SN 35.200 (241): Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

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SN 35.200 (241): Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:07 am

SN 35.200 PTS: S iv 179 CDB ii 1241, SN 2.41 in Bhikku Bodhi's translation.
Daruka-khandha Sutta: The Log
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


A lowly cowherd overhears the Buddha speak of the many hazards that lurk in the stream to Nibbana. He takes it to heart and soon succeeds in reaching the goal.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Ajjheya on the bank of the river Ganges. He saw a large log being carried along by the current near the bank of the river Ganges, and on seeing it said to the monks: "Monks, do you see that large log being carried along by the current of the river Ganges?"

"Yes, lord."

"Monks, if that log doesn't veer toward the near shore, doesn't veer toward the far shore, doesn't sink in the middle, doesn't get washed up on high ground, doesn't get snared by human beings, doesn't get snared by non-human beings, doesn't get snared in a whirlpool, and doesn't become rotten inside, it will tend to the ocean, tilt to the ocean, incline to the ocean. Why is that? Because the current of the river Ganges tends to the ocean, tilts to the ocean, inclines to the ocean.

"In the same way, monks, if you don't veer toward the near shore, don't veer toward the far shore, don't sink in the middle, don't get washed up on high ground, don't get snared by human beings, don't get snared by non-human beings, don't get snared in a whirlpool, and don't become rotten inside, you will tend to Unbinding, tilt to Unbinding, incline to Unbinding. Why is that? Because right view tends to Unbinding, tilts to Unbinding, inclines to Unbinding."

When this was said, a certain monk addressed the Blessed One: "What, lord, is the near shore? What is the far shore? What is sinking in the middle? What is being washed up on high ground? What is being snared by human beings? What is being snared by non-human beings? What is being snared by a whirlpool? What is becoming rotten inside?"

"'The near shore,' monks, stands for the six internal sense media. 'The far shore' stands for the six external sense media. 'Sinking in the middle' stands for passion & delight. 'Being washed up on high ground' stands for the conceit, 'I am.'

"And what, monks, is being snared by human beings? There is the case where a monk lives entangled with householders, delighting with them and sorrowing with them, happy when they are happy, pained when they are in pain, taking on their affairs as his own duty. This is called being snared by human beings.

"And what, monks, is being snared by non-human beings? There is the case where a certain monk lives the holy life in hopes of a certain company of devas, [thinking,] 'By means of this virtue or practice or austerity or holy life I will become one sort of deva or another.' This is called being snared by non-human beings.

"'Being snared by a whirlpool' stands for the five strings of sensuality.

" And what, monks, is becoming rotten inside? There is the case where a certain monk is unprincipled, evil, unclean and suspect in his undertakings, hidden in his actions, not a contemplative though claiming to be one, not leading the holy life though claiming to do so, inwardly rotten, oozing with desire, filthy by nature. This is called becoming rotten inside."

Now at that time Nanda the cowherd was standing not far from the Blessed One. Then he said to the Blessed One, "Lord, I don't veer toward the near shore, I don't veer toward the far shore, I won't sink in the middle, I won't get washed up on high ground, I won't get snared by human beings, I won't get snared by non-human beings, I won't get snared in a whirlpool, and I won't become rotten inside. It would be good, lord, if I could obtain the Going-forth, if I could obtain the Full Acceptance (as a monk).

"In that case, Nanda, lead the cows back to their owners."

"The cows will go back, lord, out of attachment for their calves."

"Lead the cows back to their owners, Nanda."

Then, having led the cows back to their owners, Nanda the cowherd went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, told him, "The cows, lord, have been led back to their owners. Let me obtain the Going-forth in the Blessed One's presence! Let me obtain the Full Acceptance!"

So Nanda the cowherd obtained the Going-forth in the Blessed One's presence, he obtained the Full Acceptance. And not long after his Acceptance — dwelling alone, secluded, heedful, ardent, & resolute — he in no long time reached & remained in the supreme goal of the holy life, for which clansmen rightly go forth from home into homelessness, knowing & realizing it for himself in the here & now. He knew: "Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for the sake of this world." And thus Ven. Nanda became another one of the arahants.


See also: Iti 109 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... ml#iti-109
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Re: SN 35.200: Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:09 am

Daruka-khandha Sutta: The Log
translated from the Pali by John Ireland


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... passage-60

At one time the Lord was staying near Kosambii on the bank of the river Ganges. Now the Lord saw a large log of wood being carried along by the current of the river Ganges and on seeing it said to the bhikkhus:

"Bhikkhus, do you see that large log of wood being carried along by the current of the river Ganges?"

"Yes, Sir."

"If that log of wood, bhikkhus, does not run aground on the near bank or the far bank, does not sink in midstream, is not caught on a sandbank, is not seized by humans or non-humans, is not held in a whirlpool, does not rot from within — then that log of wood will float down to the ocean, will be led down to the ocean, will tend towards the ocean.

"Similarly, bhikkhus, if you do not run aground on the near bank or the far bank, if you do not sink in midstream, if you are not caught on a sandbank, if you are not seized by humans or non-humans, if you are not held in a whirlpool, If you do not rot from within — then you will float down to Nibbaana, you will be led down to Nibbaana, you will tend towards Nibbaana. What is the reason? Right view, bhikkhus, floats to Nibbaana, leads to Nibbaana, tends towards Nibbaana."

