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SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases - Dhamma Wheel

SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

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SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:44 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:57 am

SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta - The Seven Points

Translated by Bhikkhu Ñanananda


At Saavatthi... Then the Exalted One said:

"A monk who is skilled in the seven points, monks, who is an investigator in three ways, is called 'accomplished' [52] in this Norm and Discipline, one who has reached mastership, superman.

"And how, monks, is a monk skilled in the seven points?

"Herein, monks, a monk fully understands form, the arising of form, the ceasing of form, and the path leading to the ceasing of form. He fully understands the satisfaction there is in form, the misery that is in form, the escape from form.

"He fully understands feeling...

"He fully understands perception...

"He fully understands formations...

"He fully understands consciousness, the arising of consciousness, the ceasing of consciousness, and the path leading to the ceasing of consciousness. He fully understands the satisfaction there is in consciousness, the misery that is in consciousness, the escape from consciousness.

"And what, monks, is form? It is the four great elements, and that form which is dependent on the four great elements. From the arising of nutriment comes the arising of form: from the ceasing of nutriment is the ceasing of form: and the path leading to the ceasing of form is this Noble Eightfold Path, to wit: Right Views, Right Thoughts, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration.

"That pleasure, that happiness, which arises because of form, that is the satisfaction that is in form. In so far as form is impermanent, is fraught with suffering and is liable to change, that is the misery that is in form. That restraint, of desire and lust, that putting away of desire and lust which are in form, that is the escape from form.

"Whatsoever recluses and brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding form, its arising, its ceasing and the path leading to its ceasing, by thus fully understanding the satisfaction that is in form, the misery that is in form, and escape from form, are treading towards the disgust for, the detachment from and the cessation of, form, they are rightly treading. They that are rightly treading, are firm grounded in this Norm and Discipline.

"And whatever recluses or brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding form, its arising, its ceasing, and the path leading to its ceasing, by thus fully understanding the satisfaction, the misery and the escape from form, are liberated without grasping, due to their disgust for, detachment from and cessation of form — they are truly liberated. They that are truly liberated, are 'accomplished,' and to them that are 'accomplished' there is no whirling round for purposes of designation.[53]

"And what, monks, is feeling?

"Monks, there are these six classes of feeling, to wit: feeling that is born of contact with eye, feeling that is born of contact with ear... nose... tongue... body... mind. This, monks, is called feeling. From the arising of contact comes the arising of feeling; from the ceasing of contact is the ceasing of feeling; and the path leading to the ceasing of feeling is this Noble Eightfold Path, to wit: Right Views... Right Concentration.

"That pleasure, that happiness, which arises because of feeling — that is the satisfaction that is in feeling. In so far as feeling is impermanent, fraught with suffering, and liable to change, this is the misery that is in feeling. That restraint of desire and lust, that putting away of desire and lust which are in feeling, that is the escape from feeling.

"Now whatsoever recluses or brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding feeling, its arising, its ceasing, and the path leading to its ceasing; by thus fully understanding the satisfaction, the misery, that is in feeling and the escape from feeling, are treading towards the disgust for, the detachment from and the cessation of, feeling, they are rightly treading. They that are rightly treading, are firm grounded in this Norm and Discipline.

"And whatsoever recluses and brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding feeling... are liberated without grasping, due to their disgust for, detachment from, and cessation of, feeling — they are truly liberated. They that are truly liberated, are 'accomplished,' and for them that are 'accomplished,' there is no whirling round for purposes of designation.

"And what, monks, is perception?

"Monks, there are these six classes of perception, perception of form, perception of sound, of smell, taste, tangibles and ideas; that, monks, is called perception. From the arising of contact, comes the arising of perception; from the ceasing of contact, is the ceasing of perception; and the path leading to the ceasing of perception is this Noble Eightfold Path, to wit: Right Views... Right Concentration... [as above]... there is no whirling round for purposes of designation.

"And what, monks, are the formations?

"Monks, there are these six classes of intentions. The intention of forms, the intention of sounds, of smells, of tastes, of tangibles and of ideas. These, monks, are called formations. From the arising of contact, comes the arising of formations; from the ceasing of contact, is the ceasing of formations; and the path leading to the ceasing of formations is this Noble Eightfold Path, to wit: Right views... Right Concentration... [as above]... there is no whirling round for purposes of designation.

