Search found 67 matches

by SilaSamadhi
Tue Jan 28, 2020 4:45 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.
Replies: 7
Views: 494

Re: Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.

How about good or bad kamma? Is there anything inherently good or bad about our kamma? Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation of the key suttas about kamma (such as AN 4:232) doesn't use "good" or "bad". It uses "dark" and "bright" kamma. In AN 4:232, the Buddha explains that there are 4 types of kamma: Brigh...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:27 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.
Replies: 7
Views: 494

Re: Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.

Nothing is inherently good or bad? What about dukkha and sukha? Dukkha is a fundamental truth of existence, just like Anicca. It is unskillful to consider it "bad", since all you did by this act of picking-and-choosing is to attach aversively to a fundamental factor of existence. It's a manifestati...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:46 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.
Replies: 7
Views: 494

Kaleidoscope World - the full meaning of anattā.

1. Sabbe saṅkhārā aniccā — "all conditioned things are impermanent" 2. Sabbe saṅkhārā dukkhā — "all conditioned things are unsatisfactory" 3. Sabbe dhammā anattā — "all conditioned and unconditioned things are devoid of inherent identity" -- The Three Marks of Existence In 1641, the philosopher Ren...
by SilaSamadhi
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:44 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?
Replies: 18
Views: 852

Re: Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?

Because while you are going through the fog, you can perceive formes Interesting analogy, but as far as I understand, Saṅkhāra refers to regular forms we perceive in our daily lives, such as objects around us, other people, etc, no? So it's not exactly "fog" or limited perception, but a perception ...
by SilaSamadhi
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:19 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?
Replies: 18
Views: 852

Re: Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?

char101 wrote:
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:11 am
Avijja is not realizing the true nature of things which is anicca, dukkha, anatta. Not knowing these characteristics causes clinging.
According to the Nidānas, Avijjā leads directly to Saṅkhāra. Clinging (Upādāna) is much farther down the chain.
by SilaSamadhi
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:49 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?
Replies: 18
Views: 852

Among the Twelve Nidānas, why does Avijjā lead to Saṅkhāra?

The causal relations between some of the Nidānas seem readily apparent. For instance, it's easy to see why Contact (Phassa) would lead to Sensation (Vedanā), which in turn leads to Craving (Taṇhā), which leads to Clinging (Upādāna). However, why does Ignorance (Avijjā) lead to Fabrications (Saṅkhāra...
by SilaSamadhi
Sat Nov 02, 2019 11:57 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
Replies: 24
Views: 1888

Re: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?

I can't say that I understand it completely but here is a sutta which I think sheds alot of light on the subject: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.044.than.html#fnt-7 It is a long sutta and if you want to just see the part which talks about your question go down to the line "Now, lady...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
Replies: 24
Views: 1888

Re: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?

Perhaps someone can explain, possibly in mundane terms, what a "neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling" is?

Maybe provide some examples?

For example, a pleasant feeling is eating a delicacy when hungry, and a painful feeling is being very hungry. What's a "neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 29, 2019 1:11 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
Replies: 24
Views: 1888

What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?

In Sallattha Sutta (SN 36:6), the Buddha describes how attachment manifests in lust for pleasant feelings: When he seeks delight in sensual pleasure, the underlying tendency to lust for pleasant feeling lies behind this. As well as aversion to painful feelings: Being contacted by that same painful f...
by SilaSamadhi
Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:07 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Is it even possible to kill intentionally, but without any defilements? Yes, the Mahayana sutra provides one example. Another example: you simply have to do it to survive. All of Tibetan Buddhism allows for killing of animals for food because environmental conditions require that. There's actually ...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Care to provide the exact Mahayana text that specifically stated that "killing a human, if done without dosa (rage/ill-will), yields no negative results. In fact, if driven by meritorious intention, it will be a meritorious act generating positive results."?? I learned of it from DNS's comment, but...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

He said, therefore, he wouldn't be found in hell To end up in hell, you need to incur dark karma, which in would result from acting with attached intentions, that is in this case out of dosa. If a noble disciple kills without dosa or any other affliction, I don't see why that would send them to hel...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 6:12 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

There is a Mahayana story about the buddha killing in a past life, but not in the final existence as Gotama. Very interesting story. It states that far from being an unskillful and counter-productive act, the killing performed by the Buddha in this case yielded merit for him! Thus the story reflect...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:31 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

there would have been much that the Buddha could have done to prevent a murderer from killing him. Sure, but my focus in this question is precisely on a scenario where there is no choice : the Buddha either kills the murderer, or is killed by the murderer and thus prevented from teaching his newly ...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 37
Views: 1878

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Actually an almost exact scenario did happen and see the good ending at Angulimala Sutta Not quite "almost exact scenario" since in my scenario, the Buddha had a choice between killing the murderer and being killed himself - before he had the chance to teach his newly-discovered dharma. In the Angu...