Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

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Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:05 am

Dear David/Members,

I wonder why some Bodhi Tree pictures were gone...so I would like to post some:

Bodhi Tree
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Sal(Sala) Tree
Religious significance

Queen Māyā giving birth to the Buddha
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In Hindu tradition, the sal tree is said to be favoured by Vishnu.[3] Its name shala, shaal or sal, comes from Sanskrit (शाल, śāla, literally "house"), a name that suggests it for housing timber; other names in the Sanskrit language are ashvakarna, chiraparna and sarja, among many others.[4]

The sal tree is often confused with the ashoka tree (Saraca indica) in the ancient literature of the Indian Subcontinent.

In Buddhist tradition, it is said that Queen Māyā of Sakya gave birth to Gautama Buddha under a sal tree or an asoka tree in a garden in Lumbini, in south Nepal, while grasping its branch. When this event took place, Queen Māyā was en route to birth him in his grandfather's kingdom. It is also said that four pairs of sal trees growing around the Buddha's bed suddenly turned white when he died.

There is a standard decorative element of Hindu Indian sculpture which originated in a yakshi grasping the branch of a flowering tree while setting her foot against its roots.[5] This decorative sculptural element was integrated into Indian temple architecture as salabhanjika or "sal tree maiden", although it is not clear either whether it is a sal tree or an asoka tree.[6]

In Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, one can find typical Nepali pagoda temple architectures with very rich wooden carvings, and most of the temples, such as Nyatapol Temple (Nyatapola), are made of bricks and sal tree wood.
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Sal tree resin, ṛla in Sanskrit, is used as an astringent in Ayurvedic medicine.[7] It is also burned as incense in Hindu ceremonies, and sal seeds and fruit are a source of lamp oil and vegetable fat.

Sal Tree( or Sala Tree, shala Tree)
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Sala tree's flower.. beautiful, sweet scented flower
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Sala fruits
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Asoka Tree(or Ashoka Tree....sorrowless tree)..In Hinduism, Saraca Indica is a Sacred Tree

In Hinduism the ashoka is considered a sacred tree. Not counting a multitude of local traditions connected to it, the ashoka tree is worshipped in Chaitra, the first month of the Hindu Calendar. It is also associated with Kamadeva, the Hindu god of Love, who included an Ashoka blossom among the five flowers in his quiver. Hence, the ashoka tree is often mentioned in classical Indian religious and amorous poetry, having at least 16 different names in Sanskrit referring to the tree or its flowers.
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Banyan Tree..Indian national tree
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********** :anjali:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby daverupa » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:47 pm

That dog is doing some interesting veneration to that Banyan...

:clap:
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi tree)

Postby yawares » Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:55 pm

Dear Members,

There were 4 Buddhas who attained enlightenment sitting under the beautiful Naga trees: Mangala, Sumana, Revata and Sobhita. :anjali: :heart:

Naga Tree
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color change leaves
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Naga Tree in bloom..sweet smell flowers!
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:candle: Naga tree (Mesua Ferrea Lin) :candle:
[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia][/b]

Naga Tree {Mesua ferrea (Ceylon ironwood, Indian rose chestnut, or Cobra's saffron)}, [/color]is a species in the family Calophyllaceae. This slow-growing tree is named after the heaviness and hardness of its timber. It is widely cultivated as an ornamental due to its graceful shape, grayish-green foliage with a beautiful pink to red flush of drooping young leaves, and large, fragrant white flowers. It is native to wet, tropical parts of Sri Lanka, India, southern Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Indochina, the Philippines, Malaysia and Sumatra, where it grows in evergreen forests, especially in river valleys. In the eastern Himalayas and Western Ghats in India it grows up to altitudes of 1500 meters, while in Sri Lanka up to 1000 meters.

Description

The tree can grow over 30 meters tall, often buttressed at the base with a trunk up to 2 meters in diameter. The bark of younger trees has an ash grey color with flaky peelings, while of old trees the bark is dark ash-grey with a red-brown blaze. It has simple, opposite, narrow, oblong to lanceolate, blue-grey to dark green leaves that are 7–15 cm long and 1.5–3.5 cm wide, with a whitish underside. The emerging young leaves are red to yellowish pink and drooping. The branches are slender, terete and glabrous. The bisexual flowers are 4–7.5 cm in diameter, with four white petals and a center of numerous orange yellow stamens. The fruit is an ovoid to globose capsule with 1 to 2 seeds. [2]

[edit] History of the tree in Sri Lanka

In the dry zone areas of Sri Lanka—where ironwood trees normally do not grow wild, large, old ironwood trees can be seen around the remains of ancient Buddhist monasteries on rocky hills around Dambulla such as Na Uyana Aranya, Namal Uyana, Na-golla Aranya, Pidurangala near Sigiriya, Kaludiya Pokuna near Kandalama, and Ritigala. They are probably the descendants of trees planted as ornamentals in the monasteries in ancient times during the Anuradhapura period. Older trees form suckers or shoots from the base of the trunk, which become new trees when the old trunk falls down; therefore the bases and roots of some ironwood trees in these sites might be very old.[3]