"And what, monks, is consciousness?

"Monks, there are these six classes of consciousness: eye-consciousness, ear-consciousness, nose-consciousness, tongue-consciousness, body-consciousness, and mind-consciousness. From the arising of 'name-and-form' comes the arising of consciousness; from the ceasing of name-and-form, is the ceasing of consciousness; and the path leading to the ceasing of consciousness is this Noble Eightfold Path, to wit: Right Views... Right Concentration.

"That pleasure, that happiness which arises because of consciousness — that is the satisfaction which is in consciousness. In so far as consciousness is impermanent, fraught with suffering, and liable to change, this is the misery that is in consciousness. That restraint of desire and lust, that putting away of desire and lust which are in consciousness, that is the escape from consciousness.

"Now whatsoever recluses or brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding consciousness, its arising, its ceasing, and the path leading to its ceasing; by thus fully understanding the satisfaction, the misery, that is in consciousness and the escape from consciousness, are treading towards the disgust for, the detachment from and the cessation of consciousness, they are rightly treading. They that are rightly treading, are firm grounded in this Norm and Discipline.

"And whatsoever recluses and brahmans, monks, by thus fully understanding consciousness, its arising, its ceasing, and the path leading to its ceasing, by thus fully understanding the satisfaction, the misery and the escape from consciousness are liberated without grasping, due to their disgust for, detachment from, and cessation of consciousness — they are truly liberated. They that are truly liberated, are 'accomplished,' and to them that are 'accomplished,' there is no whirling round for purposes of designation.

"In this way, monks, is a monk skilled in the seven points.

"And how, monks, is a monk an investigator of the three ways?

"As to that, monks, a monk investigates things by way of the elements,[54] by way of sense-spheres,[55] by way of Dependent Arising[56].

"That is how, monks, a monk becomes an investigator of the three ways.

"A monk who is skilled in the seven points, monks, who is an investigator of the three ways — he is called 'accomplished' in this Norm and Discipline, one who has reached mastership, superman."


Notes:

[52] 'Kevalii' is 'one who lives by oneself — a-lone.' The sense of completeness, of being fully integrated and accomplished, is also implicit. The primary sense seems to emerge for instance at Sn. v. 490: 'Those who wander in the world unattached, possessionless, alone, and self-controlled' ('ye ve asattaa vicaranti loke — aki.ncanaa kevalino yatattaa'). This 'being alone,' however, has a deeper significance for the arahant, even as his being possessionless (See above, Note 14 ). It refers to the arahant's non-entanglement in name-and-form. (See above, Note 13 ). He has put an end to name-and-form ('pariyanta.m akaasi naamaruupa.m' — Sn. v. 537) and it is no longer reflected or manifest in his consciousness. At S. III 105 [SN 22.83 ] it is said that the notion 'I-am' occurs when one reflects upon the five aggregates, just as in the case of one looking at his own image reflected in a mirror or in a bowl of water. Thus the very conceit 'I-am' (asmimaana), being a form of measuring, is essentially dependent and relative. Paradoxically enough, it reveals a split in living experience, since all identification presupposes a duality. The arahant who is free from that conceit does not rely on standards of judgment (See eg. Sn. vv. 842, 894 [Sn 4.9 , Sn 4.12 ]), and is therefore truly alone, fully integrated and accomplished. His is a completeness born of inner concord due to the fact that his consciousness does not 'dwell' anywhere. 'They say it is a concord* for a monk who, completely withdrawn from the world resorts to a secluded spot, in that he does not show himself in existence:'
Patiliinacarassa bhikkhuno bhajamaanassa vivittamaasana.m saamaggiyamaahu tassa ta.m yo attaana.m bhavane na dassaye

— Sn. v. 810.

[Sn 4.6 ]

*The word 'saamaggiyam,' though explained by the Comm. (Sn. A.) to mean 'fit and proper' ('patiruupa.m'), seems to have a significance of its own, as suggested by the context. (Note: 'They say it is a 'saamaggiya' for him...') It connotes the inner concord of the fully-integrated arahant, its primary sense being 'concord' or 'unanimity,' in a social context.


[53] 'ye kevalino va.t.tam tesa.m natthi pa~n~napanaaya: (See above, Note 51 ). The 'whirling-round' is no more for the arahants since the counterpart of consciousness — 'name-and-form' — is no longer 'present.' This too is suggestive of the solitude meant by the term 'kevali.'

[54] The eighteen elements are: eye, visual object, eye-consciousness; ear, sound, ear-consciousness; nose, odor, nose-consciousness; tongue, taste, tongue-consciousness; body, tangibles, body-consciousness; mind, ideas, mind-consciousness.

[55] The twelve spheres of sense: eye, visual object; ear, sound; nose, odor; tongue, taste; body, tangible object; mind, idea. These are usually divided into two groups as 'inner' (ajjhattika) and 'outer' (baahira), the former comprising the six senses, and the latter, their respective objects.

[56] This refers to the 'contemplation of the rise-and-fall' (udayabbayaanupassanaa) of the Five Aggregates of Grasping (pa.ncupaadaanakkhandhaa) in accordance with the principle of Pa.ticca Samuppaada, as, for instance, set forth at S. II. 28:

'Thus is form; thus is its arising; thus is its passing away.

'Thus is feeling; thus is its arising; thus is its passing away.

'Thus is perception; thus is its arising; thus is its passing away.

'Thus is formations; thus is their arising; thus is their passing away.

'Thus is consciousness; thus is its arising; thus is its passing away.

Thus: 'this' being, 'that' becomes; from the arising of this, that arises; this not being, that becomes not; from the ceasing of this, that ceases.

That is to say, conditioned by ignorance, formations come to pass; conditioned by formations, consciousness comes to pass; conditioned by consciousness, name-and-form, conditioned by name-and-form the sixfold sense-sphere, contact; conditioned by contact, feeling, conditioned by feeling, craving; conditioned by craving, grasping; conditioned by grasping, becoming; conditioned by becoming, birth; conditioned by birth, old-age and death, sorrow, lamentation, suffering, grief and despair come to pass. Such is the arising of this entire mass of suffering. But from the utter fading away and cessation of that very ignorance comes the cessation of formations; from the cessation of formations, the cessation of consciousness... from the cessation of birth, old-age and death, sorrow, lamentation, suffering, grief and despair cease. Such is the cessation of this entire mass of suffering.'

This 'investigation by way of Dependent Arising' is an illustration of the practical application of that law in order to understand the structure of experience. By tracing experience to its very source — ignorance — one understands the cumulative process (upacaya — M. III 287 [MN 148 ]) whereby the Five Aggregates of Grasping come into existence. 'Attention-by-way-of-matrix' (yonisomanasikaara) is an integral element in the law of Dependent Arising, as the Mahaapadaana Sutta (D. II 31ff [DN 14]) clearly reveals. Ignorance, when discovered, is transmuted into Knowledge, and as such, the outcome of this yonisomanasikaara is the destruction of that foundation on which the structure of sense-experience rests precariously balanced.

The three ways of investigation would thus lead to a comprehension of the three basic categories, 'khandhaa' (aggregates), 'aayatanaani' (spheres) and 'dhaatuyo' (elements).

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby Individual » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:03 am

The best things in life aren't things.


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:07 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby BlackBird » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:13 am

"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:21 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:24 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby BlackBird » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:30 am

Last edited by BlackBird on Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:33 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby Individual » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:35 am

The best things in life aren't things.


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby BlackBird » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:39 am

"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby Individual » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:40 am

The best things in life aren't things.


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby BlackBird » Wed Nov 17, 2010 1:43 am

"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." -

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 2:09 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 2:17 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby alan » Wed Nov 17, 2010 2:53 am

Thank you, Mike. This is a good post.
Better way of seeing if anyone is paying attention might be to ask for a summary of the basic teaching. (Have to admit I'm not big into lists).
So I'll take a shot: No sense experience is ever satisfying, due to their changing nature. Understand that, and realize liberation through lack of clinging.

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby alan » Wed Nov 17, 2010 3:06 am

Isn't that the message repeated throughout SN 22?

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 17, 2010 3:15 am


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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby alan » Wed Nov 17, 2010 4:15 am

List this, list that. I don't care about lists. I'm interested in understanding.

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Re: SN 22.57: Sattatthana Sutta — Seven Bases

Postby rowyourboat » Wed Nov 17, 2010 3:14 pm

Hi Mike

Great class you got going there! Good luck with it. :anjali:

with metta

RYB/Matheesha
With Metta

Karuna
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