Dhammavadaka

Post sayings and stories you find interesting or useful.

Dhammavadaka

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:28 am

Bhante Dhammika of Buddha Dhamma Mandala Society, Singapore, wrote a poem back in 1986 which has become pretty famous. Many around the internet have quoted it and some have mis-attributed it as being the "Dhammavadaka Sutra" :) Here is the poem:

Remember always that you are just a visitor here, a traveller passing through. Your stay here is but short and the moment of your departure unknown.

None can live without toil and a craft that provides your needs is a blessing indeed. But if you toil without rest, fatigue and weariness will overtake you and you will be denied the joy that comes from labour’s end.

Speak quietly and kindly and be not forward with either opinions or advice. If you talk much this will make you deaf to what others say, and you should know that there are few so wise that they cannot learn from others.

Be near when help is needed but far when praise and thanks are being offered. Take small account of might, wealth and fame for they soon pass and are forgotten. Instead, nurture love within you and strive to be a friend to all. Truly, compassion is a balm for many wounds. Treasure silence when you find it and while being mindful of your duties set time aside to be alone with yourself. Cast off pretence and self-deception and see yourself as you really are.

Despite all appearances, no one is really evil. They are led astray by ignorance. If you ponder this truth often you will offer more light rather that blame and condemnation.

You, no less all beings, have Buddha Nature within. Your essential mind is pure. Therefore, when defilements cause you to stumble and fall, let not remorse nor dark foreboding cast you down. Be of good cheer and with this understanding summons strength and walk on.

Faith is like a lamp and wisdom it is that makes the light burn bright. Carry this light always and in good time the darkness will yield and you will abide in the light.


http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Dhammavadaka
User avatar
David N. Snyder
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7963
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby pilgrim » Mon Oct 22, 2012 12:17 pm

Compare with "Desiderata" by American writer Max Ehrmann (1872–1945)

Go placidly amidst the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs; for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here.

And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its shams, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy
User avatar
pilgrim
 
Posts: 934
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:47 pm

Buddha's verses:
Image

Manopubbangama dhamma
manosettha manomaya
manasa ce padutthena
bhasati va karoti va
tato nam dukkhamanveti
cakkamva vahato padam.

All mental phenomena have mind as their forerunner; they have mind as their chief; they are mind-made. If one speaks or acts with an evil mind, 'dukkha'*follows him just as the wheel follows the hoof-print of the ox that draws the cart. :anjali:
-------------
Manopubbangama dhamma
manosettha manomaya
manasa ce pasannena
bhasati va karoti va
tato nam sukha manveti
chayava anapayini.

All mental phenomena have mind as their forerunner; they have mind as their chief; they are mind-made. If one speaks or acts with a pure mind, happiness (sukha)** follows him like a shadow that never leaves him. :anjali:

--------------------
This was the poem I learned in junior high :heart:
Row, row, row your boat,
gently down the stream,
until you hit the waterfall—
then you’ll start to scream.

Row, row, row your boat,
Gently down the stream.
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,
Life is but a dream.
:thinking:

yawares :heart:
Last edited by yawares on Wed Dec 05, 2012 3:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:28 pm

Hi you all,

Verse 54: The scent of flowers cannot go against the wind; nor the scent of sandalwood, nor of rhododendron (tagara), nor of jasmin (mallika)2; only the reputation of good people can go against the wind. The reputation of the virtuous ones (sappurisa) is wafted abroad in all directions.

Verse 55: There are the scents of sandalwood, rhododendron, lotus and jasmin (vassika)3; but the scent of virtue surpasses all scents.

Verse 56: The scents of rhododendron and of sandal wood are very faint; but the scent (reputation) of the virtuous is the strongest; it spreads even to the abodes of the deva.

I'm a new member :smile:
Tidathep
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby Viscid » Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:31 pm

Having something of yours mistaken for Buddhavacana must be the ultimate compliment.
"What holds attention determines action." - William James
User avatar
Viscid
 
Posts: 879
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Wed Oct 31, 2012 3:34 pm

Hi,

I love Buddha's verses, my mother always emails me almost everyday.

Verse 7: He who keeps his mind on pleasant objects, who is uncontrolled in his senses, immoderate in his food, and is lazy and lacking in energy, will certainly be overwhelmed by Mara,3 just as stormy winds uproot a weak tree.

