Everyday practice

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Everyday practice

Postby zamotcr » Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:38 pm

Hello, my name is Michael Zamot and I'm from Costa Rica. We don't have any Theravada community nor temple here, just a few guys who meet over the internet.

I'm starting again with Buddhism and I want to understand better Theravada tradition (still undecided).

I'm not very good meditating, I tried with a cushion without luck and with a self-made meditation bench which almost work for my posture. Now the problem is my mind, I get bored too soon or I just feel relaxed, but what else should I expect, what should happen? I do some kind of meditation when I practice Tang Soo Do, trying to focus on my movement in the forms.

Also, I want to know which other practices may I do, because, apart from the difficulties, I don't always meditate, I tried as much two times per week. So I want to do something else too, because meditating is not enough.

Thanks so much! :anjali:
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby daverupa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 3:39 pm

What sort of meditation method(s) have you learned? What does your effort look like?

It's possible to have some satipatthana with the martial forms, as you say. This may be a good foundation - what sort of experience is this, for you?
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby zamotcr » Thu Dec 05, 2013 4:26 pm

daverupa wrote:What sort of meditation method(s) have you learned? What does your effort look like?

It's possible to have some satipatthana with the martial forms, as you say. This may be a good foundation - what sort of experience is this, for you?


I tried Anapanasati and after ten minutes I want to do something else, I start to feel bored. Sometimes I only feel relaxed, and just that.

For me, focusing on the movements in martial arts has helped me a lot, I do a lot of concentration (ADHD does not make things easier) and this is difficult but I try :)

Apart from meditation, is there any other practice to enhance my mind and my buddhism?
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby bodom » Thu Dec 05, 2013 5:54 pm

zamotcr wrote:Apart from meditation, is there any other practice to enhance my mind and my buddhism?


Practice the five precepts for your own benefit and the benefit of all beings:

"And how is one an individual who practices for his own benefit and for that of others? There is the case where a certain individual himself abstains from the taking of life and encourages others in undertaking abstinence from the taking of life. He himself abstains from stealing and encourages others in undertaking abstinence from stealing. He himself abstains from sexual misconduct and encourages others in undertaking abstinence from sexual misconduct. He himself abstains from lying and encourages others in undertaking abstinence from lying. He himself abstains from intoxicants that cause heedlessness and encourages others in undertaking abstinence from intoxicants that cause heedlessness. Such is the individual who practices for his own benefit and for that of others.


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby daverupa » Thu Dec 05, 2013 6:22 pm

There are a lot of ways to make satipatthana work for you. Anapanasati is one of them, but there are any number of other approaches you might try.

You've probably read a Satipatthana Sutta such as MN 10, but there are a number of subteties about the practice that lets one refine it for their individual temperament.

Beyond the above, I would also recommend reading Analayo's Satipatthana book, which offers a very helpful overview as well as depth discussion of various points.

The precepts, as mentioned above, are indeed a necessary foundation for success here, so that is good advice. One should protect others & protect oneself.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Mkoll » Thu Dec 05, 2013 7:57 pm

zamotcr wrote:I tried Anapanasati and after ten minutes I want to do something else, I start to feel bored. Sometimes I only feel relaxed, and just that.

Examine your motivations for meditating: why are you doing it? If you have a higher goal that you firmly believe in, that might give you enough motivation to dispel the boredom.
Peace,
James
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Alobha » Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:16 pm

zamotcr wrote:I tried Anapanasati and after ten minutes I want to do something else, I start to feel bored. Sometimes I only feel relaxed, and just that.

Hi zamotcr :smile:
I'd suggest that you try sitting for more than 10 minutes. Most things in life need more time than that before one can see the value of it. 20-30 minutes is a more recommendable approach (at least as long as there is no physical pain involved when sitting).

zamotcr wrote:Also, I want to know which other practices may I do, because, apart from the difficulties, I don't always meditate, I tried as much two times per week. So I want to do something else too, because meditating is not enough.

Consider starting with a regular practice of walking meditation for at least a month. It's quite different from sitting as in that you, welll, walk. If you're very energized and prefer some more stimulation, than walking might suit you better.
Apart from that, I'd also recommend the books daverupa mentioned to get a better understanding of what to expect (or rather: not to expect) from meditation.

Best wishes,
Alobha
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby zamotcr » Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:35 pm

Thanks everyone for your comments :)

I got a copy of Analayo book.

I tried meditating 20 minutes in the past and was worse than 10 minutes :zzz: not to mention that I didn't everyday, but two days a week.

Apart from meditation and following the 5 precepts, are there other practices like chanting or give offerings, etc?


:namaste:
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Digity » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:14 am

Meditation is used to develop insight. Have you ever thought to sit through the boredom? Try being with it. It might reveal things about your mind. When things come up with your meditation that you don't like you need to learn to sit with it.
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Mkoll » Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:29 am

zamotcr wrote:Apart from meditation and following the 5 precepts, are there other practices like chanting or give offerings, etc?

Read the suttas and apply your mind to them. Investigate what you do in daily life: is it for the long-term welfare and benefit of yourself and others?

Buddhist practice is a way of living and it should ideally continue after you get up from meditation.

