Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

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Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby Tom » Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:58 am

Is there a specific sequential order in which one must pratice/learn the dhamma in order to reach the final goal? If so, what is this order?
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby jcprice » Wed Nov 28, 2012 2:08 pm

Hi ccharles,

what you may be looking for is what is referred to as the Gradual Training.

Access to Insight has a good introductory article on the topic.

At a high level, the key steps in practice are:
1. Cultivation of generosity.
2. Cultivation of morality (ie 5 Precepts)
2. Practice of the Noble Eightfold Path (this will take you to the final goal).
Each stage lays foundations for the next.

Each of the stages is supported by relevant understanding (loosely):
1. Kamma
2. Rebirth
3. Four Noble Truths

Ideally, the real first step is to seek out a teacher.

I hope this is helpful.

With metta,

Jason
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby Javi » Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:24 pm

As far as textual study, In the Buddha's word by Bhikkhu Bodhi does a great job of introducing the major concepts of dhamma.
:anjali:
Non qui parum habet sed qui plus cupit pauper est.
It's not he who has little, but he who craves more, that is poor. - Seneca
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby ignobleone » Sun Dec 02, 2012 3:49 am

ccharles wrote:Is there a specific sequential order in which one must pratice/learn the dhamma in order to reach the final goal? If so, what is this order?

A rare and very good question. Not many ask this, yet it's very important to keep in mind.

In term of learning phase, there are three phases:
1. Pariyatti: learn the text
2. Patipatti: put into practice
3. Pativeda: come to realization

As for the curriculum, I'd like to add more to what jcprice has said.
1. Saddha
2. Sila (including Dana)
3. Sati
4. Samadhi & Panna
All of those are elaborated in the Noble Eightfold Path.

Also there are some Buddhism basics you should know: (not necessarily in this sequence)
- Nibbana (the Final Goal in Buddhism)
- Tilakhana
- Kamma & Punarbhava
- Cattari Ariya Saccani
- Paticcasamuppada
- Tiratana
- Ariya Pugala
- Pancakhanda
- Buddhist cosmology

Knowing the pali/sanskrit terms is also part of the learning process.
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby Bakmoon » Mon Dec 03, 2012 12:50 am

ccharles wrote:Is there a specific sequential order in which one must pratice/learn the dhamma in order to reach the final goal? If so, what is this order?


Good question! I don't think that a specific order is actually nessisary to learn in, but going in a particular order can be very helpful. Two works that I have read through and really liked are:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... efuge.html
This links to a really good anthology of texts on a variety of subjects that I think give a comprehensive bird's eye view of the Buddha's teaching. It really shows how everything in the Buddha's teaching really fits together into a complete whole. I would recommend it to anyone, beginner or advanced.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... toend.html
This links to the Ven. Bikkhu Bodhi's work on the Noble Eightfold Path. It is one of the first things I read as a Buddhist and I think it is still one of the most helpful things to read when trying to get a big picture understanding of the practical side of the Buddha's teachings. I highly recommend this book too.
The non-doing of any evil,
The performance of what's skillful,
The cleansing of one's own mind:
This is the Buddhas' teaching.
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby Tom » Mon Dec 03, 2012 11:25 pm

Are there any suttas where the Buddha discusses pariyatti?
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:19 am

ccharles wrote:Are there any suttas where the Buddha discusses pariyatti?

Since there were no texts, it won't be expressed as "learn the text", but I think this is the sort of thing that it covers:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"But what quality is most helpful for penetrating the meaning?..."

"Remembering the Dhamma... If one didn't remember the Dhamma, one wouldn't penetrate the meaning..."

"But what quality is most helpful for remembering the Dhamma?... "

"Hearing the Dhamma... If one didn't hear the Dhamma, one wouldn't remember the Dhamma..."

"But what quality is most helpful for hearing the Dhamma?... "

"Lending ear... If one didn't lend ear, one wouldn't hear the Dhamma..."

"But what quality is most helpful for lending ear?... "

:anjali:
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby Tom » Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:30 pm

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
When, on observing that the monk is purified with regard to qualities based on aversion, he next observes him with regard to qualities based on delusion: 'Are there in this venerable one any such qualities based on delusion that, with his mind overcome by these qualities, he might say, "I know," while not knowing, or say, "I see," while not seeing; or that he might urge another to act in a way that was for his/her long-term harm & pain?' As he observes him, he comes to know, 'There are in this venerable one no such qualities based on delusion... His bodily behavior & verbal behavior are those of one not deluded. And the Dhamma he teaches is deep, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. This Dhamma can't easily be taught by a person who's deluded.
How does one correctly assess whether a monk is deluded or not?
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby nekete » Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:11 pm

Javi wrote:As far as textual study, In the Buddha's word by Bhikkhu Bodhi does a great job of introducing the major concepts of dhamma.
:anjali:


I was interested in this link but I think it doesn' t work. Do you another link for these Buddha's word?
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Re: Order of Learning/Practicing Dhamma

Postby alan... » Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:47 am

ccharles wrote:Is there a specific sequential order in which one must pratice/learn the dhamma in order to reach the final goal? If so, what is this order?



there are many answers to this question. unfortunately there is not so much as one solid answer to be found in the suttas as they are arranged by length, not by progression of training. however i believe the eightfold path is a progression:

1 right view: learn to see things in terms of the truths (and by extension anicca, dukkha and anatta). doing this makes one motivated to seek more knowledge. we also circle back here once we reach the end as this is also the step involved in developing wisdom.

2 right intention (or right thought): intention to complete the training. thoughts of non ill will, thoughts of renunciation, and so on. getting your mind straight and on the right path keeps pushing you along. also for developing wisdom.

3 right speech: this is morality obviously. perfecting the way one speaks, no harsh speech, lies, gossip or curse words, etc. saying pleasant things and helpful things. perfecting your speech will make everything in your life go smoother making practice easier and even promoting it.

4 right action: again, morality (seeing the progression?), no harming any sentient being in any way. also no hurting yourself, this includes intoxicants. helping others. same as above, doing good, taking care of your health and mind will make you ready for further practice.

5 right livelihood: if you work it cannot be a job that makes you break any of these other rules. specific no nos are: poison trader, meat trader, living being trader, weapons trader and intoxicants trader. making sure you have an appropriate job will make the whole path much more fruitful.

6 right effort: making the time and effort to do the things in the path. helping others. meditating. going to see your teacher. planning out time to read suttas. stuff like that and a lot more. actually getting down to business! you are moving right along into the far reaches of the practice.

7 right mindfulness: paying attention to what you are doing mindfully as prescribed in the suttas, also applies to meditation. practicing this is crucial to the path and it's ten times stronger and easier if you're working on fulfilling the previous steps.

8 right concentration: jhana meditation and some say access concentration or other types of meditation but jhana is the most common definition given by the buddha. infinitely easier if you have fulfilled all the other steps! if you're a drug dealing, drug addict, thief who cusses people out at random and refuses to even consider the four noble truths (ie: breaking almost all of the rules above...) then when you sit down to meditate you will have SERIOUS difficulty. however if you've fulfilled all of the above you will slide right along!

so this really is a progression on it's own. the eightfold path is all inclusive and you can just keep adding to each step as everything can be put under one of the headings. the main choices are what meditation subjects and stuff like that.
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