Verse 8: He who keeps his mind on the impurities (of the body), who is well-controlled in his senses and is full of faith and energy, will certainly be not overwhelmed by Mara, just as stormy winds cannot shake a mountain of rock.

..........
Tidathep
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:50 pm

[Buddha's Udana by Thanissaro Bhikkhu]

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta's Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery. And on that occasion Ven. Sāriputta, Ven. Mahā Moggalāna, Ven. Mahā Kassapa, Ven. Mahā Kaccāyana, Ven. Mahā Koṭṭhita, Ven. Mahā Kappina, Ven. Mahā Cunda, Ven. Anuruddha, Ven. Revata, and Ven. Nanda[1] went to the Blessed One. The Blessed One saw them coming from afar and, on seeing them, addressed the monks, "Monks, those are brahmans who are coming. Monks, those are brahmans who are coming."

When this was said, a certain monk who was a brahman by birth said to the Blessed One, "To what extent, lord, is one a brahman? And which are the qualities that make one a brahman?"

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:
Image

Having banished evil qualities,[2]
those who go about ever mindful,
awakened, their fetters ended:
They, in the world,
are truly brahmans.

-------------
yawares :anjali:
Last edited by yawares on Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Fri Nov 02, 2012 1:14 pm

Hi you all,

Verse 9: He who is not free from taints of moral defilements (kilesas) and yet dons the yellow robe, who lacks restraint in his senses and (speaks not the) truth is unworthy of the yellow robe.

Verse 10: He who has discarded all moral defilements (kilesas), who is established in moral precepts, is endowed with restraint and (speaks the) truth is, indeed, worthy of the yellow robe.

..............
Tidathep :anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sat Nov 17, 2012 2:07 pm

Verse 3. He abused me, he ill-treated me, he got the better of me, he stole my belongings;"... the enmity of those harbouring such thoughts cannot be appeased.

Verse 4. He abused me, he ill-treated me, he got the better of me, he stole my belongings;"... the enmity of those not harbouring such thoughts can be appeased.

Verse 5. Hatred is, indeed, never appeased by hatred in this world. It is appeased only by loving-kindness. This is an ancient Law.

Verse 6. People, other than the wise, do not realize, "We in this world must all die," (and not realizing it continue their quarrels). The wise realize it and thereby their quarrels cease.
yawares :anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sun Nov 18, 2012 3:01 pm

Buddha's Lists:
Image

List no. 255
The Five Benefits of Walking Meditation:
1. Stamina for long journeys
2. Stamina for meditation practice
3. Good health
4. Assistance in digestion
5. Durable concentration
************
I still post DAVID's BOOK @ sariputtadhamma/JTN...and will do till its end.
yawares :anjali:
Last edited by yawares on Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Mon Nov 19, 2012 4:14 am

Thag 4.8. Rahula-theragatha (uttered by Venerable Rahula)

"In both ways consummate, I'm known as Rahula the Fortunate:
Because I'm the son of the Buddha, because I've the eye that sees Dhammas."


"Because my fermentations are ended, because I've no further becoming.
I'm deserving of offerings, a worthy one a three-knowledge man, with
sight of the Deathless."

"Those blinded by sensuality covered by the net, veiled by the veil of craving,
bound by the Kinsman of the heedless, are like fish in the mouth of a trap."

"Throwing that sensuality aside, cutting through Mara's bond,
pulling out craving, root and all, cooled am I, Unbound."


:anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sun Nov 25, 2012 1:20 pm

:candle: Buddha's List no. 297 :candle:
Five rewards of listening to the Dhamma:
1. One hears what one has not heard before
2. One clarifies what one has heard before
3. One gets rid of doubt
4. One‘s views are made straight
5. One‘s mind grows serene
(from Anguttara Nikaya 5.38)

yawares :anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Sun Nov 25, 2012 6:53 pm

Buddha's Verses:

Verse 11: They take untruth for truth; they take truth for untruth; such persons can never arrive at the truth, for they hold wrong views.

Verse 12: They take truth for truth; they take untruth for untruth; such persons arrive at the truth, for they hold right views.

Verse 13: Just as rain penetrates a badly-roofed house, so also, passion (raga) penetrates a mind not cultivated in Tranquillity and Insight Development (Samatha and Vipassana).

Verse 14: Just as rain cannot penetrate a well-roofed house, so also, passion (raga) cannot penetrate a mind well-cultivated in Tranquillity and Insight Development (Samatha and Vipassana).

