Hypothetically: Are Thoughts Vectors?

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Hypothetically: Are Thoughts Vectors?

Postby Zenainder » Fri May 31, 2013 4:13 pm

In my practice of meditation it occurred to me that as I observed my thoughts it seemed as though they have an angle and force (vector). Obviously this would be metaphorically speaking, but has anyone else while observing thoughts notice them come and go as if having a direction and force? For example, while sitting next to a street, staring straight ahead, and observing in your line of sight a car coming from the left and disappearing on the right, some traveling faster than others. This would be the closest example I have. It may have no meaning, but curious of any thoughts both philosophically and / or a sharing of experiences.

Metta,

Zen
If the words "I", "me", or "you" are used, they are for the use of convenience related purposes. None of these exist, of course. ;)
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Re: Hypothetically: Are Thoughts Vectors?

Postby SamKR » Fri May 31, 2013 11:44 pm

I think thoughts are not in vector space but they may arise like a group of complex scalars, undergo nonlinear transformation, and finally pass away to zero. :tongue:
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Re: Hypothetically: Are Thoughts Vectors?

Postby BlackBird » Sat Jun 01, 2013 12:46 am

Well thoughts have intention as a part of them, they are always directed towards something, and for the worldling, craving is also a (gratuitous) part of it.

metta
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"And so, because this Teaching is so different from what Westerners are accustomed to, they will try to adapt the Teaching to their own framework. What they need to learn to do is not to adapt the Teaching to their own point of view but to adapt their own point of view to the Teaching. This is called saddhá, or faith, and it means giving oneself to the Teaching even if the Teaching is contrary to one’s own preconceived notions of the way things are."- Ven Bodhesako

Nanavira Thera's teachings - An existential approach to the Dhamma | Ven. Bodhesako's essay on anicca
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