Hello

Introduce yourself to others at Dhamma Wheel.
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Willl
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:46 pm

Hello

Post by Willl » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:24 pm

Hi all!

A little about myself: I'm still pretty new to buddhism but not meditation as I've kept up a regular hour a day practice for the last 3 years or so. My approach to meditation and buddhism has been pretty secular, viewing buddhism in general more as a philosophy and drawing back from the more metaphysical aspects of it. I'm still very confused as to where Buddhists stand on the topic of reincarnation for example.

I'm here to learn more about theravada as well as some more advanced guidance for my own meditation practice as I've found it difficult elsewhere online to find people with enough experience to answer my questions.

My own practice started off with very disciplined practice of samatha which lead to becoming pretty experienced in the jhanas. I've spent a lot of time exploring the 4 jhanas although I've not experienced the formless states as far as I know. In the last year my practice has moved much more in the direction of vipassana and mindfulness which always seems to lead me to a quite intense state of infinite boundless awareness. I have a lot of questions regarding this experience and the value of it compared to trying to stay more grounded and present but perhaps that is something to post in more detail elsewhere.

For now, hello to everyone here. I'm excited to learn and grow with this forum.

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Sam Vara
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Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm
Location: Sussex, U.K.

Re: Hello

Post by Sam Vara » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:33 pm

Hello Willl, and welcome to Dhamma Wheel! :hello:

I hope the materials here and discussions with other members will help provide answers to your questions.

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bodom
Posts: 6063
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Hello

Post by bodom » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:51 pm

Welcome!

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


Ultimately, your meditation involves sustaining the knowing, followed by continuous letting go as you experience sense objects through the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body and mind. It involves just this much and there is no need to make anything more out of it.

- Ajahn Chah

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DNS
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Contact:

Re: Hello

Post by DNS » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:28 pm

Welcome to DW!

:buddha2:

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retrofuturist
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Re: Hello

Post by retrofuturist » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:00 pm

Greetings,

Welcome to Dhamma Wheel.

:buddha1:

Metta,
Paul. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"One discerns wrong view as wrong view, and right view as right view. This is one's right view." (MN 117)

SarathW
Posts: 8785
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: Hello

Post by SarathW » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:26 pm

:hello:
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

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xofz
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 11:29 pm
Location: WA, USA
Contact:

Re: Hello

Post by xofz » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:52 pm

Welcome! Isn't meditation pleasurable? As long as our bodies are safe and sound, we can do whatever we want with that mind of ours...
My real life name is Sam.

Meezer77
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 5:43 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Hello

Post by Meezer77 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:59 pm

Hi :anjali:

Nice to meet you. I've got a burning question that's been on my mind for a while. Do you think it's possible for a secular Buddhist to get Jhana?

Apologies if that's too heavy for your first day. Feel free to ignore me

Willl
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:46 pm

Re: Hello

Post by Willl » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:10 am

Hi guys!

meezer77, it's an interesting question and definitely the kind of thing I'm here to discuss. In what way do you think they might not be attainable to a secular Buddhist?

For my part I've always been someone who tries to carve their own path rather than follow anything laid out before me too strictly. The states of absorption themselves don't rely on the belief of anything metaphysical as far as I'm aware? I'll try to outline my experience, perhaps you could point me in the direction of a text that might help me gain some better understanding.

My experience of it is of focusing the mind completely onto the breath, total one pointed focus. After some time the quality of the subject kind of crystallises, each breath becomes like a trickle of pure liquid diamond echoing silently in the vast nothingness within me. I find it only possible to get here once the five hindrances have been abandoned and there is truly no desire for anything to be other than how it is right now. Let everything be.

After some time, if there is truly no desire for it to arise, the first jhana rises like a great unstoppable wave of utterly saturating bliss and pleasure. In full absorption it feels like this bliss has seeped into every synapse and every cell in the body and the breath is totally abandoned. This pleasure then becomes the object of focus.

The rest of the journey through jhana is pretty well documented. I think the depth of absorption can vary a lot. I have found that the abandoning of that first wave of saturating extacy for the subtler realms of happiness and then tranquility to be a process one can go through without being fully immersed, a light jhana if you will.

But certainly when I choose to meditate with the intention of absolute absorption it is a very different experience and I perhaps only experience this once a month or so, largely because I'm never actively trying to get to jhana itself but rather practice samatha meditation for the cultivation of deeper concentration. At the very bottom of the well, in fourth jhana I'm simply held by it. Like a stone at the bottom of a deep pool utterly still and effortless with an endless expanse between my singular unwavering awareness and the world of thought and action.

Meezer77
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 5:43 pm
Location: Scotland

Re: Hello

Post by Meezer77 » Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:19 am

Willl wrote:
Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:10 am
Hi guys!

meezer77, it's an interesting question and definitely the kind of thing I'm here to discuss. In what way do you think they might not be attainable to a secular Buddhist?

For my part I've always been someone who tries to carve their own path rather than follow anything laid out before me too strictly. The states of absorption themselves don't rely on the belief of anything metaphysical as far as I'm aware? I'll try to outline my experience, perhaps you could point me in the direction of a text that might help me gain some better understanding.

My experience of it is of focusing the mind completely onto the breath, total one pointed focus. After some time the quality of the subject kind of crystallises, each breath becomes like a trickle of pure liquid diamond echoing silently in the vast nothingness within me. I find it only possible to get here once the five hindrances have been abandoned and there is truly no desire for anything to be other than how it is right now. Let everything be.

After some time, if there is truly no desire for it to arise, the first jhana rises like a great unstoppable wave of utterly saturating bliss and pleasure. In full absorption it feels like this bliss has seeped into every synapse and every cell in the body and the breath is totally abandoned. This pleasure then becomes the object of focus.

The rest of the journey through jhana is pretty well documented. I think the depth of absorption can vary a lot. I have found that the abandoning of that first wave of saturating extacy for the subtler realms of happiness and then tranquility to be a process one can go through without being fully immersed, a light jhana if you will.

But certainly when I choose to meditate with the intention of absolute absorption it is a very different experience and I perhaps only experience this once a month or so, largely because I'm never actively trying to get to jhana itself but rather practice samatha meditation for the cultivation of deeper concentration. At the very bottom of the well, in fourth jhana I'm simply held by it. Like a stone at the bottom of a deep pool utterly still and effortless with an endless expanse between my singular unwavering awareness and the world of thought and action.
I'm fairly new to Buddhism myself, and would probably describe myself as a "buffet " Buddhist. I used to be a "buffet " catholic. I'm not very knowledgeable about the Jhanas was just something I was curious about. I can barely sit still for an hour so haven't experienced any of these glorious experiences you're talking about

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