Tidathep :anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sat Dec 01, 2012 4:11 am

List no. 369
Six qualities that make one incapable of hearing and practicing the Dhamma:
1. He is endowed with a [present] kamma obstruction
2. A defilement obstruction
3. A result-of-[past]-kamma obstruction
4. He lacks conviction
5. He has no desire [to listen]
6. He has dull discernment
-------
Buddha's verses:
15. Here he grieves, hereafter he grieves; the evil-doer grieves in both existences. He grieves and he suffers anguish when he sees the depravity of his own deeds.

16. Here he rejoices, hereafter he rejoices; one who performs meritorious deeds rejoices in both existences. He rejoices and greatly rejoices when he sees the purity of his own deeds.

**********
yawares :anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Wed Dec 05, 2012 3:39 am

Thera Nagasena:

"Even though the Blessed One has now passed away
and cannot be said to accept gifts and honours paid to him
yet deeds done in his name are of value and bear great fruit.
As a great and mighty wind that blew, even so the Blessed
One has blown over the world with his love, so soothing, so
gentle and so pure. Like men tormented by heat and fever
are soothed by a cool wind, so, too, beings tormented by the
heat of desire, hatred and delusion are pacified by the sublime
teaching of the Blessed One. Although, great king, the
Blessed One has entirely passed away, he has left behind
his doctrine, his discipline and his precious relics whose
value derives from his virtue, concentration, wisdom and
freedom. Beings afflicted by the sorrows of becoming can
still receive the benefits of these things, as those who have
fans can still make a breeze although the wind has subsided.
This was foreseen by the Blessed One when he said, `It
may be, ânanda, that some of you may think, "The word of
the master is ended; we have no teacher any more", but you
should not regard it so. The Dhamma that has been
preached by me and the rules that I have laid down, let
them be your teachers when I am gone'."[58. D. ii. 154.]

********
Tidathep :anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:57 pm

tidathep wrote:Thag 4.8. Rahula-theragatha (uttered by Venerable Rahula)

"In both ways consummate, I'm known as Rahula the Fortunate:
Because I'm the son of the Buddha, because I've the eye that sees Dhammas."


"Because my fermentations are ended, because I've no further becoming.
I'm deserving of offerings, a worthy one a three-knowledge man, with
sight of the Deathless."

"Those blinded by sensuality covered by the net, veiled by the veil of craving,
bound by the Kinsman of the heedless, are like fish in the mouth of a trap."

"Throwing that sensuality aside, cutting through Mara's bond,
pulling out craving, root and all, cooled am I, Unbound."


Image

:anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sun Dec 09, 2012 2:32 pm

Dear Members,
Vajrasattva Tibetan Buddha Tharlam Monastery Bodha Kathmandu Nepal
Image

Buddha' List no. 407
Seven good qualities of a Dhamma follower:

1. He has conviction, is convinced of the Tathagata's Awakening.
2. He feels shame at [the thought of engaging in] bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental
misconduct.
3. He feels concern for [the suffering that results from] bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct,
mental misconduct.
4. He has heard much, has retained what he has heard, has stored what he has heard
5. He keeps his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful mental qualities and taking on
skillful mental qualities.
6. He is mindful, highly meticulous, remembering and able to call to mind even things that were
done and said long ago.
7. He is discerning, endowed with discernment of arising and passing away — noble,
penetrating, leading to the right ending of suffering.

********
yawares :anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby yawares » Sun Dec 16, 2012 1:09 am

Dear David/Members,

I love this list very much :heart:

Buddha' List no. 395

The seven actions performed in the seven weeks after enlightenment by the Buddha in Bodh
Gaya:

1. Under the Bodhi Tree
During the first week after enlightenment, the Buddha sat under the bodhi tree experiencing the
happiness of freedom and peace. He was free from disturbing thoughts, calm and blissful.
Image

2. Gazing at the Tree
During the second week, in thanks and gratitude to the tree that had sheltered him during his
struggle for Buddhahood, the Buddha stood without moving his eyes as he meditated on the
bodhi tree. Following this example, it is the custom of Buddhists to pay respect to not only the
original bodhi tree, but also to the descendants of the bodhi tree that still thrive today.

3. The Golden Bridge
In the third week, the Buddha saw through his mind‘s eye that the devas in the heavens were not
sure whether he had attained enlightenment or not. To prove his enlightenment the Buddha
created a golden bridge in the air and walked up and down it for a whole week in a walking
meditation.