[edit] Uses

As the English name indicates, the wood of this tree is very heavy, hard and strong. The density is 940 to 1,195 kg/m3 (59 to 75 lb/ft3) at 15% moisture content. The colour is deep dark red. It is hard to saw and is mainly used for railroad ties and heavy structural timber. [4] In Sri Lanka the pillars of the 14th century Embekke Shrine near Kandy are made of iron tree wood.[5]

The flowers, leaves, seeds and roots have medicinal properties and are used as herbal medicines in India, Malaysia, etc.

***********
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Significant Buddhist trees(not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:25 pm

Dear David/Members,

Have I told you lately that Anomadassi Buddha attained enlightenment sitting under the beautiful Ajjuna(Arjuna) tree?? Well dear dhamma-friends..I'm telling you now :anjali:

:heart: Ajjuna tree (Termina Arjuna) with fruits :heart:
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Ajjuna Tree with flowers :heart:
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Ajjuna Tree bark :heart:
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[From Wikipedia]
Habitat:

This ayurvedic herb is especially seen in Himalayan forests, Bengal, Bihar and Madhya Pradesh of India. It is commonly found in dry hill areas in the form of rows of several plants by the side of water bodies - rivers, streams and ravines. It is also planted in many parts of India for shade and for ornamental purposes. It thrives best on loose moist, fertile alluvial loams and light deep sandy soils, often overlying more or less impervious rock. The soil should have ample water supplies but should normally be well-drained. The soil under this tree becomes rich in calcium as the leaves are rich in this element.

The Plant:
This tree is about 60-80 feet in height. The tree of Arjuna is large, evergreen with a spreading crown and drooping branches.

Bark Of Terminalia arjuna:
It is simple, grey and smooth on external surface. The bark is thick, soft and of red color from inside.

The Leaves:
Leaves are like that of Guava leaves - oblong, 4-6 inch long and 2-3 inch wide, subopposite, glabrous and often inequilateral. There are two glands near the base of the petiole. The margin is crenulate with apex at obtuse or subacute angle. The base is rounded or cordate. Petioles run for 0.5 to 1.3 cm.

Flowers:
White or yellowish flowers are found in groups. Flowering occurs in summer and fruits appear in winter or spring season.

Fruits:
The fruits are 1-1.5 inch in diameter and with 5-7 longitudinal lobes. These are glabrous with five to seven wings, woody and fibrous. Fruit is drupe and is often notched near the top, marked with oblique upward curving striations.

Terminalia Arjuna - This ayurvedic herb is cardio-protective, cardiac tonic and cardiac stimulant, anti-hypertensive, anti-ischemic. See the herb pictures of this medicinal herb. The pictures of various medicinal parts as well as whole herb pictures and description of this medicinal plant is presented.
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*********** :anjali:
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Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Fri Feb 22, 2013 2:16 pm

The Kondanna Buddha's Salakalyan tree (Oroxylum Indicum)
Dear Members,

I tried so hard to search for this Salakalyan tree(Oroxylum Indicum) a native tree of India, held sacred by the Buddhists, who believe that Kondanna Buddha received enlightenment under this tree. I searched 'Salakayan tree'..found nothing! Search for 'Oroxylum Indicum', yes..yes!

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As medicine
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Salakalyan tree (Oroxylum Indicum)
[From Wikipedia and Toptropical]


Known as Broken Bones Plant, Indian Trumpet Flower, Midnight Horror
Origin: India and Southern China

The tree is often grown as an ornamental for its strange appearance. The long, podded fruits hang down from bear branches, looking like dangling sickles or swords in the night. The tree is also a night-bloomer and is pollinized naturally by bats. Additionally, after the large leaf stalks wither, they fall off the tree and collect near the base of the trunk, appearing to look like a pile of broken limb bones.

Oroxylum indicum is native to the Indian subcontinent, in the Himalayan foothills with a part extending to Bhutan and southern China, in Indo-China and the Malesia ecozone.

It is visible in the forest biome of Manas National Park in Assam, India. It is found, raised and planted in large number in the forest areas of the Banswara district in the state of Rajasthan in India.

It is also reported from Sri Lanka (Ceylon).[5]

Indian trumpet tree or broken bones plant is a key constituent of various Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyavanprash, Dashmoola and other tonics. It is an evergreen tree that grows to a height of 65-75 feet. It bears large trifoliate leaves with three ovate leaflets. It bears purple flowers that grow in inflorescence bloom at night. Therefore, they are pollinated by bats. It has elongated fruits that hang from the branches. The fruits bear many round and papery winged seeds. The plant is a native of India and China but also grows in Bhutan and Philippines also.