On this being said a certain bhikkhu asked the Lord: "What, Sir, is the near bank? What is the far bank? What is sinking in midstream? What is being caught on a sandbank? What is being seized by humans? What is being seized by non-humans? What is being held in a whirlpool? What is rotting from within?"

"'The near bank,' bhikkhu, is a designation for the six internal sense-bases. 'The far bank' is a designation for the six external sense-bases. 'Sinking in midstream' is a designation for enjoyment and attachment. 'Being caught on a sandbank' is a designation for the 'I am-conceit.' Now what is 'being seized by humans'? Herein a bhikkhu lives in close association with lay folk. He shares their joys and sorrows. He is happy with those who are happy, he suffers with those who suffer. He involves himself in all manner of business that goes on. This is called 'being seized by humans.'

"Now what is 'being seized by non-humans'? Herein, bhikkhu, someone lives the holy life with the aspiration [to be born after death] among a certain group of devas. [He aspires:] 'By this virtuous conduct or observance or austerity or holy living may I become a deva or a certain kind of deva.' This is called 'being seized by non-humans.'

"'Being held in a whirlpool' is a designation for the fivefold sensual pleasures.

"Now what is 'rotting from within'? Herein, bhikkhus, someone is immoral, of an evil nature, impure, of dubious behavior, of concealed deeds. Not a recluse, though pretending to be a recluse; not one who lives the holy life, though pretending to be one who does so; rotten within, full of desires, a heap of impurity. This is called 'rotting from within.'"

Now at that time Nanda the cowherd was standing near the Lord... and said: "I, Sir, have not run aground on the near bank. I have not run aground on the far bank, I shall not sink in midstream, I shall not be caught on a sandbank, neither humans nor non-humans shall seize me, I shall not be held in a whirlpool, I shall not rot from within. Sir, may I obtain the going forth in the Lord's presence, may I obtain full ordination?"

"Nanda, you must return the cattle to their owners."

"They will go back by themselves, Sir; the cows are longing for their calves."

"Do return them, Nanda."

Then Nanda the cowherd, having returned the cattle to their owners, approached the Lord... and said: "Sir, the cattle are restored. May I obtain, Sir, the going forth in the Lord's presence, may I obtain full ordination?"

And Nanda the cowherd obtained the going forth in the Lord's presence, obtained full ordination. And not long after his ordination the venerable Nanda, living alone, secluded, diligent, ardent and resolute, soon realized here and now, through his own direct knowledge, that unequaled quest of the holy life... And the venerable Nanda became one of the Perfected Ones.
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Re: SN 35.200: Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

Postby cooran » Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:04 am

Great Sutta! Thanks Mike. :group:

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---
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Re: SN 35.200 (241): Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Aug 27, 2011 5:09 am

First four similes connected with the Great Log (SN 2.41 in Bhikku Bodhi's translation);

Near shore: six internal sense bases.
Far shore: six external sense bases.
Sinking mid-stream: delight and lust.
Getting cast up on high ground: the conceit 'I am'.

I think it's interesting to examine similes such as these, and how they resonate. The analysis of experience here is in terms of the sense bases (rather than five khandas).

In SN 35.197, discussed earlier http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=9305#p143611, and a number of other suttas in which the near shore is perious and the far shore is the goal. However, in the present sutta the goal is to stay in the stream, not getting entangled. So being entangled in either of the shore (internal or external bases), or "sinking" (desire and lust) or "stuck on high ground" (conceit 'I am') are all obstacles.

Question: How do the "sinking"/"high ground" similes resonate with your understandings of desire and lust/conceit?

:anjali:
Mike
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Re: SN 35.200 (241): Daruka-khandha Sutta — The Log

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:45 am

After the sense-base similes we proceed to "conventional reality" similes:

"And what, bhikkhu is getting caught by human beings? Here, someone lives in association with lay people; he rejoices with them and sorrows with them, he is happy when they are happy and sad when they are sad, and he involves himself in their affairs and duties."

BB: See also 22:3
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"And how is one intimate in villages? There is the case where a certain person lives entangled with householders. Delighting together with them, sorrowing together with them, happy when they are happy, pained when they are pained, he takes on any of their arisen business affairs as his own duty. This is how one is intimate in villages.



"And what, bhikkhu, is getting caught up by non-human beings? here, someone lives the holy life with the aspiration [to be reborn] into a certain order of devas, thinking: 'By this virtue or vow or austerity or holy life I will become a deva or one among the devas', ...

"'Getting caught in a whirlpool': this bhikkhu is a designation for the five cords of sensual pleasure.

"And what, bhikkhu, is inward rottenness? here someone is immoral, one of evil character, of impure and suspect behaviour, secretive in his acts, no ascetic though claiming to be one, not a celibate, though claiming to be one, inwardly rotten, corrupt, depraved..."

BB: Also at:
AN II 239, AN IV 128 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .yaho.html
AN IV 201, UD 52, UD 55

On sunkassarasamacaro, "of suspect behaviour", Spk says: "His conduct is to be recalled with suspicion by others thus, 'it seems he did this and that'; or else he recalls the conduct of others with suspicion thinking, when he sees a few people talking among themselves, 'They must be discussing my faults'." Spk glosses kasambujato as "rubbish-like because of such defilements as lust, etc."
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