The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
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Coëmgenu
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Re: Self-clinging, and the philosophy of "ghosts" in Osgood Perkins' new film

Post by Coëmgenu » Fri Nov 18, 2016 5:16 pm

binocular wrote:
Coëmgenu wrote:The film has very fascinating "Buddhist-seeming" overtones, especially in the way that life as a ghost is framed as a "reincarnation" of sorts, incomplete and caused by self-clinging at the moment of death. The line "held in place by their looking" really struck me. The ghost-birth of the being formerly named Lily Saylor is not Lily Saylor, merely the shade of self-clinging itself.

That struck me as an oddly Buddhist sentiment.
Or just some good dramatic writing.
Hence my label of "Buddhist-seeming" and "oddly Buddhist". ;)
如無為,如是難見、不動、不屈、不死、無漏、覆蔭、洲渚、濟渡、依止、擁護、不流轉、離熾焰、離燒然、流通、清涼、微妙、安隱、無病、無所有、涅槃。
Like this is the uncreated, like this is that which is difficult to realize, with no moving, no bending, no dying. Utterly lacking secretions and smothered in the dark, it is the island shore. Where there is ferrying, it is the crossing. It is dependency's ceasing, it is the end of circulating transmissions. It is the exhaustion of the flame, it is the ending of the burning. Flowing openly, pure and cool, with secret subtlety, and calm occultation, lacking ailment, lacking owning, nirvāṇa.
Asaṁskṛtadharmasūtra, Sermon on the Uncreated Phenomenon, T99.224b7, Saṁyuktāgama 890


binocular
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Re: Self-clinging, and the philosophy of "ghosts" in Osgood Perkins' new film

Post by binocular » Fri Nov 18, 2016 5:56 pm

Coëmgenu wrote:Or just some good dramatic writing.
Hence my label of "Buddhist-seeming" and "oddly Buddhist". ;)[/quote]
Well, maybe the Buddhists are onto something, or good dramatists are onto something, or both are onto something ...
The similarity could be purely co-incidental, or just general.

Or take music from the Classical period, for example. The basic structure of those muscial pieces is -- beginning: fast, cheerful movement; middle: slower, sad movement; finale: in the classical spirit of neither sad nor cheerful, but a kind of goodwilled, upspirited earnestness (adapted of course for the number of movements for each musical form respectively).
Mozart's last piano sonata is a brilliant example of this structure, or Beethoven's Fifth.

One could argue that Classical music has a Buddhist structure, the finale being an example of the middle way.
Every person we save is one less zombie to fight. -- World War Z

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Coëmgenu
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Re: Self-clinging, and the philosophy of "ghosts" in Osgood Perkins' new film

Post by Coëmgenu » Fri Nov 18, 2016 6:17 pm

binocular wrote:
Coëmgenu wrote:
binocular wrote:Or just some good dramatic writing.
Hence my label of "Buddhist-seeming" and "oddly Buddhist". ;)
Well, maybe the Buddhists are onto something, or good dramatists are onto something, or both are onto something ...
The similarity could be purely co-incidental, or just general.

Or take music from the Classical period, for example. The basic structure of those muscial pieces is -- beginning: fast, cheerful movement; middle: slower, sad movement; finale: in the classical spirit of neither sad nor cheerful, but a kind of goodwilled, upspirited earnestness (adapted of course for the number of movements for each musical form respectively).
Mozart's last piano sonata is a brilliant example of this structure, or Beethoven's Fifth.

One could argue that Classical music has a Buddhist structure, the finale being an example of the middle way.
I suppose so. And in that case anything that seemed like a compromise between any two points would also become "Buddhist-seeming", but it was the interesting parallels with self-clinging and rebirth as a ghost that struck me as fascinating, not so much any narrative structure or technique of motivic development. The dukkha of the futility of the objective of self-preservation after death is explored greatly in the film, through the metaphor of the ghost's "half-life", as an unsatisfied "rotting" being, trapped by her insistence on looking back to her past self.
如無為,如是難見、不動、不屈、不死、無漏、覆蔭、洲渚、濟渡、依止、擁護、不流轉、離熾焰、離燒然、流通、清涼、微妙、安隱、無病、無所有、涅槃。
Like this is the uncreated, like this is that which is difficult to realize, with no moving, no bending, no dying. Utterly lacking secretions and smothered in the dark, it is the island shore. Where there is ferrying, it is the crossing. It is dependency's ceasing, it is the end of circulating transmissions. It is the exhaustion of the flame, it is the ending of the burning. Flowing openly, pure and cool, with secret subtlety, and calm occultation, lacking ailment, lacking owning, nirvāṇa.
Asaṁskṛtadharmasūtra, Sermon on the Uncreated Phenomenon, T99.224b7, Saṁyuktāgama 890

binocular
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Re: Self-clinging, and the philosophy of "ghosts" in Osgood Perkins' new film

