Search found 60 matches

by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
Replies: 23
Views: 448

Re: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?

Perhaps someone can explain, possibly in mundane terms, what a "neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling" is?

Maybe provide some examples?

For example, a pleasant feeling is eating a delicacy when hungry, and a painful feeling is being very hungry. What's a "neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 29, 2019 1:11 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?
Replies: 23
Views: 448

What is "the underlying tendency to ignorance in regard to neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling"?

In Sallattha Sutta (SN 36:6), the Buddha describes how attachment manifests in lust for pleasant feelings: When he seeks delight in sensual pleasure, the underlying tendency to lust for pleasant feeling lies behind this. As well as aversion to painful feelings: Being contacted by that same painful f...
by SilaSamadhi
Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:07 am
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Is it even possible to kill intentionally, but without any defilements? Yes, the Mahayana sutra provides one example. Another example: you simply have to do it to survive. All of Tibetan Buddhism allows for killing of animals for food because environmental conditions require that. There's actually ...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Care to provide the exact Mahayana text that specifically stated that "killing a human, if done without dosa (rage/ill-will), yields no negative results. In fact, if driven by meritorious intention, it will be a meritorious act generating positive results."?? I learned of it from DNS's comment, but...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

He said, therefore, he wouldn't be found in hell To end up in hell, you need to incur dark karma, which in would result from acting with attached intentions, that is in this case out of dosa. If a noble disciple kills without dosa or any other affliction, I don't see why that would send them to hel...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 6:12 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

There is a Mahayana story about the buddha killing in a past life, but not in the final existence as Gotama. Very interesting story. It states that far from being an unskillful and counter-productive act, the killing performed by the Buddha in this case yielded merit for him! Thus the story reflect...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:31 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

there would have been much that the Buddha could have done to prevent a murderer from killing him. Sure, but my focus in this question is precisely on a scenario where there is no choice : the Buddha either kills the murderer, or is killed by the murderer and thus prevented from teaching his newly ...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Re: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Actually an almost exact scenario did happen and see the good ending at Angulimala Sutta Not quite "almost exact scenario" since in my scenario, the Buddha had a choice between killing the murderer and being killed himself - before he had the chance to teach his newly-discovered dharma. In the Angu...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?
Replies: 36
Views: 695

Would the Buddha kill a human for the greater good?

Imagine that moments after his full awakening, the Buddha encountered on the road a murderer, intent on killing him, and the Buddha's only option to survive was to kill the murderer. Considering the incredible benefit to humanity from the Buddha's continued existence and opportunity to teach, compar...
by SilaSamadhi
Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:42 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

If one keeps asking how something arises, then one is probably operating out of the assumption that it once/somewhere/somehow wasn't there. Or one is just curious. Again, if I'm wondering about the cause of gravity, it does not mean I assume that it "wasn't there" at some past point, or that it car...
by SilaSamadhi
Sat Jul 27, 2019 4:52 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

"And what is ignorance, what is the origin of ignorance, what is the cessation of ignorance, what is the way leading to the cessation of ignorance? Not knowing about dukkha, not knowing about the origin of dukkha, not knowing about the cessation of dukkha, not knowing about the way leading to the c...
by SilaSamadhi
Sat Jul 27, 2019 4:48 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

binocular wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:14 pm
If the question is important to you, then it is necessarily a moral issue.
Not necessarily. I'm interested in why objects fall down when dropped. No moral aspect to this question, but it's a prominent feature of my environment.
by SilaSamadhi
Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:05 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

It's the narrative in some religions/spiritualities that explains how we (or mankind in general) were once good, pure, and worthy, and then came into a place of woe (ie. life on Earth); and why we need a particular religion/spirituality to again become good, pure, and worthy. First of all, as my or...
by SilaSamadhi
Fri Jul 26, 2019 3:28 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

This would appear to be the main problem with any attempt to provide a narrative which involves an absolute or an unconditioned. Right, the problem is that we are having this discussion in a verbal (i.e. conceptual) medium, while the absolute is (aka the unborn, the unconditioned) is not conceptual...
by SilaSamadhi
Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:51 pm
Forum: General Theravāda discussion
Topic: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.
Replies: 92
Views: 1886

Re: All attachment and suffering are fundamentally voluntary.

If this question still stands, you still have an original fall scenario. Can you perhaps explain what you mean by "original fall" exactly? I am not very familiar with this idea, but even the few major essentials I know about "original fall" in Christianity will not be propositions I put forth or ag...