good books for those wishing to become a monk

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good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 7:51 pm

Can someone recommend good books for those who wish to become a monk and are doing something about it, taking steps to become a monk.

hopefully in my case in one and a half year im a samanera.

so any good books about the life of a monk or other useful information, life stories of westerners becoming a monk, anything in this area.

thanks already :anjali:
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby BlackBird » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:03 pm

I found the autobiographies of two very good forest monks: Ajahn Thate and Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo to be very inspiring.

Here is Ajahn Thate's:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... eauto.html

Ajahn Lee's:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai/lee/leeauto.pdf

metta
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'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:11 pm

Not a book, but see the Going Forth site.
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:18 pm

Bhikku Pesala, are you sure you put the link right, i tried it and it cant find the server of that site.

thanks
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby appicchato » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:49 pm

Works for me... :coffee:
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:51 pm

ah now it works. Thanks very much Bhikku Pesala and Blackbird
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 9:20 pm

anyone else, real books maybe? :p
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby boris » Thu Dec 05, 2013 9:33 pm

Some good advices for monks in general, were given by Climacus. The Ladder of Divine Ascent - Prudence True
For example:

Those who enter this contest must renounce all things, despise all things, deride all things, and shake off all things, that they may lay a firm foundation. A good foundation of three layers and three pillars is innocence, fasting and temperance.

But he who has an attachment to anything visible is not yet delivered from grief. For how is it possible not to be sad at the loss of something we love?

Let us pay close attention to ourselves so that we are not deceived into thinking that we are following the strait and narrow way when in actual fact we are keeping to the wide and broad way. The following will show you what the narrow way means: mortification of the stomach, all-night standing, water in moderation, short rations of bread, the purifying draught of dishonour, sneers, derision, insults, the cutting out of one’s own will, patience in annoyances, unmurmuring endurance of scorn, disregard of insults, and the habit, when wronged, of bearing it sturdily; when slandered, of not being indignant; when humiliated, not to be angry; when condemned, to be humble. Blessed are they who follow the way we have just described, for theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.

If anyone thinks he is without attachment to some object, but is grieved at its loss, then he is completely deceiving himself.

The man who associates with people of the world or approaches them after his renunciation will certainly either fall into their traps or will defile his heart by thinking about them; or if he is not defiled himself yet by condemning those who are defiled, he too will himself be defiled.

As of all foods bread is the most essential, so the thought of death is the most necessary of all works. The remembrance of death amongst those in the midst of society gives birth to distress and frivolity, and even more—to despondency. But amongst those who are free from noise it produces the putting aside of cares, and constant prayer and guarding of the mind.

A true sign of those who are mindful of death in the depth of their being is a voluntary detachment from every creature and complete renunciation of their own will.

Another who lived here in the place called Thola, often went into ecstasy at the thought of death; and the brothers who found him would lift him and carry him off scarcely breathing, like one who had fainted or had an epileptic fit.
He who has died to all things remembers death, but who ever is still tied to the world does not cease plotting against himself.

The beginning of freedom from anger is silence of the lips when the heart is agitated; the middle is silence of the thoughts when there is a mere disturbance of soul; and the end is an imperturbable calm under the breath of unclean winds.

A vigilant monk is a foe to fornication but a sleepy one mates with it.

A monk who denies himself sleep is a fisher of thoughts, and in the stillness of the night he can easily observe and catch them.

Long sleep produces forgetfulness, but vigil purifies the memory.

The inexperienced monk is wide awake in friendly conversation; but his eyes become heavy when the hour of prayer is upon him.

If you pursue virtue in a monastery or community, you are not likely to be attacked much by fear. But the man who spends his time in more solitary places should make every effort to avoid being overcome by that offspring of vainglory, that daughter of unbelief, cowardice.
The man who wants to avoid grotesque collapses should not look for anything to fulfill him in space and time.

Nicolás Gómez Dávila
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Babadhari » Thu Dec 05, 2013 9:46 pm

maybe not along the lines of what you're looking for but 'autobiography of a sadhu' by Baba Ram Puri of the Hindu Juna Akhara sect is a good book
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Viscid » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:29 pm

I found Getting Off - A Portrait by Samanera Bodhesako to be one of the most honest depictions of Theravadin monkdom.
"What holds attention determines action." - William James
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby SarathW » Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:51 am

If I want to become a monk, I need my preceptor to be a person who is not handling money.
Is this possible?

==========
The Ten Precepts:


1. Panatipata veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from harming or taking life).

2. Adinnadanna veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from taking what is not given).

3. Abrahmacariya veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from any sexual contact).

4. Musavada veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from false speech).

5. Sura meraya majjapamadatthana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from the use of intoxicants).

6. Vikalabhojana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from taking food after midday).

7. Nacca gita vadita visuka dassana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from dancing, singing, music or any kind of entertainment).

