Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

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Kim OHara
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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by Kim OHara » Mon Jun 10, 2013 3:57 am

Spiny Norman wrote:
daverupa wrote: "Cafeteria Religion" or "...Buddhism" might be an interesting thread - sure to be full of flame, though...
Yes, it would probably lead to a food fight. :tongue:
Food fight around the barbeque?

:tongue:
Kim

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Kim OHara
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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by Kim OHara » Mon Jun 10, 2013 4:21 am

Kusala wrote: Though not a debate, Ven. S. Dhammika's review of Cioccolanti's From Buddha To Jesus is quite impressive. http://www.scribd.com/doc/13296079/Book ... a-to-Jesus
That's not a review, that's a demolition. :tongue:
Ven Dhammika's main points - that Cioccolanti's book is as ill-informed as it is dishonest seem beyond doubt - but a few of his supporting arguments are not as strong as they might be. e.g.
If Buddhism is really as nonsensical and confused as Cioccolanti claims, why do so many Westerners leave Christianity and embrace it? The 2006 census showed that the number of Buddhists in Australia had jumped by 107% since 1996 (p.8). Cioccolanti is convinced that it cannot be that Buddhism has anything worthwhile to offer, so he has to explain its attraction some other way. His explanation is that actually Westerners are embracing Buddhism as a reaction against Christianity, particularly against the Christian doctrine of sin (p.14).
But Dhammika seems oblivious to the possibility - which is actually the truth - that far more of that increase in Buddhism in Australia is due to immigration from Buddhist countries than to conversion.
Again, Dhammika is extremely derogatory about Cioccolanti's Pali and Sanskrit, but many of the examples he quotes as 'errors' are common Thai consonant-substitutions ... hardly worth worrying about, IMO.
But his other criticisms are more than enough to sink Cioccolanti's book.
:toilet:

:namaste:
Kim

binocular
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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by binocular » Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:16 pm

I am personally interested in the topic of conversion, for my own sake.
I occasionally explore how come other people have converted, hoping for some insight into my own situation.

So far, I have to say I have never met or read of a genuine convert - ie. a person who was genuinely practicing one religion, and then genuinely converted to another one.
As it turns out, the person seemed rather superficial or fanatical about their first/previous religion, and it seemed it was just a matter of time before they'd leave anyway.

manas
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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by manas » Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:00 pm

If we compare Doctrines, Christianity will always appear silly to Buddhists, and Buddhism will appear silly to Christians. But, if we look at things from a different perspective: is this a Path that, if walked sincerely and thoroughly, is capable of effecting an inner transformation in a person - then we could argue that this has occurred in both faiths, not just in one or the other.

If we look at the lives of the Christian mystics and saints, some were indeed noble, kind, self-effacing men and women in the service of Humanity - and they believed in Jesus. Obviously it works for some.
“It would be better for the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person to hold to the body composed of the four great elements, rather than the mind, as the self. Why is that? Because this body composed of the four great elements is seen standing for a year, two years, three, four, five, ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, a hundred years or more. But what’s called ‘mind,’ ‘intellect,’ or ‘consciousness’ by day and by night arises as one thing and ceases as another." - SN 12:61 (excerpt)

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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by Zenainder » Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:04 pm

Marc108,

I grew up and studied Christianity most of my life. I've since "converted" to Buddhism, but if you have any questions or wish from contributions on anything in particular I am happy to contribute. My overall opinion of modern Christianity as it is taught is that it begins with a fearful ultimatum of "turn or burn" and fear, regardless of religion, is not conductive or suitable as a starting point for any spiritual path. I left for much more than that but this was a simple insight that came with finality in leaving Christianity.

Metta,

Zen

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Zenainder
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Re: Christianity, from a Buddhist perspective

Post by Zenainder » Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:15 pm

Similarities worth contemplating:

Repent in the Greek is "Metanoia - 3341" means "a change of mind". If understood more openly its meaning is not to invoke conviction or guilt, instead its meaning is much more inviting. "Metanoia! For the Kingdom of God is at hand!" A perception based invintation away from the religious doctrine in which separates man and God via "sin" in its more convicting understanding.

Sin in the Greek is "hamartéma - 265" means "to miss the mark" or more interestingly "emphasizes the consequences of making any decision (action) by self rather than of faith ("God's inworked persuasion"). Emphasis added by me.

Faith in the Greek is "pistis - 4102" means "be persuaded, come to trust". Helps Word-Studies expounds the idea of faith as a "divine inner persuasion", as the Christian tradition teaches that faith is a gift from God and fundamentally speaking if His Spirit is within the person... the "person" of truth (God) innerly persuades and guides the believer to trust.

Another interesting study of Christian literature is the verse that states that mankind was only separated from God "in their own mind" and seems to hint at perception basis of sin (self based thinking) vs a Christ basis framework of thought. These ideas are rarely discussed in modern theology, but they exist regardless of the fascination the Christian idiom typically has of hell and the fear of being deceived.

A handful of thoughts that I had studied before I converted to Buddhism. Of course my framework of thought is not completely on here, but you may see glimpses of it through what I shared here.

:)

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