Part used: Seeds and root bark

Chemical composition: Chrysie, baicalein, oils and flavonoids

Medical benefits: Root bark is an astringent. It is used as a tonic. It also has anti-rheumatic properties and provides relief from pain and inflammation. Its bark is used to treat sore throat, cough, asthma, lung problems, bronchitis, diarrhea, and dysentery. It improves appetite and reduces fever. Externally, a paste of the roots is used to heal wounds. Gargling with decoction made from the plant reduces mouth sores. The leaves are also beneficial. Decoction made from the leaves improves the appetite and reduces pain. Hot fomentation of the leaves can give relief from fever, and reduce swelling in joints. Lab studies have indicated that extract of the seeds is antiseptic and antibacterial. It reduces cough, wheezing, and inflammation in joints. It can decrease tumor cells and is helpful in cancer.

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I have 'orange trumpet vine' medium shrub in my garden with same kind of bone-pods..attract Humming birds/butterflies..very pretty indeed/easy to grow(perennial).
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If you can search 'Salakalyan Tree' and find information/pictures..please let me know! :thanks:
yawares/tidathep/tep :heart: :anjali:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby manas » Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:16 am

"I thought: 'I recall once, when my father the Sakyan was working, and I was sitting in the cool shade of a rose-apple tree, then — quite secluded from sensuality, secluded from unskillful mental qualities — I entered & remained in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from seclusion, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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:anjali:
Primum non nocere: "first, do no harm."
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Mon Feb 25, 2013 1:56 pm

Dear Manas,

Thank you very much, very pretty picture indeed. We have rose-apple in Thailand too..we call them 'Jambu',
Thai people love to plant them in the garden...they taste so good!

yawares :heart:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:49 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, the Paduma Buddha and Narada Buddha were sitting under the beautiful Maha Sona trees when he became enlightened.

I searched yahoo for Sona Tree, India and found 2 Sona trees..Sona Chura and Sona Champa. Both trees are so very beautiful. 'Sona' means gold/golden.

Sona Chura Tree
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The streets of Dwarka, New Delhi are now bright shinning with yellow flowers of Sona chura trees lined across the streets. The bright yellow colors stay only for few day before giving way to green leaves and truly a treat for the eyes.

The streets of Dwarka, New Delhi
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Common name: Amaltas, Golden shower tree, Indian Laburnum • Hindi: अमलतास Amaltas • Manipuri: চহুঈ Chahui • Tamil: கொன்றை Konrai • Malayalam: Vishu konnai • Marathi: बहावा Bahava • Mizo: Ngaingaw • Bengali: সোনালী Sonali, Bandarlati, Amultas • Urdu: املتاس Amaltas

This native of India, is one of the most beautiful of all tropical trees when it sheds its leaves and bursts into a mass of long, grape-bunches like yellow gold flowers. A tropical ornamental tree with a trunk consisting of hard reddish wood, growing up to 40 feet tall. The wood is hard and heavy; it is used for cabinet, inlay work, etc. It has showy racemes, up to 2" long, with bright, yellow, fragrant flowers. These flowers are attractive to bees and butterflies. The fruits are dark-brown cylindrical pods, also 2' long, which also hold the flattish, brown seeds (up to 100 in one pod) These seeds are in cells, each containing a single seed. A postal stamp was issued by the Indian Postal Department to commemorate this tree.

Medicinal uses: The sweet blackish pulp of the seedpod is used as a mild laxative.

Note: Sona Chura Tree is THAILAND NATIONAL TREE...we call it "KOON TREE/GOLDEN SHOWER FLOWER"

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Sona Champa Tree, Sacred Flower of India
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Sona means gold or golden. It also means beautiful. we believe the word sona cannot be easily described - it must be experienced! In India, there is a tale about the sona champa, a delicate, golden flower that possesses an ethereal fragrance once prized by the people of India. The sona champa tree has glossy, green leaves and can grow as tall as 100 feet in a pyramidal shape. Legend has it that when the tree is in full bloom, covered with fragrant, golden blossoms, a celestial god and goddess descend to dance around it, enjoying the rare and exquisite beauty and the divine fragrance. This heavenly splendor is the true experience of the word Sona!
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Note: In Thailand we love to give Sona-Champa flowers and Jasmine flowers put together as lei/garland to the Buddha statues at our houses or at temples.

