SN 35.63 Migajala Sutta

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SN 35.63 Migajala Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:14 am

SN 35.63 PTS: S iv 35 CDB ii 1150
Migajala Sutta: To Migajala
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


Why is true solitude so hard to find? The Buddha explains why, no matter where you go, your most annoying companions always tag along.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

At Savatthi. Then Ven. Migajala went to the Blessed One and on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "'A person living alone. A person living alone,' thus it is said. To what extent, lord, is one a person living alone, and to what extent is one a person living with a companion?"

"Migajala, there are forms cognizable via the eye — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing — and a monk relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them. As he relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them, delight arises. There being delight, he is impassioned. Being impassioned, he is fettered. A monk joined with the fetter of delight is said to be a person living with a companion.

"There are sounds cognizable via the ear... aromas cognizable via the nose... flavors cognizable via the tongue... tactile sensations cognizable via the body... ideas cognizable via the intellect — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing — and a monk relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them. As he relishes them, welcomes them, & remains fastened to them, delight arises. There being delight, he is impassioned. Being impassioned, he is fettered. A monk joined with the fetter of delight is said to be a person living with a companion.

"A person living in this way — even if he frequents isolated forest & wilderness dwellings, with an unpopulated atmosphere, lying far from humanity, appropriate for seclusion — is still said to be living with a companion. Why is that? Because craving is his companion, and it has not been abandoned by him. Thus he is said to be a person living with a companion.

"Now, there are forms cognizable via the eye — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing — and a monk does not relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them. As he doesn't relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them, delight ceases. There being no delight, he is not impassioned. Being not impassioned, he is not fettered. A monk disjoined from the fetter of delight is said to be a person living alone.

"There are sounds cognizable via the ear... aromas cognizable via the nose... flavors cognizable via the tongue... tactile sensations cognizable via the body... ideas cognizable via the intellect — agreeable, pleasing, charming, endearing, fostering desire, enticing — and a monk does not relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them. As he doesn't relish them, welcome them, or remain fastened to them, delight ceases. There being no delight, he is not impassioned. Being not impassioned, he is not fettered. A monk disjoined from the fetter of delight is said to be a person living alone.

"A person living in this way — even if he lives near a village, associating with monks & nuns, with male & female lay followers, with kings & royal ministers, with sectarians & their disciples — is still said to be living alone. A person living alone is said to be a monk. Why is that? Because craving is his companion, and it has been abandoned by him. Thus he is said to be a person living alone."
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Re: SN 35.63 Migajala Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:15 am

Migajaalena Sutta: Migajaala Dwelling Alone
translated from the Pali by Maurice O'Connell Walshe


[At Saavatthii the Ven. Migajaala said to the Buddha:] "Dwelling alone, Lord, dwelling alone, it is said: How far, Lord, does one dwell alone, and to what extent does one dwell with a mate?"[1]

"There are, Migajaala, objects cognizable by the eye — attractive, pleasing, charming, agreeable, enticing, lust-inspiring. And if a monk takes pleasure in them, welcomes them, persists in clinging to them, then because of this taking pleasure, welcoming and persistent clinging, enjoyment comes, and from enjoyment, infatuation. Infatuation brings bondage, and a monk who is trapped in the bondage of enjoyment is called 'one who dwells with a mate'... ear... nose... tongue... body...[2] mind... and a monk who is trapped in the bondage of enjoyment is called 'one who dwells with a mate.' And a monk so dwelling, Migajaala, even though he may frequent jungle glades and remote forest-dwellings, free from noise, with little sound, far from the madding crowd,[3] undisturbed by men, well fitted for seclusion — still he is termed 'one who dwells with a mate.' Why is this? Craving is the mate he has not left behind, and therefore he is called 'one who dwells with a mate.'

"But, Migajaala, there are objects cognizable by the eye... ear... nose... tongue... body... mind — attractive, pleasing, charming, agreeable, enticing, lust-inspiring. And if a monk takes no pleasure in them, does not welcome them, does not persist in clinging to them, then, because of his not taking pleasure, not welcoming them and not persisting in clinging to them, enjoyment fades away, and without enjoyment there is no infatuation. Without infatuation no bondage is generated, and the monk who is freed from the bondage of enjoyment is called 'one who dwells alone.'

"And a monk so dwelling, Migajaala, even though he may live near a village crowded with monks and nuns, male and female lay-followers, kings and royal ministers, sectarians and their followers — still he is termed 'one who dwells alone.' Why is this so? Craving is the mate he has left behind, and therefore he is called one who dwells alone."


Notes

1. Sadutiyo: lit. "with a second."

2. As the organ of touch and tactile sensations.

3. Vijana-vaataani, hardly Woodward's "free from the breath (vaata) of crowds," but rather "pervaded by loneliness" (PED [Pali-English Dictionary, by T.W. Rhys Davids & William Stede, PTS 1921-25]).
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Re: SN 35.63 Migajala Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Mar 14, 2011 7:10 pm

Hmm, not much discussion on this Sutta.

Perhaps the intention is to deflate the conceit of those who think they are practising well by merely physically withdrawing from the world?

:anjali:
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