SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta -- SN 1.70 World

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SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta -- SN 1.70 World

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:35 am

SN 1.61 SN 6 Nāma Name
Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

http://suttacentral.net/sn1.61/en

“What has weighed down everything?
What is most extensive?
What is the one thing that has
All under its control?”

“Name has weighed down everything;
Nothing is more extensive than name.
Name is the one thing that has
All under its control.” [121]

Note

[121] In pāda a, I read addhabhavi with Be and Ee1 & 2, as against anvabhavi in Se. Addhabhavi is aorist of adhibhavati, to overcome, to overpower; see CPD, s.v. addhabhavati. Spk: There is no living being or entity that is free from a name, whether the name be natural or fabricated. Even a tree or stone with no known name is still called “the nameless one.”

SN 1.62 SN 62 Citta Mind
http://suttacentral.net/sn1.62/en

"By what is the world led around?
By what is it dragged here and there?
What is the one thing that has
All under its control?”

“The world is led around by mind;
By mind it’s dragged here and there.
Mind is the one thing that has
All under its control.” [122]

Note

[122] The verb in pāda b is passive. Spk to v. 246 glosses the active parikassati as parikaḍḍhati, to drag around. Spk: Those who come under the control of the mind are subjected to total obsession. Spk-pṭ: The sutta speaks of those who have not fully understood reality. But those who have fully understood the aggregates and abandoned the defilements do not come under control of the mind; rather, it is the mind that comes under their control.
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Re: SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:38 am

SN 1.61 Nama Name
Translated by Bhikkhu Nanananda

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... #passage-5

What is it that overwhelmed[18] everything?
What is it that nought else excels?
What is it that to which one thing
Everything else its course doth bend?

'Tis name that has overwhelmed everything
Nought else exists that excels name
And Name itself is that one thing
Beneath whose sway all others came.[19]

Notes

[18] 'addhabhavi' v. l. 'anvabhavi': The verb being in the active voice, is probably a derivation from 'adhi + √ bhuu' (Cf. 'maa vo kodho ajjhabhavi'; 'Let no anger overwhelm you' — S. I. 240). The other possible derivation, 'addha + bhu' yielding the meaning, 'soiled or wet,' is less plausible in this context.

[19.] The Sutta highlights the power of 'name.' Everything comes under its sway. The Comm. observes: 'There is no being or formation without a name, whether this be attached primordially or by convention. Even when people do not know a particular tree or stone by this or that name, it will still be called a 'no-namer' (anaamako).' This over-riding power of name has been recognized by Lao-tse too, when he calls it the 'mother of all things.' In magic, one's knowledge of the secret names of spirits is deemed a weapon effective in itself against their evil influence. In panegyric, the ability to muster a wide range of epithets is considered a rewarding skill.
Everything comes under the sway of name as a result of man's urge to familiarize himself with the world. Sorting out, naming and defining things, are practical necessities in ordinary life, since they help us avoid 'tripping-over,' just as in the case of one groping in the dark. There is a constant need to re-cognize things and the easiest way of doing it, is by putting a sign on them. While the five senses have their own separate modes of indentation, mind largely relies on the labeling-mode of attaching a name, in the course of its own groping. Since mind partakes of the 'range' (visaya) and pasture (gocara) of the other five senses as well (M. I. 295, MN 43), its own mode of indentation has a preponderating influence over the rest. Thus, perceptual data of the five external senses, in all their permutations and combinations, finally come to be assigned names and pigeon-holed as 'things.' This convenient but superficial indentation beclouds the mind and prevents the immediate understanding of sense-contact (phassa). Its mode of apperception, therefore, is largely a process of 'imagining' and 'figuring-out' of objects located in the darkness of ignorance, and in its blind groping, the phenomenon of sense-contact as such, hardly receives any serious attention.

The over-riding power of name could only be nullified by the process of 'attending-by-way-of-matrix' (yoniso manasikaara) in order to understand the very structure of sense-experience. By comprehending the phenomenon of sense-contact for what it is, the imaginary world of 'things' will cease to obsess the mind. When the light of wisdom is turned on, there will be no 'groping-in-the-dark,' and consequently, no necessity to imagine or 'figure-out' things, for one now 'knows and sees' for oneself that there is 'No-thing.' ('Jaanato passato natthi ki~ncana.m' — Ud. 80: 'Naught for him who knows and sees.').
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Re: SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:43 am

SN 1.62 Citta The Mind
Translated by Bhikkhu Nanananda

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... #passage-6

What is it that whereby the world is led?
What is it that whereby 'tis being dragged?
And what is it that in whose sole sway
One and all have come to stay?

