New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

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New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 18, 2016 9:48 pm

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:03 pm

Thanks. Here's the Wisdom announcement: http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/manual-insight

This has been a long time coming. Here's a 2010 thread about it:
http://www.dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?t=4233

:anjali:
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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:03 pm

Here is more info from Amazon:

Description

Review


“The teachings of Mahasi Sayadaw formed the essential context in which I learned, practiced and studied meditation. That context is beautifully expressed in this book. I owe an inexpressible debt to Mahasi Sayadaw’s scholarship, understanding, and courage of transmission. It is a great gift to have this translation available.” (Sharon Salzberg, author of Lovingkindness)

“Having ordained under Mahasi Sayadaw, I know him as one of the most influential Theravada Buddhist teachers of the 20th century. If your temperament is toward strong samadhi and precise noticing, this book will be an invaluable resource in progressing through the Stages of Insight.” (Rodney Smith, author of Awakening)

“A truly important work of one of the greatest contemporary masters, with rich detail and profound insight.” (Jack Kornfield, author of The Wise Heart)

Product Description

The most comprehensive manual of the practice of insight meditation ( vipassana), written by one of its foremost 20th century proponents, is translated into English for the first time.

Manual of Insight is the magnum opus of Mahasi Sayadaw, one of the originators of the “vipassana movement” that has swept through the Buddhist world over the last hundred years. The manual presents a comprehensive overview of the practice of insight meditation, including the foundational aspects of ethical self-discipline, understanding the philosophical framework for the practice, and developing basic concentration and mindfulness. It culminates with an in-depth exploration of the various types of insight and spiritual fruits that the practice yields.

Authored by the master who brought insight meditation to the West and whose students include Joseph Goldstein, Jack Kornfield, and Sharon Salzberg, Manual of Insight is a veritable Bible for any practitioner of vipassana.

About the Author

The Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw (1904-82), U Sobhana Mahathera, was one of the most eminent meditation masters of modern times and a leader in the contemporary resurgence of Vipassana meditation. He quickly distinguished himself after ordination as a scholar and teacher of the Buddhist scriptures. Placing himself under the guidance of Venerable U Narada Sayadaw and undertaking intensive training in Vipassana meditation, he mastered the technique and went on to popularize vipassana as a systematic practice beneficial for monks and laity alike.

Ven. Mahasi Sayadaw held Burma's highest scholastic honor, the title of Agga Mahapandita, awarded to him in 1952. During the Sixth Buddhist Council, held in Rangoon from 1954 to 1956, he performed the duties of Questioner (pucchaka), a role performed at the First Buddhist Council by the Venerable Mahakassapa. Ven. Mahasi

Sayadaw was also a member of the executive committee that was responsible, as the final authority, for the codification of all the texts edited at the Council.

Thousands of people have been trained at his Thathana Yeiktha Meditation Centre in Yangon and many more have benefited from his clear-cut approach to meditation practice available through his voluminous writings and through the teachings abroad of his disciples, including Joseph Goldstein, Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzberg, Rodney Smith, and many others. More than a hundred branch centers of the Thathana Yeiktha Centre have been established in Burma and his method has spread widely to other countries, East and West.

Ven. Mahasi Sayadaw is the author of numerous works on both meditation and the Buddhist scriptures in his native Burmese.


:namaste:
Last edited by bodom on Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:05 pm

mikenz66 wrote:Thanks. Here's the Wisdom announcement: http://www.wisdompubs.org/manual-insight

This has been a long time coming. Here's a 2010 thread about it:
http://www.dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?t=4233

:anjali:
Mike


Thanks Mike! I'm very much looking forward to reading this book.

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:11 pm

Yes, I wondered if it had been abandoned, it was so long...

:anjali:
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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:25 pm

Practical Insight Meditation is Chapter V of this treatise.

The Sayādaw mentions this two volume treatise in his preface to Practical Insight Meditation.

In Burmese it is called the Vipassana Shu Nee Chan (or something like that).
AIM WebsitePāli FontsIn This Very LifeBuddhist ChroniclesSoftware (Upasampadā: 24th June, 1979)

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby bodom » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:58 pm

mikenz66 wrote:Yes, I wondered if it had been abandoned, it was so long...

:anjali:
Mike


I'm starting too wonder the same thing about the new Buddhadasa Bhikkhu book on dependent origination that was supposed to have been released already. Wisdom may take there time with new releases but they always put out quality books.

