Mark Venerables as Venerables

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Dhammanando
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Re: Mark Venerables as Venerables

Post by Dhammanando » Tue Nov 11, 2014 10:27 pm

nekete wrote:Yeah, it's strange, in my opinion, to be a homeless but living in a large generously supported building provided with all the best of modern technology. In my country, homeless people don't live that way.
Okay, I see what you're getting at. Homelessness (anagāriya) for a bhikkhu means (1) the abandonment of home- and property-ownership and (2) the fourfold sīla (i.e. pāṭimokkha-observance, right livelihood, sense-restraint, and proper use of the four requisites). It doesn't mean being peripatetic and of no fixed abode, even if some bhikkhus do at times undertake such a manner of living.

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Anagarika
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Re: Mark Venerables as Venerables

Post by Anagarika » Wed Nov 12, 2014 12:42 am

nekete wrote:
Dhammanando wrote:
nekete wrote:And by the way, isn't it strange to be a homeless but to be able to connect regularly to internet?

(...)
Yeah, it's strange, in my opinion, to be a homeless but living in a large generously supported building provided with all the best of modern technology. In my country, homeless people don't live that way.
One who has ordained has renounced a home of one's own, property, money, and ordinary ties to family. It is a homeless, renunciate life. The Bhikkhus and Bhikkhunis live in a monastery, dependent on the dana and daily alms of the lay folk. If the Wat doesn't well serve the people of the community, the dana may not come forth, so the symbiotic relationship that the Buddha designed is preserved.

If there are people that you consider "homeless" in your country, they are likely not homeless by choice. They are likely homeless due to mental illness, addiction, or financial distress. They have not renounced householder life and gone forth willingly, as a Bhikkhu has. It is beneficial that the monks and nuns have internet connections; this has opened up the Dhamma teachings for many from across the world. There is nothing strange about that.

The Buddha had great concerns toward the end of his life that his Dhamma would be lost. I'd say that the advent of the internet has done some to distort his Dhamma, but at the end of the day, the internet has done a lot to allow Venerables like Dhammanando Bhikkhu and other learned monks and nuns to counsel those around the globe seeking their counsel. The Dhamma has survived, and thrived, thanks in part to the reach of the internet. That's something I'd be willing to bet the Buddha might have seen as skillful and beneficial.

(Edit: I wrote the above, it seems, while Ven. Dhammannando was posting his response...part of what I wrote is unintentionally redundant.)

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mikenz66
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Re: Mark Venerables as Venerables

Post by mikenz66 » Wed Nov 12, 2014 9:06 am

I certainly agree. That we have access to bhikkhus such as Ven Dhammanando online because he makes use of the internet and, particualarly, that I have access to (Thai and other) bhikkhus locally because they make use of airplanes and so on has been essential to me hearing the Dhamma. I don't see any virtue in interpreting the rules so conservatively as to inhibit the spirit of lay-ordained symbiosis that was established by the Buddha and benefits all of us.

:anjali:
Mike

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