:anjali:
Peace,
James
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby robertk » Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:04 am

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Re: Everyday practice

Postby villkorkarma » Fri Dec 13, 2013 4:22 pm

You have to work with vipassana all your Life in your Daily Life to. not killing, not stealing, not missuse anyone sexually and nothingelse. I dont understand why heedlessness should be dangerous. anyone?
dont hurt anyone in any sort of way
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby villkorkarma » Sat Dec 14, 2013 10:45 am

You dont feel so well if you drink alcohol. drinking alcohol is a scream for help.
dont hurt anyone in any sort of way
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby dhammapal » Wed Dec 18, 2013 7:10 am

zamotcr wrote:I tried Anapanasati and after ten minutes I want to do something else, I start to feel bored. Sometimes I only feel relaxed, and just that.

I have a practice of noticing when it is ten minutes to the hour and doing anapanasati at the computer with my digital watch on the desk in front of me to discern the length of the breathing and decide on a rhythm.
zamotcr wrote:Apart from meditation, is there any other practice to enhance my mind and my buddhism?

I recommend the Buddha's Instructions to Rahula (also read aloud), reflecting before, during and after bodily, verbal and mental actions. And choose your favorite good deed from the past and keep recollecting it so it will be in your mind when you die.

With metta / dhammapal.
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Taijitu » Thu Dec 19, 2013 10:03 am

Good karma lead me to getting a lift in a friend's car yesterday.

We talked about meditation and he told me that he had never felt the need to meditate.

We talked further and he pointed out a picture in a shop window that looked like one he had painted himself.

I asked him if he felt that painting was his meditation.

He answered that yes he felt it was.

He strikes me as a calm, loving and well rounded person that I am happy to call a friend (just because he has a car and I don't :lol:).
http://www.dhammawheel.com/chat/
Unfettered at last, a traveling monk,
I pass the old Zen barrier.
Mine is a traceless stream-and-cloud life,
Of these mountains, which shall be my home?
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Aloka » Sat Dec 21, 2013 12:37 pm

zamotcr wrote:I'm not very good meditating, I tried with a cushion without luck and with a self-made meditation bench which almost work for my posture. Now the problem is my mind, I get bored too soon or I just feel relaxed, but what else should I expect, what should happen?


Hello zamotcr,

Some people find this little beginners meditation booklet very helpful. Its by Ajahn Amaro the abbot of the UK Amaravati Monastery.

http://www.amaravati.org/downloads/pdf/finding_the_missing_peace.pdf

Kind regards,

Aloka
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby binocular » Sat Dec 21, 2013 1:34 pm

zamotcr wrote:Apart from meditation and following the 5 precepts, are there other practices like chanting or give offerings, etc?

You could try cultivating the ten perfections.

http://www.dhammatalks.org/Archive/Writ ... ctions.pdf -

"For people in the modern world who are wrestling with the issue of how to practice the Dhamma in daily life, the perfections provide a useful framework for developing a fruitful attitude toward daily activities so that any activity or relationship undertaken wisely with the primary purpose of developing the perfections in a balanced way becomes part of the practice.

The perfections also provide one of the few reliable ways of measuring the accomplishments of one's life. "Accomplishments" in the realm of work and relationships have a way of turning into dust, but perfections of the character, once developed, are dependable and lasting, carrying one over and beyond the vicissitudes of daily living. Thus they deserve to take high priority in the way we plan our lives. These two facts are reflected in the two etymologies offered for the word perfection (paramī): They carry one across to the further shore (paraṃ); and they are of foremost (parama) importance in formulating the purpose of one's life."
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Taijitu » Sun Dec 22, 2013 5:25 pm

binocular wrote:
zamotcr wrote:Apart from meditation and following the 5 precepts, are there other practices like chanting or give offerings, etc?

You could try cultivating the ten perfections.

http://www.dhammatalks.org/Archive/Writ ... ctions.pdf -

"For people in the modern world who are wrestling with the issue of how to practice the Dhamma in daily life, the perfections provide a useful framework for developing a fruitful attitude toward daily activities so that any activity or relationship undertaken wisely with the primary purpose of developing the perfections in a balanced way becomes part of the practice.

The perfections also provide one of the few reliable ways of measuring the accomplishments of one's life. "Accomplishments" in the realm of work and relationships have a way of turning into dust, but perfections of the character, once developed, are dependable and lasting, carrying one over and beyond the vicissitudes of daily living. Thus they deserve to take high priority in the way we plan our lives. These two facts are reflected in the two etymologies offered for the word perfection (paramī): They carry one across to the further shore (paraṃ); and they are of foremost (parama) importance in formulating the purpose of one's life."


Thank you. This is very helpful.
http://www.dhammawheel.com/chat/
Unfettered at last, a traveling monk,
I pass the old Zen barrier.
Mine is a traceless stream-and-cloud life,
Of these mountains, which shall be my home?
Manan (1591-1654)
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Re: Everyday practice

Postby Floor » Tue Jan 07, 2014 6:29 pm

zamotcr wrote:Thanks everyone for your comments :)

I got a copy of Analayo book.

I tried meditating 20 minutes in the past and was worse than 10 minutes :zzz: not to mention that I didn't everyday, but two days a week.

Apart from meditation and following the 5 precepts, are there other practices like chanting or give offerings, etc?


:namaste:


You want the lazy way to enlightenment? :)

Sorry, only meditation will take you there. Getting bored after 10 minutes is COMPLETELY normal. We all start with this hectic mind and after a lot of practice it calms down. Start at 20 minutes, then 20 minutes twice a day, then more time ect ect.

Meditation is the only way, suck it up.
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