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby bodom » Sat Mar 19, 2016 7:25 am

For anyone who is interested, the following link contains all of Mahasi Sayadaws writings, including his magnom opus the Manual of Insight which is the focus of this thread:

http://www.saraniya.com/page/ebooks/ebo ... yadaw.html

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby Modus.Ponens » Sun Mar 20, 2016 1:03 pm

bodom wrote:For anyone who is interested, the following link contains all of Mahasi Sayadaws writings, including his magnom opus the Manual of Insight which is the focus of this thread:

http://www.saraniya.com/page/ebooks/ebo ... yadaw.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:namaste:


Thank you very much. I've heard of Mahasi Sayadaw's treatise on the dhamma talk that Tilt published a few weeks ago and got very interested if it was even translated into english. Apparently they've finished the translation. Ironically, a tradition I was so skeptical of is now the one I read about most.

:anjali:
He turns his mind away from those phenomena, and having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.'
(Jhana Sutta - Thanissaro Bhikkhu translation)

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby D8ken » Sat Apr 16, 2016 2:53 pm

Hi,

Just letting you know that the book is now available here: http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/manual-insight

Also, you might like to check out the recent interview with Steve Armstrong which touches on the book. You can listen to it here: http://learn.wisdompubs.org/podcast/

- Daniel

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby JohnK » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:34 pm

D8ken wrote:Hi,

Just letting you know that the book is now available here: http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/manual-insight" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

- Daniel


Ordered mine from the website 4/15 (the first day I could) and received order confirmation; yet to receive shipping confirmation.
Just told It is on backorder -- "any day now" -- not sure if demand was so great that they sold out first day :!: or if they put it on sale before they had copies to ship. :shrug:
Apparently, I'm grasping!

Edit: copies in stock, shipped 5/2/2016.
"Why is it, Master Kaccana, that ascetics fight with ascetics?"
"It is, brahmin, because of attachment to views, adherence to views, fixation on views, addiction to views, obsession with views, holding firmly to views that ascetics fight with ascetics."
(AN 2: iv, 6, abridged)

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby cjmacie » Fri Jun 03, 2016 8:19 am

This book was already translated into English in 1984 (and that freely available on the internet -- 4 PDF files) -- s/w more challenging to read (closer to Burmese syntax), but, IMO, more faithful to the original. To understand Mahasi in this a more profound writing than the more popular practice method books, one has to be prepared to deal with complex ideas and language usage. The new translators explicitly "balanced" (compromised?) accuracy against English "readability", where the question arises -- does that mean more intelligible (watered-down) to Western Buddhist sensibility? (Sorry, my view is s/w biased here.)

Surprised not to find mention here (Dhammawheel) questioning the claim that the new book is "the first translation into English", or more detailed examination of the book.

(I searched Dhammawheel for "Mahasi treatise" and came up only with this thread.)

for further discussion, analysis, questions -- for what it's worth -- at...
http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/443445#_19_message_5853153

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby cjmacie » Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:27 am

:oops:
Apologies, I overlooked the post "bodom » Sat Mar 19, 2016 7:25 am ", which pointed-out the 1984 translation and where it's available on the internet.

I read -- actually more scanned -- Volume i Part i of it about a year ago, and found it impressive. I was trying to track down the origin of the term "vipassana jhana", which seemed s/w paradoxical. It's used a lot by some of the "pragmatic Buddhism" teachers, and spelled out in a book by U. Pandita.

Searching (via grep) the large collection of Mahasi's works (in English) that I've assembled (digital form, from the internet) found no usage of "vipassana jhana". So I then looked to the Treatise/Manual of Insight/Vipassana. Mahasi does use the terms "Vipassanā samādhi" and "Vipassanā khaṇika samādhi" -- where he means by 'khanika' something rather more intense than some other teachers (e.g. Ayya Khema, who considers khanika in a far more mundane sense). He spells out the relationship between practitioners who use a more samādhi or a more vipassanā path, according to training or inclination. He notes that Vipassanā samādhi can have the same intensity as appanā-samādhi.

"...this Vipassanā khaṇika samādhi ... can be developed and maintained, niccalam- permanently without any flitting or agitation, appitoviya- just like Jhāna-samādhi which is absorbed in the object, or rather, like Appanāsamādhi." (ca. p.120 in Vol i part i)

Here's a rather long description of that search and the result, with more quotations:
http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/5760551#_19_message_5761746

(Is it OK to post links like that here?)

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Jun 04, 2016 12:25 am

Thanks cjmacie, that's very interesting. It's very odd that this new project was not aware of the 1984 translation. However, as your analysis shows, it may well be helpful that we have two quite different translations to refer to.

I particularly liked your analysis of Vipassana Samadhi (AKA Vipassana Jhāna) http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/5760551#_19_message_5761746
I wonder if the use of "jhāna", rather than "samādhi" in the translation of "In this Very Life". http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/5760551#_19_message_5761746 was U Pandita's, or a choice of the particular translators that worked on that book. It's common to see people equating samadhi with jhana, and claiming that "right samādhi" has to mean jhāna, but it seems that's an oversimplification. See, for example Ven Analayo's series of lectures and discussions on Tranquility and Insight: http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=26154.

See the Samādhibhāvanā Sutta:
“Monks, these are the four developments of samādhi. Which four? There is the development of samādhi that, when developed & pursued, leads to a pleasant abiding in the here & now. There is the development of samādhi that, when developed & pursued, leads to the attainment of knowledge & vision. There is the development of samādhi that, when developed & pursued, leads to mindfulness & alertness. There is the development of samādhi that, when developed & pursued, leads to the ending of the effluents.
https://suttacentral.net/en/an4.41/1

The first of these samādhis is jhana, of course.

The last two:
There is the case where feelings are known to the monk as they arise, known as they persist, known as they subside. ...

There is the case where a monk remains focused on arising & falling away with reference to the five clinging-aggregates: ...

seem to be relevant to "vipassana-samādhi".

:anjali:
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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby cjmacie » Tue Jun 07, 2016 11:50 am

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Jun 03, 2016 4:25 pm

"I wonder if the use of "jhāna", rather than "samādhi" in the translation of "In this Very Life"…was U Pandita's, or a choice of the particular translators that worked on that book. It's common to see people equating samadhi with jhana, and claiming that "right samādhi" has to mean jhāna, but it seems that's an oversimplification."
That's a good point. And your further quotations / discussion on types of samadhi.

1) In Western discussions/forums there seems an almost categorical distinction enforced between vipassana and samadhi (notably in the so-called "jhana wars"); as well as strong bias towards the primacy of vipassana – as in oft repeated statements that vipassana is sufficient for unbinding, but jhana / samadhi is not. (I like Ayya Khema's take: "jhana is necessary but not sufficient".) This may well be influencing translation policies. (As I sense particularly in the case of the new Mahasi translation, translation is invariably interpretation.)

Keying-off a statement by Than-Geoff – that the Buddha often recommends his followers to 'go off (into seclusion) and do jhana', but never 'go off and do vipassana'… I once searched the Nikayas (Wisdom Pub. English editions), via the indexes, for these two terms, finding that the term vipassana ALWAYS appears paired with samadhi. That re-enforces his (and many other heavy-weight Theravadans') interpretation that samadhi and vipassana go hand in hand, and both are necessary.

Mahasi's passages (in the Manual/Treatise) also support this view. What he means by vipassana is a very strongly concentrated experience -- Vipassana-samadhi as virtually equivalent to appana-samadhi (jhana). (I also found, in closely reading Mahasi's more introductory texts, that what he meant by "noting" is "direct knowing", i.e. with the strength of gnosis; not just casually pinning labels on passing mental phenomena.)

The teachings of the heavy-weight Asian Sayadaws and Ajahns don't seem to teach the Western-style rigid separation of samadhi and vipassana (though perhaps some of the more introductory-level instructors might). I've had brief discussions at weekend retreats with Sayadaw Thuzana (abbot at Tathagata Meditation Center nearby in San Jose). His intro meditation instructions are party-line Mahasi noting, but when questioned, he seems to readily, even enthusiastically, accept the use of jhana techniques together with the vipassana method.

In my own practice, after first learning (with teachers Shaila Catherine and U. Jagara) the Visuddhimagga / PaAuk style jhana-s (hard absorption), I've noticed that the practice of it seems to naturally develop into something that's more samadhi and vipassana together. Initially, absorption was a dramatic sort of quantum change, followed by a tendency to "bliss-out" in the beauty of the mental stillness. Over time, though, the absorption becomes easier and less dramatic; the succeeding states leaning more to seeing clearly, from the vantage point of a still mind (not itself initiating action), how peripheral phenomena (both sensory and 'mind-gate') impinge on the outer edges. (Less so with "4th jhana", but that's rarer and, so far, less "mastered".) Observed in that way, these phenomena seem to reveal their origins and structure ever more clearly. I haven't had a chance to check this out with the teachers (i.e. on retreat) yet, but have the sense that is a proper development, and demonstrates the inseparable mutually supporting functionality of samadhi and vipassana. "… the knife of insight, honed on the stone of concentration, cutting through the tangle…" – to paraphrase from the introduction of the Visuddhimagga.

2) The "4 developments of samadhi" – interesting; I'd not seen that one before (AN4.41).

'Samadhi ' appears to be clearly "concentration", in various flavors. 'Jhana' has a strong sense of concentration in present-day discussions, but historically, and as Pali equivalent of Sanskrit Dhyana (that's used in many other traditions), it may also be said to refer rather generally to just sitting there and meditating in some way.