By mind[20] is it that the world is led.
By mind is it that the world is dragged
And mind is it in whose sole sway
One and all have come to stay.

Note

[20] 'World' is defined in Buddhism directly with reference to the six senses: "That by which one is conscious of the world, by which one has conceit of the world — that is called 'world' in the Noble One's discipline. And through what is one conscious of the world? Through what has one conceit of the world? Through the eye, friends, through the ear, the nose, the tongue, the body and the mind..." (S. IV. 95, SN 35.116).
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Re: SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:56 am

The next sutta we looked at 2 weeks ago:
SN 1.63 Tanha

Together they form a group.

Bhikkhu Bodhi's translations on Sutta Central give the whole Vagga
http://suttacentral.net/search?query=sn+1.61 etc...

VII Weighed Down

61. Name

“What has weighed down everything?
What is most extensive?
What is the one thing that has
All under its control?” [121]

“Name has weighed down everything;
Nothing is more extensive than name.
Name is the one thing that has
All under its control.”

62. Mind

“By what is the world led around?
By what is it dragged here and there?
What is the one thing that has
All under its control?”

“The world is led around by mind;
By mind it’s dragged here and there.
Mind is the one thing that has
All under its control.” [122]

63. Craving

“By what is the world led around?
By what is it dragged here and there?
What is the one thing that has
All under its control?”

“The world is led around by craving;
By craving it‘s dragged here and there.
Craving is the one thing that has
All under its control.”

64. Fetter

“By what is the world tightly fettered?
What is its means of travelling about?
What is it that one must forsake
In order to say, ‘Nibbana’?”

“The world is tightly fettered by delight;
Thought is its means of travelling about.
Craving is what one must forsake
In order to say, ‘Nibbana.’” [123]

65. Bondage

“By what is the world held in bondage?
What is its means of travelling about?
What is it that one must forsake
To cut off all bondage?”

“The world is held in bondage by delight;
Thought is its means of travelling about.
Craving is what one must forsake
To cut off all bondage.”

66. Afflicted

“By what is the world afflicted?
By what is it enveloped?
By what dart has it been wounded?
With what is it always burning?” [124]

“The world is afflicted with death,
Enveloped by old age;
Wounded by the dart of craving,
It is always burning with desire.”

67. Ensnared

“By what is the world ensnared?
By what is it enveloped?
By what is the world shut in?
On what is the world established?”

“The world is ensnared by craving;
It is enveloped by old age;
The world is shut in by death;
The world is established on suffering.” [125]

68. Shut In

“By what is the world shut in?
On what is the world established?
By what is the world ensnared?
By what is it enveloped?”

“The world is shut in by death;
The world is established on suffering;
The world is ensnared by craving;
It is enveloped by old age.”

69. Desire

“By what is the world bound?
By the removal of what is it freed?
What is it that one must forsake
To cut off all bondage?”

“By desire is the world bound;
By the removal of desire it is freed.
Desire is what one must forsake
To cut off all bondage.”

70. World

“In what has the world arisen?
In what does it form intimacy?
By clinging to what is the world
Harassed in regard to what?”

“In six has the world arisen;
In six it forms intimacy;
By clinging to six the world
Is harassed in regard to six.” [126]

Notes

[121] In pāda a, I read addhabhavi with Be and Ee1 & 2, as against anvabhavi in Se. Addhabhavi is aorist of adhibhavati, to overcome, to overpower; see CPD, s.v. addhabhavati. Spk: There is no living being or entity that is free from a name, whether the name be natural or fabricated. Even a tree or stone with no known name is still called “the nameless one.”

[122] The verb in pāda b is passive. Spk to v. 246 glosses the active parikassati as parikaḍḍhati, to drag around. Spk: Those who come under the control of the mind are subjected to total obsession. Spk-pṭ: The sutta speaks of those who have not fully understood reality. But those who have fully understood the aggregates and abandoned the defilements do not come under control of the mind; rather, it is the mind that comes under their control.

