SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

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SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:36 am

SN 48.10 PTS: S v 197 CDB ii 1671
Indriya-vibhanga Sutta: Analysis of the Mental Faculties
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


A summary of the five mental faculties: conviction, persistence, mindfulness, concentration, and discernment.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html



"Monks, there are these five faculties. Which five? The faculty of conviction, the faculty of persistence, the faculty of mindfulness, the faculty of concentration, the faculty of discernment.

"Now what is the faculty of conviction? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, has conviction, is convinced of the Tathagata's Awakening: 'Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened, blessed.' This is called the faculty of conviction.

"And what is the faculty of persistence? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, keeps his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful mental qualities and taking on skillful mental qualities. He is steadfast, solid in his effort, not shirking his duties with regard to skillful mental qualities. He generates desire, endeavors, arouses persistence, upholds & exerts his intent for the sake of the non-arising of evil, unskillful qualities that have not yet arisen... for the sake of the abandoning of evil, unskillful qualities that have arisen... for the sake of the arising of skillful qualities that have not yet arisen... [and] for the maintenance, non-confusion, increase, plenitude, development, & culmination of skillful qualities that have arisen. This is called the faculty of persistence.

"And what is the faculty of mindfulness? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, is mindful, highly meticulous, remembering & able to call to mind even things that were done & said long ago. He remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. He remains focused on feelings in & of themselves... the mind in & of itself... mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. This is called the faculty of mindfulness.

"And what is the faculty of concentration? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, making it his object to let go, attains concentration, attains singleness of mind. Quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, he enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. With the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, he enters & remains in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of composure, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. With the fading of rapture, he remains equanimous, mindful, & alert, and senses pleasure with the body. He enters & remains in the third jhana, of which the Noble Ones declare, 'Equanimous & mindful, he has a pleasant abiding.' With the abandoning of pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation & distress — he enters & remains in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity & mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. This is called the faculty of concentration.

"And what is the faculty of discernment? There is the case where a monk, a disciple of the noble ones, is discerning, endowed with discernment of arising & passing away — noble, penetrating, leading to the right ending of stress. He discerns, as it has come to be: 'This is stress... This is the origination of stress... This is the cessation of stress... This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress.' This is called the faculty of discernment.

"These are the five faculties."


See also:
AN 8.30. http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby kirk5a » Tue Mar 05, 2013 2:29 pm

"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230

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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby santa100 » Tue Mar 05, 2013 3:49 pm


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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby daverupa » Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:22 pm


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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby kirk5a » Wed Mar 06, 2013 1:01 am

"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230

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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby Sam Vara » Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:15 pm

I really like basing practice upon the five Indriyas - there is a lot to think about in there. Recently I was explaining to a friend about how I find the Indriyas particularly accessible because they are similar to the Greek conception of virtues. Things to be cultivated and made much of, which will lead to the improvement of our character. He corrected me by saying that these are not about cultivating a particular type of character; rather, they have the ability to disband character here and now.
For example, the Buddha elsewhere says that complete cultivation of the indriyas destroys the taints and realises final knowledge (SN 48:48); as if they could be used as a substitute for the Eightfold Path itself.
Elsewhere, however (SN 48:7) the Buddha treats each of the faculties as he does the phenomenon of Dukkha in more familiar settings. Faith is to be understood, its origin, its cessation, and the way leading to its cessation. Energy is to be understood...etc.
Bhikkhu Bodhi explains this by saying that the Indriyas can also be seen "not simply as factors conducive to enlightenment, but as members of a broader scheme of phenomenological categories parallel to the aggregates,sense bases, and elements". (Introduction to the Mahavagga, p. 1509.)
As I said, deep stuff.
Also worth noting is the fact that pairing off Faith/Wisdom and Energy/Concentration with Mindfulness left as a balancing factor is commentarial, rather than from the Suttas themselves. The only sutta I can find which speaks of their relationship is 48:50, which gives them as clearly sequential.

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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:19 am


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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:26 am

See also the discussion of the five faculties and the seven factors of awakening here:
viewtopic.php?f=25&t=14239#p209667

Also the discussion of the faculties by Thanissaro Bhikkhu in Wings to Awakening
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ml#part2-e

:anjali:
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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby Sam Vara » Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:13 am


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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby Nyorai » Sun Mar 10, 2013 6:41 am

ImageTo become vegetarian is to step into the stream which leads to nirvana.
If you light a lamp for somebody, it will also brighten your path. He who experiences the unity of life sees his own Self in all beings, and all beings in his own Self.Image

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Re: SN 48.10:Indriya-vibhanga Sutta—Analysis of the Faculties

Postby kizma » Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:35 am



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