The first (in AN4.41) does looks like blissing-out jhana/absorption. Bhikkhu Bodhi, in a footnote, thinks it refers to either an arahant who doesn't need to work at development, or a trainee maybe taking a break to just refresh the mind between strenuous vipassana sessions (like in PaAuk method). The second one is strange – light, day and night; B.Bodhi footnote: the commentary says it's "divine eye". The third & fourth do look a lot like Satipatthana, which is often seen today as strictly vipassana, though I've read interpretations (maybe it was Sujato in A History of Mindfulness) that the Satipatthana-Sutta is really about samadhi. So "…seem to be relevant to "vipassana-samādhi"" would cover both bases.

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 4:43 pm

Thanks for your comments, cjmacie. Plenty there to investigate...

:anjali:
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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 7:09 pm

2) The "4 developments of samadhi" – interesting; I'd not seen that one before (AN4.41).


Also check out this sutta:

Bāla 11,
“These two qualities have a share in clear knowing. Which two? Tranquillity (samatha) & insight (vipassana).

“When tranquillity is developed, what purpose does it serve? The mind is developed. And when the mind is developed, what purpose does it serve? Passion is abandoned.

“When insight is developed, what purpose does it serve? Discernment is developed. And when discernment is developed, what purpose does it serve? Ignorance is abandoned.

“Defiled by passion, the mind is not released. Defiled by ignorance, discernment does not develop. Thus from the fading of passion is there awareness-release. From the fading of ignorance is there discernment-release.”


And: Arahattappatti
Ven. Ananda said: “Friends, whoever—monk or nun—declares the attainment of arahantship in my presence, they all do it by means of one or another of four paths. Which four?

“There is the case where a monk has developed insight preceded by tranquillity. As he develops insight preceded by tranquillity, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it—his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed.
...
[and so on for other permutations]

:anjali:
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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 7:09 pm

2) The "4 developments of samadhi" – interesting; I'd not seen that one before (AN4.41).


Also check out this sutta:

Bāla 11,
“These two qualities have a share in clear knowing. Which two? Tranquillity (samatha) & insight (vipassana).

“When tranquillity is developed, what purpose does it serve? The mind is developed. And when the mind is developed, what purpose does it serve? Passion is abandoned.

“When insight is developed, what purpose does it serve? Discernment is developed. And when discernment is developed, what purpose does it serve? Ignorance is abandoned.

“Defiled by passion, the mind is not released. Defiled by ignorance, discernment does not develop. Thus from the fading of passion is there awareness-release. From the fading of ignorance is there discernment-release.”


And: Arahattappatti
Ven. Ananda said: “Friends, whoever—monk or nun—declares the attainment of arahantship in my presence, they all do it by means of one or another of four paths. Which four?

“There is the case where a monk has developed insight preceded by tranquillity. As he develops insight preceded by tranquillity, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it—his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed.
...
[and so on for other permutations]

:anjali:
Mike

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Jun 09, 2016 7:07 pm

cjmacie wrote::oops:
Apologies, I overlooked the post "bodom » Sat Mar 19, 2016 7:25 am ", which pointed-out the 1984 translation and where it's available on the internet.

I read -- actually more scanned -- Volume i Part i of it about a year ago, and found it impressive. I was trying to track down the origin of the term "vipassana jhana", which seemed s/w paradoxical. It's used a lot by some of the "pragmatic Buddhism" teachers, and spelled out in a book by U. Pandita.

Searching (via grep) the large collection of Mahasi's works (in English) that I've assembled (digital form, from the internet) found no usage of "vipassana jhana". So I then looked to the Treatise/Manual of Insight/Vipassana. Mahasi does use the terms "Vipassanā samādhi" and "Vipassanā khaṇika samādhi" -- where he means by 'khanika' something rather more intense than some other teachers (e.g. Ayya Khema, who considers khanika in a far more mundane sense). He spells out the relationship between practitioners who use a more samādhi or a more vipassanā path, according to training or inclination. He notes that Vipassanā samādhi can have the same intensity as appanā-samādhi.

"...this Vipassanā khaṇika samādhi ... can be developed and maintained, niccalam- permanently without any flitting or agitation, appitoviya- just like Jhāna-samādhi which is absorbed in the object, or rather, like Appanāsamādhi." (ca. p.120 in Vol i part i)

Here's a rather long description of that search and the result, with more quotations:
http://www.dharmaoverground.org/web/guest/discussion/-/message_boards/message/5760551#_19_message_5761746

(Is it OK to post links like that here?)

Note that the term vipassana jhana also appears in
Mahāsi Sayādaw. A Discourse on the Wheel of Dhamma

:anjali:
Mike

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Re: New Mahasi Sayadaw book to be released by Wisdom Pubs

Postby Infiniteseeker » Wed Dec 21, 2016 3:36 am

Hi all

Does anyone know where i can get this book in Yangon? Visiting Burma for a few days and would like to get some books


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