[123] Spk glosses vicāraṇa in pāda b by pādāni, feet, explaining that the singular should be understood as a plural. In doctrinal contexts the cognate vicāra means examination, and is regularly coupled with vitakka to describe the thought process, e.g., in the formula for the first jhāna. Here, however, the point seems to be that thought can travel over vast distances without physical locomotion.

[124] I read with Be, Se, Ee1, and Spk (Be) kissa dhūpāyito, as against kissā dhūmāyito in Ee2, SS, and Spk (Se). The verse is also at Th 448 with dhūpāyito. Norman (at EV I, n. to 448) contends this word means “perfumed” or “obscured (by smoke),” but Spk glosses as āditto; see too v. 542, where padhūpito must mean “burning.”

[125] Spk: The world is ensnared by craving (taṇhāya uḍḍito) because the eye, caught withthe rope of craving, is ensnared on the peg of forms; so too with the ear and ensnared on the peg of forms; so too with the ear and sounds, etc. The world is shut in by death (maccunā pihito): Even though the kamma done in the last life is only one mind-moment away, beings do not know it because they are shut off from it, as if by a mountain, by the strong pains occurring at the time of death.

[126] See above n. 57 [Note to SN 1.30-see below]. Following a suggestion of VĀT, I take upādāya in pāda c to be an absolutive with the literal meaning “clinging,” completed by the finite verb vihaññati in pāda d; loko in v. 221c thus becomes a mere metrical filler. Spk, however, has adopted an alternative solution, supplying a suppressed finite verbandinterpreting upādāya in the extended sense of “depending on” thus: upadaya in the extended sense of “depending on” thus: tāni yeva ca upādāya āgamma paṭicca pavattati; “It occurs dependent on, contingent on, in dependence on them.” Pj II 210,27-28, commenting on Sn 168, takes a similar approach, though with a different finite verb.

    SN 1.30. Antelope Calves
    http://suttacentral.net/sn1.30/en

    “Having approached you, we ask a question
    Of the slender hero with antelope calves,
    Greedless, subsisting on little food,
    Wandering alone like a lion or naga,
    Without concern for sensual pleasures:
    How is one released from suffering?”

    “Five cords of sensual pleasure in the world,
    With mind declared to be the sixth:
    Having expunged desire here,
    One is thus released from suffering.” [57]

    [57] This verse of inquiry occurs at Sn 165-66, though with an additional couplet and with a variant line in place of the actual question. The inquirers there are the two yakkhas, Hemavata and Sātāgira. The question (or rather, string of questions) is posed only at Sn 168 and the reply given at Sn 169; they are identical with the question and reply at vv. 221-22. It is only after receiving this reply that the yakkhas pose the present question, kathaṃ dukkhā pamuccati? , and the answer given is identical. Having antelope calves (eṇijaṅgha) is one of the thirty-two marks of a great man (see DN III 156,5-12; MN II 136,14).

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Re: SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Mar 24, 2014 8:19 am

SN 1.70 The World
Translated by Bhikkhu Nanananda


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... tml#fnt-21

In what has this world arisen?
In what does it hold concourse?
On what depending
— in what respect —
Does this world get oppressed?

In the six the world arose [21]
In the six it holds concourse
On the six themselves depending
In the six it gets oppressed.

Note


[21] 'World' is defined in Buddhism directly with reference to the six senses: "That by which one is conscious of the world, by which one has conceit of the world — that is called 'world' in the Noble One's discipline. And through what is one conscious of the world? Through what has one conceit of the world? Through the eye, friends, through the ear, the nose, the tongue, the body and the mind..." (S. IV. 95). SN 35.116
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Re: SN 1.61 Nama SN 1.62 Citta

Postby pulga » Mon Mar 24, 2014 2:44 pm

[21] 'World' is defined in Buddhism directly with reference to the six senses: "That by which one is conscious of the world, by which one has conceit of the world — that is called 'world' in the Noble One's discipline. And through what is one conscious of the world? Through what has one conceit of the world? Through the eye, friends, through the ear, the nose, the tongue, the body and the mind..." (S. IV. 95)

Yena kho, āvuso, lokasmiṃ lokasaññī hoti lokamānī– ayaṃ vuccati ariyassa vinaye loko.

The quotation Ven. Ñanananda provides isn't very well translated. It should be as per Ven. Bodhi:

That in the world by which one is a perceiver of the world, a conceiver of the world—this is called the world in the Noble One’s Discipline.


http://suttacentral.net/sn35.116/en
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