Post by binocular » Fri Nov 18, 2016 6:52 pm

One can find "Buddhist moments" is many stories.
Whether the author of the story intended them in a Buddhist sense or not, is another matter.

In the thread on Dhamma themed films here, there are many films listed that have no explicit relation to Buddhism, but which can be interpreted as sending a Buddhist message or making a Buddhist point.
Every person we save is one less zombie to fight. -- World War Z

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Coëmgenu
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Re: Self-clinging, and the philosophy of "ghosts" in Osgood Perkins' new film

Post by Coëmgenu » Fri Nov 18, 2016 8:23 pm

binocular wrote:One can find "Buddhist moments" is many stories.
Whether the author of the story intended them in a Buddhist sense or not, is another matter.

In the thread on Dhamma themed films here, there are many films listed that have no explicit relation to Buddhism, but which can be interpreted as sending a Buddhist message or making a Buddhist point.
I didn't know this thread existed. Maybe I should ask a moderator move my post there, since there is already a thread for it.
如無為,如是難見、不動、不屈、不死、無漏、覆蔭、洲渚、濟渡、依止、擁護、不流轉、離熾焰、離燒然、流通、清涼、微妙、安隱、無病、無所有、涅槃。
Like this is the uncreated, like this is that which is difficult to realize, with no moving, no bending, no dying. Utterly lacking secretions and smothered in the dark, it is the island shore. Where there is ferrying, it is the crossing. It is dependency's ceasing, it is the end of circulating transmissions. It is the exhaustion of the flame, it is the ending of the burning. Flowing openly, pure and cool, with secret subtlety, and calm occultation, lacking ailment, lacking owning, nirvāṇa.
Asaṁskṛtadharmasūtra, Sermon on the Uncreated Phenomenon, T99.224b7, Saṁyuktāgama 890

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Kim OHara
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Re: The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Post by Kim OHara » Sun May 07, 2017 10:49 am

Shared from the other Wheel, because I enjoyed it so much:
Buddhism and the Film

:coffee:
Kim

ieee23
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Re: The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Post by ieee23 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:49 pm

The Fourth Nobel Truth

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M6W8LS9


I think it is a great way for non-buddhists to get their first idea of what Buddhism is about.

Its about a jaded movie star sentenced by a judge to get meditation and dhamma lessons after he is arrested for drunk driving.
Whatever a bhikkhu frequently thinks and ponders upon, that will become the inclination of his mind. - MN 19

binocular
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Re: The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Post by binocular » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:03 pm

ieee23 wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:49 pm
The Fourth Nobel Truth
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M6W8LS9
I haven't seen the film yet, but what I find the most amazing is the choice of Hamlin as the lead actor! Sometimes, it's the life stories of actors, their ups and downs in their careers, and their choice of films to act in that is the most amazing and gives me the most to think about.
Every person we save is one less zombie to fight. -- World War Z

binocular
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Re: The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Post by binocular » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:09 pm

All is lost, by J.C. Chandor with Robert Redford.

This film has a radically different pace and setting than what probably most of us are used to, giving the viewer time to reflect on what one is seeing and what one is thinking.
Every person we save is one less zombie to fight. -- World War Z

ieee23
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Re: The obligatory Dhamma themed movie thread

Post by ieee23 » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:05 pm

binocular wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:03 pm
ieee23 wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:49 pm
The Fourth Nobel Truth
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M6W8LS9
I haven't seen the film yet, but what I find the most amazing is the choice of Hamlin as the lead actor! Sometimes, it's the life stories of actors, their ups and downs in their careers, and their choice of films to act in that is the most amazing and gives me the most to think about.
The movie has its own web site, and from what I read there it seems to be a personal project inspired by one of the creators own struggles with their life.
Whatever a bhikkhu frequently thinks and ponders upon, that will become the inclination of his mind. - MN 19

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