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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby James the Giant » Mon Feb 25, 2013 3:14 pm

Yawares, this is an excellent topic, thank you so much!
I have often wondered what the other past buddhas trees looked like. :anjali:
Then,
saturated with joy,
you will put an end to suffering and stress.
SN 9.11
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby Mr Man » Mon Feb 25, 2013 3:47 pm

This blog post may be of interest: "A Handful Of Leaves" from Ven. Dhammika's "dhamma musings " blog.

http://sdhammika.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/a-handful-of-leaves.html
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby Mr Man » Mon Feb 25, 2013 3:58 pm

Ayutthaya Thailand

Tree.jpg
Tree.jpg (266.71 KiB) Viewed 7359 times
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:15 pm

James the Giant wrote:Yawares, this is an excellent topic, thank you so much!
I have often wondered what the other past buddhas trees looked like. :anjali:
[b]Dear James the Giant,

I should be the one who thank you...your comment encourages me to keep on doing research on THE PAST BUDDHAS TREES. :heart:

yawares :anjali:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Tue Feb 26, 2013 2:33 pm

Mr Man wrote:This blog post may be of interest: "A Handful Of Leaves" from Ven. Dhammika's "dhamma musings " blog.

http://sdhammika.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/a-handful-of-leaves.html

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Dear Mr Man,

Thank you very much for the link..The Simsapa tree reminds me of the great love story of Kamanita/Vasitti that I posted last year. Please let me share your SIMSAPA TREE link with all members.

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Simsapa tree
[ by Shravasti Dhammika at 4:24 PM Tuesday, February 19, 2013]


A Handful Of Leaves

On one occasion the Lord was staying at Kosambi in a grove of simsapa trees. Then he took a handful of simsapa leaves and said to the monks; “What do you think? Which is the more numerous, this handful of leaves or those in this grove?” “Lord, the leaves in your hand are few but the leaves in this simsapa grove are many.” “So too, monks, those things I know directly but have not taught you are many, while the things I have taught you are few in comparison. Any why have I not taught you those many things? Because they are not connected with the goal, not fundamental to the holy life, they do not conduce to the good, to turning away, to fading, to calming, to higher knowledge or to Nirvana. And what have I taught? The Four Noble Truths. And why have I taught this? Because it is connected with the goal, fundamental to the holy life, conducive to the good, to turning away, to fading, calming, higher knowledge and to Nirvana.” (S.V,437-8)

This sutta tells us that enlightenment makes available to those who attain it vistas of knowledge that we can only imagine. It also underlines the Buddha’s pragmatism, that his principle concern was to free us from dukkha, and by implication, that it should be our main concern too. But the sutta might also raise curiosity in some people at least about the simpapa tree and leaves. For your information simpapa is Indian Rosewood, (Dalbergia sissoo) and here is a picture of its leaves

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The Simsapa tree
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Simsapa tree, India
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Dalbergia sissoo(Rosewood Tree)..flowers
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Seed Pods.
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Dalbergia sissoo (or Indian Rosewood) (), is a deciduous rosewood tree, also known as sisu, sheesham, tahli/Tali/ , or Irugudujava. It is native to the Indian Subcontinent and Southern Iran. In Persian, it is called Jag. It is the state tree of Punjab state (India) and the provincial tree of Punjab province (Pakistan). It is primarily found growing along river banks below elevation, but can range naturally up to . The temperature in its native range averages , but varies from just below freezing to nearly . It can withstand average annual rainfall up to and droughts of 3 4 months. Soils range from pure sand and gravel to rich alluvium of river banks; shisham can grow in slightly saline soils. Seedlings are intolerant of shade.

Second to teak wood, it is the most important cultivated timber tree of the Bihar, which is the largest producer of shisham timber in both India and Pakistan. In the Bihar, the tree is planted on roadsides, along canals and as a common shade tree for tea plantations. It is also commonly planted in the southern Indian cities as a street tree.

"Indian rosewood" is a medium to large deciduous tree with a light crown which reproduces by seeds and suckers. It can grow up to a maximum of 82 feet in height with a spread from about 15 to 50 feet, but it is usually smaller.

NOTE:
The Simsapa tree (Pali: siṃsapā) is mentioned in ancient Buddhist
discourses traditionally believed to have been delivered 2,500 years
ago. The tree has been identified as either Dalbergia sissoo,[1] a
rosewood tree common to India and southeast Asia, or Amherstia
nobilis, another South Asian tree, of the family Caesalpiniaceae.

Amherstia nobilis

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Buddhist scriptural references

In Buddhism's Pali Canon,[2] there is a discourse entitled, "The
Simsapa Grove" (SN 56.31). This discourse is described as having been
delivered by the Buddha to monks while dwelling beneath a simsapa
grove in the city of Kosambi. In this discourse, the Buddha compares a
few simsapa leaves in his hand with the number of simsapa leaves
overhead in the grove to illustrate what he teaches (in particular,
the Four Noble Truths) and what he does not teach (things unrelated to
the holy life).[3]

Elsewhere in the Pali Canon, samsapa groves are mentioned in the
"Payasi Sutta" (DN 23)[4] and in the "Hatthaka Discourse" (AN 3.34).[5][6]

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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Fri Mar 01, 2013 2:20 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Padumuttara Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Salala tree (Pinus Longiflis) when he became enlightened.
"

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Salala Tree (Pinus Longiflis/longifolia)
[Henriette's Herbal Homepage]


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blue pine pinus longifolia
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Long-leaved, evergreen Indian Pine, native to Himalaya Mountains. The seeds are eaten in India and are of some importance as food in times of scarcity.