4. The Jewelled Chamber
In the fourth week, he created a beautiful jewelled chamber and sitting inside it meditated on
what was later known as the higher doctrine (Abhidhamma). His mind and body were so purified
that six coloured rays came out of his body — blue, yellow, red, white, orange and a mixture of
these five. Today these six colours make up the Buddhist flag. Each color represented one noble
quality of the Buddha: yellow for holiness, white for purity, blue for confidence, red for wisdom
and orange for desirelessness. The mixed color represented all these noble qualities.

5. Three Girls
During the fifth week, while meditating under a banyan tree, three most charming girls (or mind
states) came to disturb his meditation. They danced in a most seductive and charming manner
and did everything to tempt the Buddha to watch their dance. Yet he continued to meditate
unperturbed, and soon they tired and left him alone.

Image

6. The Mucalinda Tree
The Buddha then went and meditated at the foot of a mucalinda tree. It began to rain heavily and
a huge king cobra came out and coiled his body seven times around the Buddha to keep him
warm and placed his hood over the Buddha‘s head to protect him from the rain.

Image

7. The Rajayatana Tree
During the seventh week, the Buddha meditated under the rajayatana tree. On the fiftieth
morning, after seven weeks of fasting, two merchants came into his presence. They were called
Tapussa and Bhallika. They offered the Buddha rice cakes and honey to break his fast and the
Buddha told them some of what he had found in his enlightenment. These two merchants, by
taking refuge in the Buddha and his Dhamma became the first lay followers.
Image

**********
yawares :anjali:
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Re: Dhammavadaka

Postby tidathep » Sat Dec 22, 2012 2:41 pm

:candle: Ekavihariya Thera: The Lonely Forest Dweller :candle:
[translated from the Pali by Andrew Olendzki]

Prince Tissa(Vitasoka) was made Vice Regent when Ashoka was first consecrated
King. But within only a few years, inspired by the example of a forest-dwelling
monk he encountered while hunting, he renounced worldly life to live as a simple
Buddhist monk in the wilderness.

His monastic name translates as The Elder Who Lives Alone. The poem exudes the
romantic yearning for the solitude of nature felt by someone who grew up, no
doubt, in the court of the Maurya empire. The first five stanzas are said to
have been uttered to Ashoka while expressing his wish to become a monk, and the
last two verses were composed upon ordination. A final verse, not translated
here, attests to his eventual awakening.

It was quite a family. Ashoka's son (Mahinda) and daughter (Sanghamitta) were
the ones to formally bring the Dhamma to the island of Lanka, where Theravada
Buddhism flourished for two and a half millennia. The mountains named in the
last stanza actually refer to the ring of hills surrounding Vulture's Peak, but
since the previous stanza specifies the peak of a mountain, I think it is
appropriate to name the more well-known site.

:heart: If nobody is to be found,
In front of one or behind one,
That is exceedingly pleasant
For the lonely forest dweller.

So be it! I will go alone
To the forest, praised by Buddha;
For the self-resolute bhikkhu,
Dwelling alone, it is pleasant.

Pleasing, and joyful to sages,
Haunted by rutting elephants,
Seeking my goal alone, quickly
Will I go to the wild forest.

In the well-flowered Cool Garden,
In a soothing mountain grotto,
Having anointed all my limbs,
I will walk back and forth, alone.

When indeed shall I come to dwell
All alone, without companion
In the great forest, so pleasing!
My task accomplished, without taint?

While the gentle breezes flutter,
Soothing and laden with fragrance,
I'll burst asunder ignorance
While seated on the mountain top.

In a grove covered with flowers,
Or maybe on a cool hillside,
Gladdened by the joy of release,
I'll be content on Vultures Peak. :heart:

******
Love this Udana :heart:
tidathep/yawares :anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 7:11 pm

Re: Congratulations David N Snyder!

Postby yawares » Wed Dec 26, 2012 10:15 pm

----------------
Dear David,

:heart: Happy Birthday again and Happy New Super Cool LOTUS :heart: very very beautiful car!!...I wish you/your lovely wife/son/daughter enjoy this long Holidays...and please please don't forget to answer the question about LIST # 462.............if you want to answer here is fine with me...I can copy/post it at SD ....thank you very much.

yawares :anjali: :heart:
--------
Last edited by yawares on Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
yawares
 
Posts: 1532
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:23 pm

Next

Return to Dhammic Stories

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests