Burmese tradition without formal meditation

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Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby derwaldgaenger » Tue Dec 10, 2013 6:01 pm

In one of podcasts of Mahayana teacher I heard about Burmese tradition, that have not formal meditation, only awareness practice.

Even at retreats, participants should do only simple everyday tasks and should be aware what in these tasks they like, dislike and indifferent.

Could somebody tell me something about teachers of these tradition?
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Tue Dec 10, 2013 8:03 pm

Perhaps you were listening to Thich Nhat Hanh?

Mindfulness of Daily Activities is part of formal meditation practice in the Burmese tradition. One should also apply these principles in daily life, when not on a retreat, but one still needs to do some formal meditation whenever possible.

A Discourse on the Mālukyaputta Sutta also explains about how to practice bare awareness. Having heard the teachings, Mālukyaputta, went away and practised, becoming an Arahant.

The same teaching was given to Bāhiya, who had very mature perfections. He attained Arahantship on hearing a very brief teaching from the Buddha, while he was on his almsround. He was singled out by the Buddha as the one who gained Arahantship faster than anyone else. Some meditators thinks this means that they can also gain “instant enlightnement” by practising this method. If only! With inferior perfections, we will have to work hard to develop bare awareness, until it is strong enough to lead to deep insights.
Last edited by Bhikkhu Pesala on Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby robertk » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:10 am

there is ajahn Naeb tradition
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby kmath » Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:45 am

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:The same teaching was given to Bāhiya, who was had very mature perfections. He attained Arahantship on hearing a very brief teaching from the Buddha, while he was on his almsround. He was singled out by the Buddha as the one who gained Arahantship faster than anyone else. Some meditators thinks this means that they can also gain “instant enlightnement” by practising this method. If only! With inferior perfections, we will have to work hard to develop bare awareness, until it is strong enough to lead to deep insights.org/guidelines


I've never heard it explained like that. Thanks!

:anjali:
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:03 am

robertk wrote:there is ajahn Naeb tradition
There is, but that is a Thai tradition, not Burmese.
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby Mkoll » Wed Dec 11, 2013 12:28 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:The same teaching was given to Bāhiya, who was had very mature perfections.


Indeed. He was able to communicate with a devata who was a former blood-relation of his before he had even heard of the Buddha.

Now while he was in seclusion, this reflection arose in the mind of Bahiya of the Bark-cloth: "Am I one of those in the world who are arahats or who have entered the path to arahatship?"

Then a devata who was a former blood-relation of Bahiya of the Bark-cloth understood that reflection in his mind. Being compassionate and wishing to benefit him, he approached Bahiya and said: "You, Bahiya, are neither an arahant nor have you entered the path to arahatship. You do not follow that practice whereby you could be an arahant or enter the path to arahatship."

"Then, in the world including the devas, who are arahats or have entered the path to arahatship?"

"There is, Bahiya, in a far country a town called Savatthi. There the Lord now lives who is the Arahant, the Fully Enlightened One. That Lord, Bahiya, is indeed an arahant and he teaches Dhamma for the realization of arahatship."

Then Bahiya of the Bark-cloth, profoundly stirred by the words of that devata, then and there departed from Supparaka.
--Ud 1.10
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby derwaldgaenger » Wed Dec 11, 2013 7:41 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:Perhaps you were listening to Thich Nhat Hanh?

Thank you for your answer :) No, this speaker were Ken McLeod :) He told about small burmese tradition, that absolutely have not formal meditation.
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby bodom » Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:03 pm

Perhaps Sayadaw U Tejaniya?

http://sayadawutejaniya.org/teachings/

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby derwaldgaenger » Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:54 pm

bodom wrote:Perhaps Sayadaw U Tejaniya?

http://sayadawutejaniya.org/teachings/

:anjali:


Thank you, but this tradition must have not formal meditations :(
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby piano piano » Mon Feb 03, 2014 11:26 am

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
robertk wrote:there is ajahn Naeb tradition
There is, but that is a Thai tradition, not Burmese.


It actually is of Burmese origin. Achan Naeb's teacher was a Burmese monk.

She is telling that in her story how she met him

" Then unexpectedly I had a chance to meet with a Burmese monk. Burmese people are very religious. They make merit regularly. The Burmese always make merit, believing that it helps support life. When they start a new business, at whatever place, with the purpose of making merit they build a Wat near the area and invite monks to come and stay. There were some Burmese people who had a gem mine in the jungle at Kanchanaburi province [Thailand]. They invited a Burmese monk to stay there for a year, and then took him back home. [27]

Later on, because of his reputation, some other Burmese in Talat Noi, Bangkok, invited this monk again. They invited him because he was an expert in the Three Baskets. He was really an expert—it took him fifteen years to complete his studies. It’s not that he merely graduated from studying the Baskets and that was enough. Once he’d completed his studies, he still had to adapt the meaning or substance of everything he had learned to make the different teachings compatible with each other. Sometimes the same thing is described one way in the Basket of Discourses(Suttanta), another way in the Basket of Phenomenology(Abhidhamma), and another way in the Basket of Discipline(Vinaya) [the same thing may be called by different names even though the meaning is the same]. If the whole range of meaning of a particular teaching is not understood, one will not see how the different descriptions are actually consistent with each other. "

http://dhammagarden.jimdo.com/texts/tex ... b-s-story/

Achan Naeb attained stream-entry after a few months practising with this monk. And it is indeed a practice where you do no formal meditation, at least no sitting meditation as we know it.
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby Goofaholix » Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:43 pm

derwaldgaenger wrote:
bodom wrote:Perhaps Sayadaw U Tejaniya?

http://sayadawutejaniya.org/teachings/

:anjali:


Thank you, but this tradition must have not formal meditations :(


I agree with Bodom it sounds like Sayadaw U Tejaniya is described, while there is sitting and walking meditation there is no technique as such, I remember Sayadaw being asked why do people meditate at the centre when the teaching is about moment to moment awareness and he replied "So they don't go around getting themselves into trouble".
"Proper effort is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake each moment." - Ajahn Chah
"When we see beyond self, we no longer cling to happiness. When we stop clinging, we can begin to be happy." - Ajahn Chah
"Know and watch your heart. It’s pure but emotions come to colour it." — Ajahn Chah
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Re: Burmese tradition without formal meditation

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:48 pm

bodom wrote:Perhaps Sayadaw U Tejaniya?

http://sayadawutejaniya.org/teachings/

:anjali:

No. He was ordained in 1996. Ajahn Naeb is from a completely different generation. The article linked to above is a talk given by Ajahn Naeb in 1976.
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