*************
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Tue Mar 05, 2013 1:24 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Phussa Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Amalaka tree (Phyllanthus Emblica) when he became enlightened.

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Amalaka tree (Phyllanthus Emblica)
[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

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also known as indian gooseberry juice amalaka juice
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Phyllanthus emblica (syn. Emblica officinalis), the Indian gooseberry, or aamla from Sanskrit amalika, is a deciduous tree of the family Phyllanthaceae. It is known for its edible fruit of the same name.

The tree is small to medium in size, reaching 8 to 18 m in height, with a crooked trunk and spreading branches. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10–20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves are simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves. The flowers are greenish-yellow. The fruit is nearly spherical, light greenish yellow, quite smooth and hard on appearance, with six vertical stripes or furrows.

Ripening in autumn, the berries are harvested by hand after climbing to upper branches bearing the fruits. The taste of Indian gooseberry is sour, bitter and astringent, and it is quite fibrous. In India, it is common to eat gooseberries steeped in salt water and turmeric to make the sour fruits palatable[citation needed]. It is also used to straighten hair.

Cultural and religious significance

In the Sanskrit Buddhist tradition half an amalaka fruit was the final gift to the Buddhist sangha by the great Indian emperor Asoka. This is illustrated in the Asokavadana in the following verses: "A great donor, the lord of men, the eminent Maurya Asoka, has gone from being lord of Jambudvipa [India] to being lord of half a myrobalan." (Strong, 1983, P.99)[16] This deed became so famous that a stupa was created to mark place of the event in modern day Patna and was known as the Amalaka stupa.

The tree is considered sacred by Hindus as the god Vishnu is believed to dwell here. The tree is worshipped on Amalaka Ekadashi.

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[edit] Medicinal use

In traditional Indian medicine, dried and fresh fruits of the plant are used. All parts of the plant are used in various Ayurvedic/Unani medicine (Jawarish amla) herbal preparations, including the fruit, seed, leaves, root, bark and flowers.[17] According to Ayurveda, aamla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas).[17] Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the postdigestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura), and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita).[12]

According to Ayurveda, aamla balances all three doshas. While aamla is unusual in that it contains five out of the six tastes recognized by Ayurved, it is most important to recognize the effects of the "virya", or potency, and "vipaka", or post-digestive effect. Considered in this light, aamla is particularly helpful in reducing pitta due to its cooling energy.[17] and balances both Pitta and vata by virtue of its sweet taste. The kapha is balanced primarily due to its drying action. It may be used as a rasayana (rejuvenative) to promote longevity, and traditionally to enhance digestion (dipanapachana), treat constipation (anuloma), reduce fever (jvaraghna), purify the blood (raktaprasadana), reduce cough (kasahara), alleviate asthma (svasahara), strengthen the heart (hrdaya), benefit the eyes (chakshushya), stimulate hair growth (romasanjana), enliven the body (jivaniya), and enhance intellect (medhya).[17]
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Culinary use

Particularly in South India, the fruit is pickled with salt, oil, and spices. Aamla is eaten raw or cooked into various dishes. In Andhra Pradesh, tender varieties are used to prepare dal (a lentil preparation), and amle ka murabbah, a sweet dish indigenous to the northern part of India (wherein the berries are soaked in sugar syrup for a long time till they are imparted the sweet flavor); it is traditionally consumed after meals.

Note: These fruit pickled are quite popular in Thailand, I loved loved to eat them when I was in Thailand...so yummy. May be that's why I'm so strong/healthy.
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[edit] Other uses

Popularly used in inks, shampoos and hair oils, the high tannin content of Indian gooseberry fruit serves as a mordant for fixing dyes in fabrics.[17] Amla shampoos and hair oil are traditionally believed to nourish the hair and scalp and prevent premature grey hair

*************
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Sat Mar 09, 2013 3:00 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sumedha Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha Nipa tree when he became enlightened.

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Maha-Nipa tree (Nauclea Cadamba)
[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]


Synonyms: Neolamarckia cadamba

Cadamba Flower
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Cadamba fruits/flowers/leaves
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Tree in Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
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Nauclea cadamba, commonly called Kadam (Kannada: ಕದಂಬ), (Bengali: কদম/কদম্ব),(Oriya: କଦମ୍ବ) (Tamil: கடம்பு) is an evergreen, tropical tree native to South and Southeast Asia. The genus name "Lamarckia" is derived from the name of French naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck.

A fully mature Kadam tree can reach up to 45m in height. It is a large tree with a broad crown and straight cylindrical bole. It is quick growing, with broad spreading branches and grows rapidly in the first 6-8 years. The trunk has a diameter of 100-160 cm, but typically less than that. Leaves are 13-32 cm long. Flowering usually begins when the tree is 4–5 years old. Kadam flowers are sweetly fragrant, red to orange in colour, occurring in dense, globular heads of approximately 5.5 cm diameter. The fruit of N. cadamba occur in small, fleshy capsules packed closely together to form a fleshy yellow-orange infructescence containing approximately 8000 seeds. On maturing, the fruit splits apart, releasing the seeds, which are then dispersed by wind or rain.

Native to the following areas:

Indian subcontinent: India (n. & w.); Bangladesh; Nepal; Sri Lanka
Southeast Asia: Cambodia; Laos; Myanmar; Thailand; Vietnam, Indonesia; Malaysia; Papua New Guinea
Southern China

[edit] Uses

The fruit and inflorescences are reportedly edible to humans. The fresh leaves are fed to cattle. The fragrant orange flowers attract pollinators. Its sapwood is white with a light yellow tinge becoming creamy yellow on exposure and is not clearly differentiated from the heartwood.

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Kadamba is stated to be one of the most frequently planted trees in the tropics. A yellow dye is obtained from the root bark. Kadamba flowers are an important raw material in the production of ‘attar’, which is Indian perfume with sandalwood (Santalum spp.) base in which one of the essences is absorbed through hydro-distillation. The flowers exhibit slight anti-implantation activity in test animals. Kadamba extracts exhibit nematicidal effects on Meloidogyne incognita. The dried bark is used to relieve fever and as a tonic. An extract of the leaves serves as a mouth gargle.

The tree is grown along avenues, roadsides and villages for shade. Kadamba are suitable for reforestation programs. It sheds large amounts of leaf and non-leaf litter which on decomposition improves some physical and chemical properties of soil under its canopy. This reflects an increase in the level of soil organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, available plant nutrients and exchangeable bases.

Kadamba tree leaves are also used for treating diabetes. A drug made from this tree is patented.

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[edit] Cultural significance

Kadamba tree at the entrance to the Meenakshi temple
The word Kadamba lends its name to the Kadamba Dynasty which ruled from Banavasi in what is now the state of Karnataka from 345 CE to 525 CE, as per Talagunda inscription of c.450 CE.The Kadamba tree was considered a holy tree by the Kadamba dynasty.

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[edit] Religious significance

Karam-Kadamba is a popular harvest festival, celebrated on the eleventh Moon day of the month Bhaadra. A twig of the tree is brought and worshipped in the courtyard of the house. Later in the day, young ears of grain are distributed among friends and relatives. This festive custom has been adopted by Tulu people. Onam (Kerala) and Huttari (Kodagu) are regional variants of this festival. Kadambotsava ("The festival of Kadamba") is also the festival that is celebrated every year by the Government of Karnataka in honor of the Kadamba kingdom, the first ruling Kingdom of Karnataka, at Banavasi, as it was here that the Kadamba kings organised the spring festival every year.

The Kadamba tree is also associated with a tree deity called Kadambariyamman. The Kadamba tree, which is considered the ‘sthalavruksham’ (Tree of the place) of the city that is otherwise known as ‘Kadambavanam’ (Kadamba forest) and is present in Meenakshi Temple. A withered relic of the Kadamba tree is also preserved there.

It claimed that the 27 Stars (constellations) constituting 12 Houses (Rasis) and 9 Planets are specifically represented precisely by 27 trees —one for each star. The Kadamba tree is said to represent Shatabhisha (Western star name -γ Aquarii).

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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Wed Mar 13, 2013 1:36 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sujata Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-Velu Tree (Bambusa Arundinacea) when he became enlightened.

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:candle: Maha-Velu Tree (Bambusa Arundinacea) :candle:
[From Wikipedia/Exoticplant/Motherherbs]

Bambusa flowers
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This is a true giant, growing up to 40 m high. They have numerous branches at a node and one or two much larger than the rest. It has many stems tufted on a stout root stock. New shoots start growing slowly, but soon grow approximately 30 cm per day. 75 cm in one day has been recorded in Sri Lanka.

Bambusa arundinacea, also known as spiny, thorny or Indian bamboo, is thorny and densely tufted with curving branches and shining stalks that reach up to 30m tall and 18cm wide. It is native to the forests of India, Thailand and southern China, though it is also planted in Indonesia, Nepal, the Philippines and Vietnam. Spiny bamboo thrives in moderately to very humid tropical climates and will grow on rich or poor soils, though it prefers an acidic, moist environment. This type of bamboo is commonly used for building materials, furniture, pulp and paper.

The bamboo shoot in its fermented state forms an important ingredient in cuisines across the Himalayas. In Assam, India, for example, it is called khorisa. In Nepal, a delicacy popular across ethnic boundaries consists of bamboo shoots fermented with turmeric and oil, and cooked with potatoes into a dish that usually accompanies rice (alu tama in Nepali).

In Ayurveda, the Indian system of traditional medicine, the silicious concretion found in the culms of the bamboo stem is called banslochan. It is known as tabashir or tawashir in unani-tibb the Indo-Persian system of medicine. In English, it is called "bamboo manna". This concretion is said to be a tonic for the respiratory diseases.[citation needed] It was earlier obtained from Melocanna bambusoides and is very hard to get. In most Indian literature, Bambusa arundinacea is described as the source of bamboo manna.

Bamboo has strong influence on spinal complains and hormonal disorders. We expect bamboo to be one of the major "women's remedies". The bamboo shoot is itself a "plant embryo" and this is a powerful signature that suggests the use of bamboo in childbirth and the time after.

Bambusa Arundinacea Extract
Action :
Silicates: 1. It functions as a cross-linking agent, providing strength, flexibility and resilience to collagen and elastin connective tissues. 2. It is plays a part in the integrity of the bones, arterial walls, skin, teeth, gums, hair and nails and has been used to alleviate eczema and psoriasis. 3. It may be useful in preventing osteoporosis and in strengthening the musculoskeletal system, preventing injuries and speeding the healing of fractures. 4. It stimulates chrondroblast or cartilage-forming cells to deposit proteins and other structural materials on the matrix. 5. It helps in the building process of fiber-forming cells important to the creation of collagen. 6. It is very useful in creation of the body’s structural matrix for forming and repairing connective tissue.

Curing Diseases : 1. It is used in diarrhoea, dyspepsia, flatulence and worm problems.
2. It is used in fever, inflammations, ulcers and wounds.
3. It is also used in vomiting, hyperdipsia and burning sensation.
4. It helps to cure cough, bronchitis, asthma, asthmatic bronchitis and emphysema.
5. It is used in strangury, syphilis, ophthalmia and haemorrhages.

Research Information : Extract of Bambusa arundinacea leaves shows significant anti-inflammatory as well as antiulcer effect against carrageenin-induced as well as immunologically induced paw oedema. It is very useful in long-term chronic inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis along with peptic ulcers. (Ref. Muniappan, M and Sundararaj, T, Antiinflammatory and antiulcer activities of Bambusa arundinacea. J. Ethanopharmacology, 2003 Oct;88 (2-3): 161-167)

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:heart: I love love young bamboo-shoot-soup/bake bamboo-sweetrice :heart:
yawares/tidathep :jumping:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Tue Mar 19, 2013 1:26 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Atthadassi Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-Campaka Tree (Michelia Champaka) when he became enlightened.

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Campaka tree (Michelia Champaka)
Synonym = Magnolia champaca
[From Wikipedia/World English Dictionary]


Magnolia champaca is a large evergreen tree, native to India and the East Indies, the Indomalaya ecozone (consisting of South Asia, Southeast Asia and some parts of China). It is best known for its strongly fragrant yellow or white flowers. It is, however, primarily cultivated for its timber, and is also used in urban landscaping. Its aril-covered seeds are highly attractive to birds.

Michelia Champaca (Himalayan Magnolia) Used in perfumes
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Varieties

This species occurs in varying shades of cream to yellow-orange. In China, M. champaca var. pubinervia is documented. Magnolia × alba is a hybrid cultivar of M. champaca. In Thailand, there has been some purported man-made hybrids with other magnolia species including Magnolia liliifera and Magnolia coco.

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Etymology

The species epithet, champaca, comes from the Sanskrit word campaka (pronounced tʃaɱpaka). Common names in other languages include champaca, champak; Sonchaaphaa (सोन चाफ़ा) in the Marathi language; Chenbakam/Chenpakam (செண்பகம்) in Tamil; Chenbagam in Malayalam; shornochampa (golden champa), স্বর্ণচাঁপা in Bengali; champa, cempaka, sampenga and sampangi in Telugu; Sampige (ಸಂಪಿಗೆ) in Kannada;

Perfume

The flowers are used in Southeast Asia for several purposes. They are primarily used for worship at temples whether at home or out, and more generally worn in hair by girls and women as a means of beauty ornament as well as a natural perfume. Flowers are used to be floated in bowls of water to scent the room, as a fragrant decoration for bridal beds, and for garlands.

"Magnolia champaca however is more rare and has a strong perfume, and is not that commonly or plentifully used - for example in hair it is worn singly or as a small corsage but rarely as a whole garland, and for bridal beds it is most often jasmine and roses while for bowls of water to be placed around rooms usually other, more colourful for visual decoration and less strongly perfumed flowers are used."

The flower is sometimes commonly called the 'Joy perfume tree.' Many niche perfumers are now once again using Champaca Absolute as single note fragrances, notably Ormonde Jayne Perfumery launched in 2002 Champaca, Tom Ford Champaca Absolute and Comme des Garcons.
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NOTE: I think golden Campaka Tree and Sona Champaka tree are the same ...same tree/same flower
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I had a big creamy-white Campaka tree( 'Jumpee' in Thai) at my house in Bangkok :heart:
yawares/sirikanya :anjali: :heart:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Mon Mar 25, 2013 4:27 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sikhi Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Pundarika tree (Mangifera indica ) when he became enlightened.

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:heart: Sikhi Buddha:Pundarika Tree :heart:
[Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]


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Mangifera indica is a species of mango in the Anacardiaceae family. It is found in the wild in India and cultivated varieties have been introduced to other warm regions of the world. It is the largest fruit-tree in the world, capable of a height of one-hundred feet and an average circumference of twelve to fourteen feet, sometimes reaching twenty.

The species appears to have been domesticated about 4,000 years ago.[citation needed] The species was brought to East Asia around 400-500 BCE from India; next, in the 15th century to the Philippines; and then, in the 16th century to Africa and Brazil by the Portuguese. The species was described for science by Linnaeus in 1753.

Mango is the national fruit of India, Philippines and Pakistan. It finds mention in the songs of 4th century CE Sanskrit poet, Kalidasa, prior to it is believed to have been tasted by Alexander (3rd century BCE) and Chinese pilgrim, Hieun Tsang (7th century CE). Later in 16th century Mughal Emperor, Akbar planted 100,000 mango trees in Darbhanga, Bihar at a place now known as Lakhi Bagh.

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I love love Mango tree, beautiful plant with very sweet fruits..if I/Tep/Sirikanya chose to be ascetics, we would build pretty hermitage under a huge mango tree near a lake with a small Viking ship..Oh daydream again :heart:
yawares/tidathep :anjali:
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Re: Significant Buddhist trees (not Bodhi Tree)

Postby yawares » Mon Apr 01, 2013 1:35 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Vessabhu Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-sala tree (Shorea Robusta)when he became enlightened.

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Vessabhu: Maha-sala tree (Shorea Robusta)
[Wikipedia]

Shorea robusta, also known as śāl or shala tree, is a species of tree belonging to the Dipterocarpaceae family.

New leaves with flower buds
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This tree is native to the Indian Subcontinent, ranging south of the Himalaya, from Myanmar in the east to Nepal, India and Bangladesh. In India, it extends from Assam, Bengal, Odisha and Jharkhand west to the Shivalik Hills in Haryana, east of the Yamuna. The range also extends through the Eastern Ghats and to the eastern Vindhya and Satpura ranges of central India. It is often the dominant tree in the forests where it occurs. In Nepal, it is found mostly in the terai region from east to west, especially, in the Churia range (the Shivalik Hill Churia Range) in the subtropical climate zone. There are many protected areas, such as Chitwan National Park, Bardiya National Park Bardia National Park, Shukla Phat National Parks, etc., where there are dense forests of huge sal trees. It is also found in the lower belt of the hilly region and inner terai.

SAl tree is also known as Sakhua in the northern India including MP, Orrisa and Jharkhand.

Sal is moderate to slow growing, and can attain heights of 30 to 35 m and a trunk diameter of up to 2-2.5 m. The leaves are 10–25 cm long and 5–15 cm broad. In wetter areas, it is evergreen; in drier areas, it is dry-season deciduous, shedding most of the leaves in between February to April, leafing out again in April and May.

Uses

Sal is one of the most important sources of hardwood timber in India, with hard, coarse-grained wood that is light in colour when freshly cut, but becomes dark brown with exposure. The wood is resinous and durable, and is sought-after for construction, although not well suited to planing and polishing. The wood is specially suitable for constructing frames for doors and windows. The dry leaves of sal are a major source for the production of leaf plates and leaf bowls in northern and eastern India. The leaves are also used fresh to serve ready made paan (betelnut preparations) and small snacks such as boiled black grams, gol gappa, etc. The used leaves/plates are readily eaten by goats and cattle that roam the streets freely. The tree has therefore protected northern India from a flood of styrofoam and plastic plates that would have caused tremendous pollution. In South India, fresh plantain and banana leaves are used instead.

Sal tree resin, ṛla in Sanskrit, is used as an astringent in Ayurvedic medicine.[6] It is also burned as incense in Hindu ceremonies, and sal seeds and fruit are a source of lamp oil and vegetable fat.

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