SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta — A Pair

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SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta — A Pair

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Apr 29, 2011 4:17 pm

SN 35.93 PTS: S iv 69 CDB ii 1172
Dvaya Sutta: A Pair
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


On the arising of sense-consciousness.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

"It's in dependence on a pair that consciousness comes into play. And how does consciousness come into play in dependence on a pair? In dependence on the eye & forms there arises eye-consciousness. The eye is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Forms are inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Thus this pair is both wavering & fluctuating — inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise.

"Eye-consciousness is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Whatever is the cause, the requisite condition, for the arising of eye-consciousness, that is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Having arisen in dependence on an inconstant factor, how could eye-consciousness be constant?

"The coming together, the meeting, the convergence of these three phenomena is eye-contact. Whatever is the cause, the requisite condition, for the arising of eye-contact, that is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Having arisen in dependence on an inconstant factor, how could eye-contact be constant?

"Contacted, one feels. Contacted, one intends. Contacted, one perceives. These phenomena are both wavering & fluctuating — inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. This is how it's in dependence on a pair that eye-consciousness comes into play.

"In dependence on the ear & sounds there arises ear-consciousness...

"In dependence on the nose & aromas there arises nose-consciousness...

"In dependence on the tongue & flavors there arises tongue-consciousness...

"In dependence on the body & tactile sensations there arises body-consciousness...

"In dependence on the intellect & ideas there arises intellect-consciousness. The intellect is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Ideas are inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Thus this pair is both wavering & fluctuating — inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise.

"Intellect-consciousness is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Whatever is the cause, the requisite condition, for the arising of intellect-consciousness, that is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Having arisen in dependence on an inconstant factor, how could intellect-consciousness be constant?

"The coming together, the meeting, the convergence of these three phenomena is intellect-contact. Whatever is the cause, the requisite condition, for the arising of intellect-contact, that is inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. Having arisen in dependence on an inconstant factor, how could intellect-contact be constant?

"Contacted, one feels. Contacted, one intends. Contacted, one perceives. These phenomena are both wavering & fluctuating — inconstant, changeable, of a nature to become otherwise. This is how it's in dependence on a pair that intellect-consciousness comes into play."
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Re: SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta — A Pair

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Apr 29, 2011 4:33 pm

SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta

Translated by Bhikkhu Ñanananda


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... passage-21

"Owing to a dyad, monks, consciousness comes into being. And how, monks, does consciousness come into being owing to a dyad?

"Owing to the eye and forms arises eye-consciousness. The eye is impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' Forms are impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' Thus this dyad is fleeting and transient; impermanent, changing and 'becoming-otherwise.' That cause, that condition, that gives rise to eye-consciousness — that also is impermanent, changing, becoming-otherwise.' And how, monks, could eye consciousness, having arisen dependent on an impermanent condition, become permanent? Now the coming-together, the falling together, the meeting-together, of these three things: this, monk, is called 'eye-contact.' Eye-contact, too, is impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' And how, monks, could eye-contact, having arisen dependent on an impermanent condition, become permanent? Contacted, monks, one feels. Contacted, one intends. Contacted, one perceives. Thus these states also are fleeting and transient; impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.'

"Owing to the ear and sounds arises ear-consciousness. The ear is impermanent...

"Owing to the nose and scents arises nose-consciousness. The nose is impermanent...

"Owing to the tongue and savors arises tongue-consciousness...The tongue is impermanent.

"Owing to the body and tangibles arises body-consciousness. The body is impermanent...

"Owing to the mind and ideas arises mind-consciousness. The mind is impermanent...contacted, monks, one feels. Contacted, one intends. Contacted, one perceives. Thus these states also are fleeting and transient; impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.'

