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American (Western) Folk Buddhism - Dhamma Wheel

American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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mikenz66
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American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:45 pm


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Goofaholix
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:50 pm


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mikenz66
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Jun 06, 2012 10:04 pm


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Hanzze
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Hanzze » Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:56 am

I guess that what we are doing here, we can call Western "Folk" Buddhism. *smile* Guess what makes it mostly alive in Western world.
Just that! *smile*


BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Nate sante baram sokham _()_

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Ben
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Ben » Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:14 am

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

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Goofaholix
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:24 am


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mikenz66
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:35 am

Hi Goofaholix,

Thanks for the extensive reply. I think you're right about the "self help" thing. And, of course, you're right that one of the overarching themes is that "Folk Buddhism" isn't actually a bad thing if it heads people in roughly the right direction.

:anjali:
Mike

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Sam Vara
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Sam Vara » Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:51 am

Many thanks for a very interesting set of articles which I have book-marked for later study.

I was initially puzzled as to how we are to define the "essence" in "essential Buddhism". It turns out that what Bhante is advocating is (essentially!) a healthy bit of philosophical realism, which cheered me up no end. Essential Buddhism is that which is sustained by those adepts who come into contact with the reality of what the teaching points to.

I find this as gratifying as it is elegant.

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Dan74
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Dan74 » Thu Jun 07, 2012 10:21 am

_/|\_

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Mr Man
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Mr Man » Thu Jun 07, 2012 10:31 am

Would an aspect of western folk buddhism be that there "is" an essence beyond folk Buddhism that can be found when all the layers are striped away (A Buddhist holy grail of pure and definitive Buddha Vacana)?
Last edited by Mr Man on Thu Jun 07, 2012 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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kirk5a
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby kirk5a » Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:28 pm

"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230

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daverupa
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby daverupa » Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:57 pm


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Viscid
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Viscid » Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:41 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

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mikenz66
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Jun 07, 2012 8:05 pm


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Goofaholix
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:24 pm

I see in the last few installments he has moved on to the topic of gender equality.

Again no surprises from what I can tell Western Folk Buddhism has much more in common with Essential Buddhism than the inequality common in Asian Folk Buddhism.

I was interested that several monks and nuns rules were designed to prevent nuns falling into a servant role to monks as was common in wider society.

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Kim OHara
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Kim OHara » Thu Jun 21, 2012 1:45 am


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Dan74
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Dan74 » Thu Jun 21, 2012 3:07 am

_/|\_

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Goofaholix
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Thu Jun 21, 2012 3:16 am


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gavesako
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby gavesako » Fri Jun 22, 2012 7:43 pm

There is an interesting response from a Pure Land monastic perspective to an article which appeared recently in the American press:

"North American Buddhists are likely to create their own traditions and schools of thought, but they should do so with the awareness that they are forging a new Buddhist culture, not the ‘true’ Buddhist culture."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/gue ... _blog.html


The response is entitled:




2,555 years ago Buddha passed away leaving the disciples and the rest of the Sangha to remember his teachings and pass them along to the next generations. Very little has changed in the Sangha who carefully follows the Vinaya which are his guidelines of monastic conduct and instructed in his last bequest. They carried Buddha’s teachings (the Dharma) to various countries teaching and forming practice places for generations with a great deal of sacrifice and effort.
Recently in media by Buddhist orientated sites online and in print through Tricycle, Buddhadharma, and Shambala Sun much has been made about the national form that Buddhist followers should or as they assume will eventually take in the USA.
Their Protestantism of Buddhism or rather a sanitizing or erasing/rewriting of Buddha’s history and rejection of what they identify as irrelevant to modern Americans today.
...
This sanitizing of Buddhism is wrong. It is a symptom of lack of effort and study of Buddha dharma. It’s rote repetition of wrong teachings based on fear of loss of their own leadership due to aging and somehow they must keep their flame alive and make a historical memory so their efforts don’t seem wasted to others. The fact of the matter is the hippies are old and their start into Buddhism was filled with false intentions, most are failed monks and they are damn mad that people did not support them when they were innocents in robes, so they formed their careers by damning the robes and those that wear them. All of them… look up the writers for yourself in the rags, tricycle, shambala sun, buddha dharma, the big 3 have featured all white… and all secular people claiming to be experts and leaders of Americans ‘cuz they failed to be monks.
They said they failed to be monks because they failed to get enough dana to do as they want to do (and become hits in their homelands). Instead they were ignored perhaps bored in their robes, fearing poverty and they lacked the balls to stick it out they left their robes because there is no money in them. Then these ex-monks damned repeatedly the very people who had virtuous roots that helped them succeed and go forth and being accepted.
Playing king of the mountain pushing off their competitors. They promoted themselves as experts saying they have really represented Americans cuz they can have sex and create families… and they want their kids to be able to participate fully in their activities in the zendo cuz they don’t feel welcome anyplace but where they want to go and meditate while they ignore how bored their kids are waiting for them and let their kids run around doing things unsupervised while they zone out in hippie bliss or their mental version of it. ...

(read the rest at http://buddhafolk.wordpress.com/2012/06 ... -elitists/ )
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
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mikenz66
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:05 pm



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