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SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire - Dhamma Wheel

SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

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SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:09 pm

SN 47.37 PTS: S v 181 CDB ii 1658
Chanda Sutta: Desire
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


How mindfulness leads to freedom from desire — and beyond.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

At Savatthi. "Monks, there are these four establishings of mindfulness. Which four?

"There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — subduing greed & distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on the body in and of itself, any desire for the body is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on feelings in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — subduing greed & distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on feelings in & of themselves, any desire for feelings is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on the mind in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful — subduing greed & distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on the mind in and of itself, any desire for the mind is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — subduing greed & distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on mental qualities in & of themselves, any desire for mental qualities is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized."

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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:11 pm

SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta
Translated by John Ireland


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... passage-70

"These, bhikkhus, are the four foundations of mindfulness...

"While he is living practicing body-contemplation on the body, whatever desire there is with regard to the body is abandoned. By abandoning desire the deathless is realized.

"While he is living practicing feeling-contemplation on feelings... mind-contemplation on mind... mind-object contemplation on the objects of mind, whatever desire there is with regard to mind-objects is abandoned. By abandoning desire the deathless is realized."

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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:14 pm


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polarbear101
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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby polarbear101 » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:33 pm

I would imagine the reason for this is because satipatthana results in one seeing the basic pattern of anicca, dukkha, anatta of the body, feelings, mind, phenomena and thus dispassion and release from attachment to them. As a result, there is no you in connection with the body, feelings, mind, phenomena; when there is no you in connection with that there is no you to die when those things cease. This is my current understanding of deathlessness, i.e. the realization of anatta. Meditation such as satipatthana allows one to comprehend the full range of experience and see that it is just phenomena flowing on with no inherent identity in connection to it, i.e. identity is just another idea/mental fabrication and it too is anicca, dukkha, anatta.

:anjali:
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."

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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby Spiny Norman » Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:48 pm

"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby daverupa » Wed Feb 06, 2013 3:14 pm


santa100
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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby santa100 » Wed Feb 06, 2013 3:36 pm


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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby daverupa » Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:18 pm


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Sam Vara
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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby Sam Vara » Wed Feb 06, 2013 10:40 pm


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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby Spiny Norman » Thu Feb 07, 2013 10:47 am

Thanks Santa100 and Daverupa. Practically speaking, just focussing on one frame seems quite challenging off the cushion. ;)
"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
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Sam Vara
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Re: SN 47.37: Chanda Sutta — Desire

Postby Sam Vara » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:34 pm



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