8. Mala ganda vilepana dharana mandana vibhusanatthana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from the use of garlands, perfumes, unguents and adornments).

9. Uccasayana mahasayana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from using luxurious seats).

10. Jatarupa rajata patiggahana veramani sikkhapadam samadiyami
(I undertake to abstain from accepting and holding money
:shrug:
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Fri Dec 06, 2013 1:23 pm

Viscid wrote:I found Getting Off - A Portrait by Samanera Bodhesako to be one of the most honest depictions of Theravadin monkdom.


the first link doesnt work.
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Viscid » Fri Dec 06, 2013 8:49 pm

konchokzopa wrote:
Viscid wrote:I found Getting Off - A Portrait by Samanera Bodhesako to be one of the most honest depictions of Theravadin monkdom.


the first link doesnt work.


Looks like it was removed shortly after I mentioned the link. Interesting. Perhaps because Path Press has published the book, so you'll have to buy it.
"What holds attention determines action." - William James
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby BlackBird » Fri Dec 06, 2013 10:39 pm

Getting off: A Portrait is a brilliant account. It's a real shame it's been removed for some reason - I was re-reading it only a few months ago, Bhante's wit and humour made the account such a pleasure to read :(

metta
Jack
"For a disciple who has conviction in the Teacher's message & lives to penetrate it, what accords with the Dhamma is this:
'The Blessed One is the Teacher, I am a disciple. He is the one who knows, not I." - MN. 70 Kitagiri Sutta
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Dhammanando » Fri Dec 06, 2013 11:15 pm

    ...and this thought arose in the mind of the Blessed One:
    “Who lives without reverence lives miserably.”
    Uruvela Sutta, A.ii.20

    It were endless to dispute upon everything that is disputable.
    — William Penn Some Fruits of Solitude,
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby konchokzopa » Fri Dec 06, 2013 11:15 pm

BlackBird wrote:Getting off: A Portrait is a brilliant account. It's a real shame it's been removed for some reason - I was re-reading it only a few months ago, Bhante's wit and humour made the account such a pleasure to read :(

metta
Jack



well good that its in book format, its always nicer to read actual books than through the computer screen.
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Jayantha-NJ » Mon Dec 09, 2013 1:06 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:Not a book, but see the Going Forth site.


Thank you for this website Bhante


also for those who recommended the getting off book,I just ordered it off amazon. My long journey moving towards renunciation is come to a close as if all goes as planned I will go in to Bhavana Society as a resident with intent to renounce in May. If all does not go as planned, well who knows where life will take me :). The wisdom of monastics who have gone before is always welcome.


konchokzopa I wish you well in your practice friend :)
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby Jayantha-NJ » Thu Jan 09, 2014 3:47 am

Viscid wrote:I found Getting Off - A Portrait by Samanera Bodhesako to be one of the most honest depictions of Theravadin monkdom.



I just finished this book on recommendation of you guys in this thread. It was an amazing and captivating book that made me think about things I had not previously even pondered in my journey towards renouncing(now only a mere 4 months away!). It helped me simultaneously become more confident in my decision but also more scared about staying power. As I said before I don't know if it will be a life long thing, but It is something I feel I need to do.

thank you guys for this amazing recommendation. i think I'm going to read " One Night's Shelter: From home to homelessness , the autobiography of an american Buddhist monk by Bhikkhu Rahula. I've had this book for a few years now but never delved into it, preferring straight dhamma books.
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby JacquelineR » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:50 pm

I'd like to make a slightly heterodox recommendation- read anything by Thomas Merton. He was a Catholic monk who encountered Buddhism later in life and felt a deep sense of connection with Buddhism.

In particular, I'd recommend "The Wisdom of the Desert Fathers". While the monastic forms of the Desert Fathers were different to ours (they wove baskets to make a living), a lot of their habits are very close to the habits of Buddhist monastics and they practiced "interior silence".
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Re: good books for those wishing to become a monk

Postby culaavuso » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:26 pm

konchokzopa wrote:anyone else, real books maybe? :p


Autobiography of a Forest Monk (Ven. Ajahn Tate's autobiography) is available in book form as well, not just the online copy mentioned above.

Wat Mettavanaram will send you free books from their list of available material. This includes Ven. Ajaan Lee's autobiography mentioned above as well as the biographies of Ven. Ajahn Mun Bhuridatta and Ven. Ajahn Khao Analayo.

If you're looking to ordain, it might also be interesting to request a copy of the Buddhist Monastic Code in order to gain a deep understanding of the Vinaya.
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