"Thus, monks, consciousness comes into being owing to a dyad."[64]


Note

[64] The doctrinal importance of this 'dyad' may well be gauged by the Buddha's declaration with reference to it in the preceding sutta (XXV. 92.): "Whoever, monks, should say — 'Rejecting this dyad, I will proclaim another dyad' — it would be mere talk on his part, and when questioned, he would not make good his boast, and further, would come to an ill pass. Why so? Because, monks, it would be beyond his scope."
http://awake.kiev.ua/dhamma/tipitaka/2S ... ggo-e.html

Now the following verse of the Dhp.(v. 384) has a reference to dyads:
'yadaa dvayesu dhammesu — paaraguu hoti braahmano athassa sabbe sa.myogaa — attha.m gacchanti jaanato'

'When the arahant becomes 'one who has gone beyond' (paaraguu) with regard to the things forming the dyads, then all fetters of the knowing-one pass away.'
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .budd.html

The commentary (Dhp. A.) takes the dyads to mean 'calm-and-insight' ('dvayesuuti dvidhaa .thitesu samatha-vipassanaa dhammesu...'). However, on the strength of the Buddha's declaration cited above, it is more reasonable to interpret it in the light of the present sutta. The word 'paaraguu' (lit. 'crossed to the further shore') in the verse, may be taken as an illusion to the 'Ocean-sutta' at S. IV 157. [http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nanananda/wheel183.html#passage-4] (See above. Note 17 [http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nanananda/wheel183.html#fn-17]), which compares each of the six senses to an ocean with its respective object as its 'force (of waves), and speaks of the arahant as one who has 'crossed over and gone beyond.'

A distinction has to be made between this 'dyad' (dvaya.m) and the 'dichotomy' (dvayataa) which is the theme in the Dvayataanupassana sutta of the sutta Nipaata, since the latter is set out in the form of contrasts (e.g., "'Whatever suffering arises, all that is due to ignorance' — this is one mode of contemplation: 'from the utter fading away and cessation of that very ignorance, there is no arising of suffering' — this is the second mode of contemplation" — (Sn. P. 141).
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
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Re: SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta — A Pair

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Apr 30, 2011 2:38 am

The sequence in this Sutta seems to me to be related to MN 18
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"Dependent on eye & forms, eye-consciousness arises. The meeting of the three is contact. With contact as a requisite condition, there is feeling. What one feels, one perceives (labels in the mind). What one perceives, one thinks about. What one thinks about, one objectifies. Based on what a person objectifies, the perceptions & categories of objectification assail him/her with regard to past, present, & future forms cognizable via the eye.
...

Whereas in SN 35.93 we have:
""Owing to the eye and forms arises eye-consciousness. The eye is impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' Forms are impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' Thus this dyad is fleeting and transient; impermanent, changing and 'becoming-otherwise.' That cause, that condition, that gives rise to eye-consciousness — that also is impermanent, changing, becoming-otherwise.' And how, monks, could eye consciousness, having arisen dependent on an impermanent condition, become permanent? Now the coming-together, the falling together, the meeting-together, of these three things: this, monk, is called 'eye-contact.' Eye-contact, too, is impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.' And how, monks, could eye-contact, having arisen dependent on an impermanent condition, become permanent? Contacted, monks, one feels. Contacted, one intends. Contacted, one perceives. Thus these states also are fleeting and transient; impermanent, changing, 'becoming-otherwise.'

Different aspects of the problems that arise in the dependent origination sequence...

:anjali:
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Re: SN 35.93: Dvaya Sutta — A Pair

Postby mikenz66 » Tue May 03, 2011 9:32 am

From Bhikkhu Bodhi and Commentary.

"The eye is impermanent ... Thus this dyad is moving and tottering, impermanent, changing, becoming otherwise."

Spk: It moves and totters bacause it does not remain stable in it's own nature.
Spk-pt: ... it trembles because of ageing and death.


"Contacted, bhikkhus, one feels, contacted one intends, contacted one perceives."

BB: Phuttho bhikkhave vededti phuttho ceteti phuttho sanjanati.
This shows the three aggregates of feeling, volitional formations, and perceptions respectively. Thus in regard to each physical sense base, all five aggregates are introduced: the sense base and its object belong to the aggregate of form; the corresponding conciousness to the aggregate of conciousness; and the other three aggregates arise from contact. In the case of the mind base, the physical basis of mind (vatthurupa) and, in certain cases, the object are the form aggregate.
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