was drawn (stalemate) in 124 moves.

Match score: Carlsen leading 4 - 3

Game 7, Carlsen–Anand, ½–½

Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. 0-0 Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Ke8 10. Nc3 h5 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 Rh6 14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 16. h4 f6 17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 19. f3 Rd8 20. Kf2 Rxd1 21. Nxd1 Nf5 22. Rh1 Bxa2 23. Rxh5 Be6 24. g4 Nd6 25. Rh7 Nf7 26. Ne3 Kd8 27. Nf5 c5 28. Ng3 Ne5 29. Rh8+ Rg8 30. Bxe5 fxe5 31. Rh5 Bxg4 32. fxg4 Rxg4 33. Rxe5 b6 34. Ne4 Rh4 35. Ke2 Rh6 36. b3 Kd7 37. Kd2 Kc6 38. Nc3 a6 39. Re4 Rh2+ 40. Kc1 Rh1+ 41. Kb2 Rh6 42. Nd1 Rg6 43. Ne3 Rh6 44. Re7 Rh2 45. Re6+ Kb7 46. Kc3 Rh4 47. Kb2 Rh2 48. Nd5 Rd2 49. Nf6 Rf2 50. Kc3 Rf4 51. Ne4 Rh4 52. Nf2 Rh2 53. Rf6 Rh7 54. Nd3 Rh3 55. Kd2 Rh2+ 56. Rf2 Rh4 57. c4 Rh3 58. Kc2 Rh7 59. Nb2 Rh5 60. Re2 Rg5 61. Nd1 b5 62. Nc3 c6 63. Ne4 Rh5 64. Nf6 Rg5 65. Re7+ Kb6 66. Nd7+ Ka5 67. Re4 Rg2+ 68. Kc1 Rg1+ 69. Kd2 Rg2+ 70. Ke1 bxc4 71. Rxc4 Rg3 72. Nxc5 Kb5 73. Rc2 a5 74. Kf2 Rh3 75. Rc1 Kb4 76. Ke2 Rc3 77. Nd3+ Kxb3 78. Ra1 Kc4 79. Nf2 Kb5 80. Rb1+ Kc4 81. Ne4 Ra3 82. Nd2+ Kd5 83. Rh1 a4 84. Rh5+ Kd4 85. Rh4+ Kc5 86. Kd1 Kb5 87. Kc2 Rg3 88. Ne4 Rg2+ 89. Kd3 a3 90. Nc3+ Kb6 91. Ra4 a2 92. Nxa2 Rg3+ 93. Kc2 Rg2+ 94. Kb3 Rg3+ 95. Nc3 Rh3 96. Rb4+ Kc7 97. Rg4 Rh7 98. Kc4 Rf7 99. Rg5 Kb6 100. Na4+ Kc7 101. Kc5 Kd7 102. Kb6 Rf1 103. Nc5+ Ke7 104. Kxc6 Rd1 105. Rg6 Kf7 106. Rh6 Rg1 107. Kd5 Rg5+ 108. Kd4 Rg6 109. Rh1 Rg2 110. Ne4 Ra2 111. Rf1+ Ke7 112. Nc3 Rh2 113. Nd5+ Kd6 114. Rf6+ Kd7 115. Nf4 Rh1 116. Rg6 Rd1+ 117. Nd3 Ke7 118. Ra6 Kd7 119. Ke4 Ke7 120. Rc6 Kd7 121. Rc1 Rxc1 122. Nxc1 ½–½
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by chownah »

The commentators were extremely disappointed that they just missed breaking the record for longest game in a world championship match.
This strikes me as very funny! Two men are playing a board game and it takes a long time and alot of moves and people watching are engulfed in the dukkha of extreme disappointment because it didn't take three more moves.....and it was a draw. The two players could have (I guess they could have) just made a couple of meaningless moves at the end and changed the dukkha from extreme disappointment to extreme jubilation!....just think how powerful those three meaningless moves could be. Do those three meaningless moves exist, not exist, neither exist nor not exist, or both exist and not exist?....regardless, what power they have over those watching.
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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by boris »

Playing chess is helpful in forgetting existential pain, unfortunately others don't care about your well-being and want to win with you. That is painful. So in order to escape this pain you can rather teach how to play chess, or take a job of commentator. But since they expect from you that you will comment the game, and without computer you are unable to say something reasonable about game of two strong grandmasters, it's again painful, so you try catch any opportunity to say something ... So there is nothing powerful in those three meaningless moves. :smile:
The man who wants to avoid grotesque collapses should not look for anything to fulfill him in space and time.

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Re: Anand-Carlsen aṃsa dvi

Post by Dhammanando »

chownah wrote:The two players could have (I guess they could have) just made a couple of meaningless moves at the end and changed the dukkha from extreme disappointment to extreme jubilation!....just think how powerful those three meaningless moves could be.
I don't think they could have. On move 122 Carlsen has no choice but to take Anand's rook with his knight, and once that's done neither side has sufficient material to force mate. Under the FIDE Laws of Chess (Article 5.2.b) when a position arises that can only result in a draw, the game comes to an immediate end, provided that the move that led to this position was a legal one. And so I doubt the umpires would have permitted the players to go on making meaningless moves just so that they could establish some new world record.
Svākkhātaṃ brahmacariyaṃ, sandiṭṭhikam’akālikaṃ,
Yattha amoghā pabbajjā, appamattassa sikkhato.


“The holy life is well proclaimed,
directly visible, immediate,
Where not in vain is the going forth
of one who trains heedfully.”
— Sela Sutta
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