A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

On the cultivation of insight/wisdom
CYM sangha
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Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:39 pm

A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby CYM sangha » Tue Aug 30, 2016 5:12 pm

I have come back to meditation, trying to think mindfully, and attend my nearby Monastery for lectures, gatherings, meals, and fellowship, after 25 hectic years of raising children. My question regards thinking mindfully. I have discovered that over the years I have developed a quick-judging, either/or, black or white, good or bad way of coming to conclusions, a way of thinking that is completely ridiculous, of course, but perhaps somewhat understandable when children/adolescents/young adults are asking you for immediate decisions or directions or answers. Subtly, nuance, and that precious reality of how a truth can contain contradictions...indeed, sometimes must contain contradictions have not been places I have had time in which to dwell for a long time. (I would try to deepen discussions with my children, but perhaps like most youth, they would be bored and impatient).

Perhaps what I am asking for is to know whether others care to reflect on the necessity of not splitting, how anything whole is complex and made of even elements hostile to each other (hostility bringing dynamism and complexity and mystery). If there are Buddhist texts (original) or modern Buddhist writers who discuss this, I would be so appreciative to know the titles.

I hope I have expressed my idea coherently. I welcome your insights.

binocular
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Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:13 pm

Re: A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby binocular » Tue Aug 30, 2016 6:47 pm

Thanissaro Bhikkhu: Judicious vs. Judgmental
Also, search ATI by keyword "judicious" and this gives further results.

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Goofaholix
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Location: New Zealand

Re: A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby Goofaholix » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:37 am

If you are practising mindfulness then all you need to do in regard to thinking is be aware that thinking is occurring.
“Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it.” ― Ajahn Chah

CYM sangha
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Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:39 pm

Re: A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby CYM sangha » Tue Dec 27, 2016 2:06 am

A late thank you to you both. I skimmed the texts and will read them later this week when I have time to myself. :candle:

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cjmacie
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Re: A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby cjmacie » Tue Dec 27, 2016 6:01 am

binocular wrote:Thanissaro Bhikkhu: Judicious vs. Judgmental
Also, search ATI by keyword "judicious" and this gives further results.

Similar:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/power_of_judgment.html

R1111
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:17 am

Re: A tranquil mind vs "splitting" or "either/or" thinking

Postby R1111 » Wed Jan 11, 2017 4:45 am

i think what OP may be referring to is skillful thinking. Methods for skillful thinking would be to get a more detailed picture of reality and avoid oversimplifications. Practising mindfulness and studying will help both deeping understanding and developing wisdom needed for quick, skillful discernment.
please quote me if adressing my posts, otherwise i may not see it. thanks.


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