"The Broken Buddha" by Ven.Dhammika and other scandals

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:15 pm

I think you are right, I think different cultures should avoid judging each other. It is a waste of time. I also think you are right that a big part of the value of the book is showing Westerners a side of Asian Buddhism they aren't aware of so they can avoid going to the same place and make something new/better in terms of what western Buddhism will become.
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.
Jhana4
 
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby pilgrim » Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:00 pm

TBB puts into words what many are already aware of. In this context it is useful to accurately identify the problems . Denying the problems won't make them go away.
User avatar
pilgrim
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:52 pm

pilgrim wrote:TBB puts into words what many are already aware of.


Mabye "many" but not enough. A similar point is brought up every time this thread is bumped up with a new post. I don't believe it. Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" point is brought up at least a few very well studied people come forward to say that they had no idea those issues existed until they read "The Broken Buddha" by the Venerable S Dhammika.
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.
Jhana4
 
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:58 pm

Jhana4 wrote: Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" . . . .
Sweep what under the rug? Bad scholarship, clumsy ham-handed criticism?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19416
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Jhana4 » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:05 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
Jhana4 wrote: Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" . . . .
Sweep what under the rug? Bad scholarship, clumsy ham-handed criticism?


You are welcome to your opinion.
In reading the scriptures, there are two kinds of mistakes:
One mistake is to cling to the literal text and miss the inner principles.
The second mistake is to recognize the principles but not apply them to your own mind, so that you waste time and just make them into causes of entanglement.
Jhana4
 
Posts: 1309
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:20 pm
Location: U.S.A., Northeast

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby pilgrim » Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:21 am

tiltbillings wrote:
Jhana4 wrote: Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" . . . .
Sweep what under the rug? Bad scholarship, clumsy ham-handed criticism?

Dunnoo what your views are based on. I've read a few of his books and his blog and I think he is one of the more knowledgeable and informed western monks around.
User avatar
pilgrim
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby pilgrim » Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:23 am

Jhana4 wrote:
pilgrim wrote:TBB puts into words what many are already aware of.


Mabye "many" but not enough. A similar point is brought up every time this thread is bumped up with a new post. I don't believe it. Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" point is brought up at least a few very well studied people come forward to say that they had no idea those issues existed until they read "The Broken Buddha" by the Venerable S Dhammika.

I guess I wasn't clear. I totally agree that TBB is a book that needs to be written. Knowing the problem is one thing, but articulating it brings these issues to the surface where they can be observed and perhaps remedies applied.
User avatar
pilgrim
 
Posts: 944
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby manas » Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:30 am

(I deleted what I had written here. Whenever I write something critical of others, even when it's seems quite true (from my pov), I often later on feel like it would have been better to have left it unsaid. Sorry folks - another terminated post. I should change my nick to 'arnie'.)

'how often we regret saying too much, and how seldom too little.'

:anjali:
Last edited by manas on Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
manas
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 3:04 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:35 am

Greetings,

Which then leads us back nicely to the issues discussed recently in..

Richard Gombrich - Comfort or Challenge?
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=10426

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


Dharma Wheel (Mahayana / Vajrayana forum) -- Open flower ~ Open book (blog)
User avatar
retrofuturist
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14657
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Nov 30, 2011 3:43 am

pilgrim wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:
Jhana4 wrote: Every time the "this is nothing people don't already know, can we sweep it under the rug?" . . . .
Sweep what under the rug? Bad scholarship, clumsy ham-handed criticism?

Dunnoo what your views are based on. I've read a few of his books and his blog and I think he is one of the more knowledgeable and informed western monks around.
Having knowledge and knowing how to use it are two different things. My views are based upon reading this wretched thing he wrote and what he said. I have given examples above of a couple serious problems that are indicative of what he says, and I'll be happy to discuss them at length, if you wish..
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19416
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 30, 2011 1:05 pm

manasikara wrote: But if you take a look at us 'Westerners', some sections of our culture are already either watering down, or even seriously distorting, the Dhamma and Discipline. Not all, but some. So, as to the question, "what will Western Buddhism become?", one wouid hope, "maintaining, and representative of, the Dhamma and Discipline". If we don't do that, then in less than a hundred years, we could unravel what the Asians managed to preserve for over 2000 years!

Precisely. A viable, sustainable, Western Buddhism which preserves the Dhamma and Discipline and the symbiotic relationship between lay and ordained that appears to have been a key design feature would certainly be nice to have.

:anjali:
Mike
User avatar
mikenz66
 
Posts: 10284
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Raksha » Wed Nov 07, 2012 2:11 pm

Sorry to recycle this ancient thread but I've only just read this book, and it made a big impression on me. I've discussed it with my old Professor who is an expert on this subject and he told me to read Justin McDaniels books on monastic education for a more optimistic outlook. We both agreed that Ven. Dhammika is clueless on the role of magic and the supernatural in Buddhism, and my old Professor also thought that he was rather naive and optimistic in his expectations. Even so all his criticisms are valid. Interestingly, these are criticisms that any educated Westerner could make. Partly this is due to our Christian background which emphasizes humility and service, and partly due to our exposure to other varieties of Buddhism, but mainly it is due to our scientific culture. Of course it doesn't go all one way, in respect of the supernatural we Westerners are infantile in our understanding. It may be that centuries of science and logic has gifted up with a sharper mindset but distanced us from these very subtle things. What is clear is that Western monks have an extremely important role to play in the future because if it somehow possible to apply the insights of our modern civilisation to the Dhamma, without sacrificing the magical, then the results would be truly wonderful.
Raksha
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:30 pm

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby Sambojjhanga » Wed Nov 07, 2012 5:51 pm

I read the book awhile back myself. I'm actually surprised that anyone is actually surprised by any of this. Afterall, the Buddha himself spoke of such things.

You know what this is:

It's called SAMSARA!

There is NO organization on Earth, religious or otherwise, that isn't infected by this. Industry, the military, education, etc. As for "unserious" monks, that was one of the main reasons Ajaan Mun and the entire Thai Forest tradition STARTED! Read some of the biographies of the serious Thai Forest monks such as Maha Boowa, Ajaan Lee, Ajaan Fuang, Ajaan Chah, etc., etc. and pretty much to a man, they all stated that their first experiences in the Monastery's were with less-than-serious monks and that they had to seek out serious teachers of the Dhamma.

All institutions suffer from this. Lots of people get caught up in power, prestige and status. As has already been stated, look at the super-wealthy Christian preachers. Oh yeah, they are REALLY emulating Jesus...NOT! This doesn't mean that there aren't good and serious Christians, because there are. I was raised Catholic and actually met some very fine priests and nuns...I also met some real stinkers.

As far as scandals, I think that the Mahayana Tibetan's have had more than their share. Again, there are some wonderful Tibetan teachers...there are also some really serious sexual perverts and drunks in these groups ("crazy wisdom" be damned.) We cannot judge an entire group of people or religious teachings based on the misdeeds of a few.

Having said all this, there is ONE person that we can work on and one person ONLY: Ourselves. Whenever I read stories such as these, I just want to redouble my effort to get out of Samsara.

Oh, and one final thing. Ven. Dhammika is wrong about: the lack of anomalous phenomena in spiritual practices. Just because HE hasn't personally experienced them doesn't mean they don't occur. I've experienced them personally, I KNOW they are real.

:anjali:
Sabba rasam dhammaraso jinati
The flavor of the dhamma exceeds all other flavors
User avatar
Sambojjhanga
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:51 pm
Location: San Diego, California, USA

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Nov 07, 2012 6:41 pm

Sambojjhanga wrote:I read the book awhile back myself. I'm actually surprised that anyone is actually surprised by any of this.

I agree, and I would encourage anyone with an interest in Buddhism to spend some time with actual Buddhist practitioners and institutions, which will very quickly give some valuable insight into the positives and negatives that reside in any particular institution.

I actually think there are some useful lessons to be learned from encountering the a large variety of people/skills/seriousness that is apparent in almost any monastary (or lay institution). As Sambojjhanga says, Samsara is a messy place, and anyone who thinks that any institution is going to be an idyllic paradise hasn't been paying attention. But rather than being depressed and bitter about this, I think the constructive response is to learn from the good practice that also does exist almost everywhere. Sometimes not always where you first think, I've actually learned a lot from interacting with (particularly being served by) some of the elderly lay people at my local Wat...

:anjali:
Mike
User avatar
mikenz66
 
Posts: 10284
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: "The Broken Buddha" by Ven. S. Dhammika

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:35 pm

For discussion about:
Sambojjhanga wrote:Oh, and one final thing. Ven. Dhammika is wrong about: the lack of anomalous phenomena in spiritual practices. Just because HE hasn't personally experienced them doesn't mean they don't occur. I've experienced them personally, I KNOW they are real.

See this thread: viewtopic.php?f=16&t=14899

:anjali:
Mike
User avatar
mikenz66
 
Posts: 10284
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

The Nude Monk's Burning Robes

Postby BlackBird » Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:52 am

Hello all

I friend recently linked me this harrowing e book about the culture within the Pa Auk tradition, specifically those at the Na Uyana forest Aranya in Sri Lanka. It is very much in the same vein as 'Broken Buddha' by Venerable Dhammika, except it is a more specific account of matters, it is highly vitriolic, negative and without a single compliment towards those of whom it levels it's criticisms. The claims it levels are very serious indeed, and are worthy of investigation as to whether they are true or not.

I am not passing a great deal of judgement as I have my own practice to get on with, but I would recommend those who have interest in the Pa Auk system to give this book a read before embarking on a Pa Auk course or visiting a Pa Auk monastery.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/64780914/The- ... ning-Robes

The essence of the book is that a number of the monks in the Pa Auk system are parajika. Many have given up on meditation, despite still teaching it to lay students, very few have attained jhana, let alone stream entry, and moral corruption is common place. There are many problems with the text, one such problem is it's heavy use of anecdotes, the source of which appears to be unknown. Still one must question the authors motives, and ask - For what purpose would the author fabricate such accounts? I am not drawing conclusions either way. It is written in a strange manner, the writing style suggests the author is either proficient in English as a second language, either that or the work has been translated. It seems more like a rough draft than a finished piece. But nevertheless, some of the content is indeed disturbing.

Read the book yourself before passing judgment either way. It is a rather inflamatory account, so it might be wise to keep ones mindfulness at the ready when one undertakes a reading of it. I do think it is important however and worthy of a discussion of some sorts. For a time I ascribed to the Pa Auk system, and was even intending on going to Pa Auk forest monastery myself at one stage. I am now glad that decision was not undertaken.

On the basis of some of the reactions, I have decided to include a quote from one of my posts below, in the hopes that potential respondees might read it before reacting:

It is becoming all too obvious that nobody is willing to evaluate the criticisms presented within the book on any objective basis, but instead willing to chalk it all up to 'nobodies perfect' and 'the books biased' and 'it seems to be written maliciously'

Again, I come back to this point:

That does not discredit the very serious allegations made by the author of the book.

Disregarding the points the author has made on the basis of bias, or that the author (and myself for some odd reason) is merely fault finding, or that it's malicious, does NOT discredit the allegations made. We're not just talking about the odd monks not meditating here nor a monks liking of alternative medicine, we're talking about allegations of widespread parajika incidents. I'm not defending the author and what is a very fiery and negative book, in my eyes there appears to be a heavy negative emotional investment on the part of the author. But I'll say it one final time: That does not discredit the allegations made by the author. There have been plenty of grumpy, angst ridden biased individuals throughout history who have blown whistles, their whistle blowing needs to be evaluated on the content itself, not upon the author's feelings.

If you are going to level a fair criticism of the allegations, and I more than hope somebody does, it needs to be on a logical basis, not a knee-jerk reaction.


with metta
Jack
Last edited by BlackBird on Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
User avatar
BlackBird
 
Posts: 1861
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 12:07 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: The Nude Monk's Burning Robes

Postby alan » Tue Jun 18, 2013 2:27 pm

Thanks BlackBird. Seems to me you can't go wrong by staying focused on the Suttas.
alan
 
Posts: 2544
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:14 am
Location: Miramar beach, Fl.

Re: The Nude Monk's Burning Robes

Postby BlackBird » Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:14 am

Hi All

I have read through a good portion of this book. It is apparent that the level of corruption at Na Uyana is absolutely horrendous. If the text is to believed there is a litany of parajikas, sanghadisesa etc going unanswered and unpunished. It reads like an absolute horror story.

Here's a short excerpt:

Poisoning, Drugging, and Neglecting
For someone in mental cultivation, the sensitivity should increase not only about the internal drama but also the gross onethat going externally, but for Ven. Ariyananda, the latter one is a threat. He dwells comfortably when bhikkhus do not knowthings about Nā-Uyana according to reality (yathābhūtam na pajānāti). Sometimes, he know that they know, but just pretends that he do not know that they know. So in the end, both parties pretend that they do not know, and live happily ever after in an artificial ignorance. The Buddha called this 'harmony by non-Dhamma' (adhammena samaggaṃ). But if someone stepped outside this dilemma, showing that he do know, then things get worse by putting his own self in danger.Several years back, Ven. (Digana) Sugatavaṃsa refused those fake dhyanas given by Ven. Ariyananda and accused Ven.Ariyananda and his students as cheating and not having any dhyanas or real practice. This made Ven. Ariyananda more than unhappy, where he blamed and embarrassed Ven. Sugatavaṃsa publicly. Later, the latter left the monastery out of fear of losing his life, claiming that he was poisoned.In 2005 rains retreat, Ven. (Māpanawature) Sumedhālaṅkāra got terribly sick with several occurrences of severe heart attacks. This continued with blood vomiting for several days, and caused him rolling from side to side on a bed. Ven.Ariyananda not only paid no attention to the sick bhikkhu, but also did not allow the monastery vehicle to be used to bring him to hospital. However, on the next day, Ven. Ariyadhamma and Ven. Ariyananda went to attend the birthday celebrationof Mr. H.G. Āriyaratna's wife by the very same monastery vehicle. Later, some bhikkhus managed to bring the sick bhikkhu to hospital by a hired vehicle. However, within a short time, he passed away because of his already failed heart. Doctors accused the other accompanying bhikkhus, asking: “Why knowing that he was critically ill but did not bring him earlier? If you did so we would have save his life.”Ven. Janānanda, an elder bhikkhu just a few vassa younger to Ven. Ariyadhamma. Unlike other elder bhikkhus in Nā-Uyana,he is known for not rejoicing and supporting Ven. Ariyananda's bad behaviours for the sake of survival in Nā-Uyana. Several years back, he was struck with a sudden sickness which made him even unable to get out of the bed. Even though this went on about a week, with attending bhikkhus begging, Ven. Ariyananda to take him to hospital, he allowed only after a visitingdoctor forced—under the request of some residents—him to do so. However, after recovery, Ven. Janānanda left the monastery. Once, Ven. Ariyananda came to a difficult situation of instructing Ven. Ariyavisuddhi with regard to his meditation, wherehe tried to avoid in several sessions redirecting the latter to Ven. Samita. This made the bhikkhu quite uncomfortable,because of bringing him this far but abandoning thereafter. He desperately said: “If you do not give me instructions, I willgo to Ven. Ariyadhamma and complain to him.” During the coming days, he found that certain things were going against him, such as although his hut was far away, he was assigned to sweep Ven. Ariyadhamma's hut, in spite of this duty is normally done by young junior bhikkhus or novice monks. And one day, a henchman gave him some food, saying that he got them from the village. However, several hours after eating, he fell sick with a sudden high blood pressure even without any prior case history, and was unable to stand still for several days. Out of fear for his life in his old age, he left the monastery.Ven. Saddhammālaṅkāra was a bhikkhu who knew much of Ven. Ariyananda's dark side, due to his position as the Sangha store keeper and the involvement with management. He even went so far as to express his unhappiness about Ven. Ariyananda publicly.

Once, Ven. Saddhammālaṅkāra had to be operated for appendicitis, and admitted to government hospital, whereas at the same time a favourable bhikkhu of Ven. Ariyananda was admitted to a private hospital with bettercare for the same sickness. However, Ven. Saddhammālaṅkāra had a week body and was in poor health for many years due to some unknown reason. Doctors recommended him to have expensive check-ups but was unable to do due to receiving no support from Ven. Ariyananda. In the end of 2008, he suffered a sudden death. Before that he told bhikkhus that he was having a continuous stomach pain since several days. However, Ven. Ariyananda advised the bhikkhu who representing Nā-Uyana in the post-mortem as he was present at the moment of the death of the deceased, saying: “There is no need to mention to the coroner about the medicine—a high energy stomach medicine—that I gave him.” Later, Ven. Ariyananda told the other bhikkhus that the deceased was born as a tree deva. Once, he told a foreign bhikkhu who were having a chronic health problem to stay away from Nā-Uyana for some time. To another local bhikkhu who informed Ven. Ariyananda that he had repeated chest pains spreading towards the hand—suspecting it is related to heart attack—he simply replied: “Take aralu.”

This aralu powder, a laxative with a very strongsmell and taste, known among the bhikkhus as Ven. Ariyananda's panacea for all monastery ills. He regularly prescribes this to bhikkhus in high dosages. Once, a foreigner given this in a high dosage, after several shots of diarrhoea, fainted down and had to be admitted to hospital. The doctors were amazed to hear the overdose given. Hearing this, Ven. Ariyananda exclaimed: “What do they know!” There was one old bhikkhu who had certain kind of physical weakness, the doctor advised to inject 1.5 ml of insulin daily for him. One day, another bhikkhu noticed that Ven. Ariyananda was filling a syringe even passing 15 ml. Even though Ven.Ariyananda gave insulin to that old bhikkhu every day, he said that he mistakenly filled it that day. Nobody knows whether he repeated the same mistake on any other day. However, one time, this old bhikkhu had to be admitted to hospital due tohis symptoms became severe. While in the hospital, he angrily claimed to the doctor that he was poisoned when living inthe monastery.Other than these, there were number of cases of mixing certain drugs (e.g. sleeping tablets) into food and drinks of some bhikkhus which caused short-term adverse effects in the targeted bhikkhu. Even though Ven. Ariyananda treat the bhikkhus who in the enemy list cynically, when comes to the opposite, it also change contrarily. Once, Ven. Sudhammācāra's father was admitted to hospital and Ven. Ariyananda used the monastery vehicle and personal to send him food, until the patient dismissed from the hospital. Once, when a rich Singaporean donor wassick, Ven. Ariyananda invited her to come to Sri Lanka, promising to treat and support her
Last edited by BlackBird on Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:22 am, edited 2 times in total.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
User avatar
BlackBird
 
Posts: 1861
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 12:07 pm
Location: New Zealand

Re: The Nude Monk's Burning Robes

Postby gavesako » Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:19 am

There is a history to this book. I don't know the details but I heard from some monks in Sri Lanka that the author later asked for forgiveness and obviously regretted expressing such negatively biased views in the book. One could probably find fault with any established tradition along similar lines.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

ajahnchah.org - Teachings of Ajahn Chah in many languages
Dhammatube - Videos on Buddhist practice
Ancient Buddhist Texts - Translations and history of Pali texts
User avatar
gavesako
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 5:16 pm
Location: England

Re: The Nude Monk's Burning Robes

Postby BlackBird » Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:28 am

gavesako wrote:There is a history to this book. I don't know the details but I heard from some monks in Sri Lanka that the author later asked for forgiveness and obviously regretted expressing such negatively biased views in the book. One could probably find fault with any established tradition along similar lines.


Which kind of monks Bhante? Is it just as possible they were making that up given that perhaps it was their group under the spot light? It is absolutely impossible to say anything with any degree of assuredness in this case, at least in my view. It is very murky water indeed. Given the level of corruption in Sri Lanka especially amongst the Sangha at large I tend to take everything I hear from that region of the world with a skeptical view.

This is not fault finding for fault findings sake. Clearly it is of value in exposing a highly regarded meditation monastery for what this book claims it is: a corrupt and dangerous institution. Those seeking to go there for retreat or ordination could have their lives put at risk, especially if they fall sick - If this book is to be believed.


gavesako wrote: expressing such negatively biased views in the book


Bias? Either the author made up all or some of these anecdotes - In which case he is lying, or he didn't, my question is: Why would he make it up? It would certainly take a very very very extraordinary imagination to come up with these events.
Last edited by BlackBird on Wed Jun 19, 2013 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
User avatar
BlackBird
 
Posts: 1861
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 12:07 pm
Location: New Zealand

PreviousNext

Return to Open Dhamma

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: appicchato, Mr Man and 10 guests