in the united states?

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.

Re: in the united states?

Postby dhammastudier » Sat May 29, 2010 5:07 pm

cooran wrote:Since the Buddha's time, the teachings have traditionally been given away free of charge, passing freely from teacher to student, from friend to friend. The teachings are regarded as priceless, and have been conveyed to us across the centuries by an unbroken stream of generosity — the very foundation of all the Buddha's teachings. I would investigate closely anyone charging for the Buddha's teachings, and I would completely avoid anyone charging dearly for them.

It may be that, if a private venue has been hired, that separate charges are made for accommodation - but the Dhamma Teachings should always be freely given.

As an example, Bodhi Tree Monastery (the home of Buddhanet.net), like most Theravada monasteries, does not impose a charge for Retreats - food, accommodation or Teachings. Most yogis, of course, give Dana generously - but this is by choice, and no note is taken of who gives and who does not.

with metta
Chris


cool that's what i was figuring. if someone is making you pay for that type of thing it's probably a scam artist who is book-learned on the topic and will hold you in a slow moving state of learning to keep the money flowing. and if not that, it's a person who is not very mastered in the art as they are not generous and compassionate toward the poor. i've already trained with a master and some nuns for free many times so i think that's proof alone.
User avatar
dhammastudier
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 4:28 am

Re: in the united states?

Postby hamishmarshal » Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:03 pm

Refugees from war in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos settle in USA and Europe, establishing many tight-knit Buddhist communities in the West. Ven. Taungpulu Sayadaw. Lay meditation centers grow in popularity in USA and Europe. First Theravada forest monastery in the USA (Bhavana Society) is established in West Virginia. Amaravati Buddhist Monastery. Then it continued western expansion of the Theravada Sangha monasteries from the thai forest traditions established in California, USA (Metta Forest Monastery).
hamishmarshal
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 12:36 pm

Re: in the united states?

Postby dhammastudier » Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:48 pm

hamishmarshal wrote:Refugees from war in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos settle in USA and Europe, establishing many tight-knit Buddhist communities in the West. Ven. Taungpulu Sayadaw. Lay meditation centers grow in popularity in USA and Europe. First Theravada forest monastery in the USA (Bhavana Society) is established in West Virginia. Amaravati Buddhist Monastery. Then it continued western expansion of the Theravada Sangha monasteries from the thai forest traditions established in California, USA (Metta Forest Monastery).


um... ok... thanx?
User avatar
dhammastudier
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 4:28 am

Re: in the united states?

Postby Goob » Fri Feb 08, 2013 1:48 pm

Reanimation!

What is the visa situation when it comes to europeans ordaining in the states? Seeing how a U.S citizenship is pretty desireable for many people around the world, and you generally would have to be skilled or get married to get a residency, are internationals given some sort of religious worker sponsorship or something?
Goob
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:14 pm

Re: in the united states?

Postby Goob » Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:29 pm

I'll try my luck again. Can a person with a European citizenship ordain in the United States without acquiring a Green Card the "normal" way? My guess is no, but may there be some sort of religious visa or something?
Goob
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:14 pm

Re: in the united states?

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Jun 25, 2013 3:26 am

richard_rca wrote:I'll try my luck again. Can a person with a European citizenship ordain in the United States without acquiring a Green Card the "normal" way? My guess is no, but may there be some sort of religious visa or something?


As far as I know, it is done the 'normal' way; which in the case of ordaining, would be the temple in the U.S. sponsoring you and basically guaranteeing that you will be a clergy member at their temple. It doesn't speed up the process, but doesn't delay it either, it will still take several years.
User avatar
David N. Snyder
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8115
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: in the united states?

Postby Goob » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:20 am

Aha, so basically it would be the same deal as for when a company sponsors someone as an employee? I'm guessing there's a lot of paperwork involved in that process but does anyone know the details regarding a sponshorship like that and how long it would take before the government approves of it?
Goob
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:14 pm

Re: in the united states?

Postby Goob » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:27 am

Found some information: http://www.youradwokat.com/documents/ne ... tution.pdf

Seems like there is something called an R-1 Visa that allows people to come and stay temporarily as religious workers. Interesting.
Goob
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:14 pm

Previous

Return to Ordination and Monastic Life

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest