Abhidhamma View: Kayagatasati

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Abhidhamma View: Kayagatasati

Postby yawares » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:12 pm

Dear Members,

:candle: Abhidhamma View:Kayagatasati :candle:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ sariputtadhamma/JTN]

Vism. p. 236-238 (excerpt):

42. ... It has been commended by the Blessed One in various ways in different suttas thus:Bhikkhus, when one thing is developed and repeatedly practiced, it leads to a supreme sense of urgency, to supreme benefit, to supreme surcease of bondage, to supreme mindfulness and full awareness, to acquisition of knowledge and vision, to a happy life here and now, to realization of the fruit of clear vision and deliverance. What is that one thing? It is mindfulness occupied with the body” (A I 43).And how developed, bhikkhus, how repeatedly practiced is mindfulness occupied with the body of great fruit, of great benefit? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, gone to the forest (M III 89), that is to say, the sections on breathing, on postures, on the four kinds of full awareness, on attention directed to repulsiveness, on attention directed to elements, and on the nine charnel-ground contemplations.

43. Herein, the three, that is to say, the sections on postures, on the four kinds of full awareness, and on attention directed to elements, as they are stated [in that sutta], deal with insight. Then the nine sections on the charnelground contemplations, as stated there, deal with that particular phase of insight knowledge called contemplation of danger. And any development of concentration in the bloated, etc., that might be implied there has already been explained in the Description of Foulness (Ch. VI). So there are only the two, that is, the sections on breathing and on directing attention to repulsiveness, that, as stated there, deal with concentration. Of these two, the section on breathing is a separate meditation subject, namely, mindfulness of breathing.

44. What is intended here as mindfulness occupied with the body is the thirtytwo aspects. This meditation subject is taught as the direction of attention to repulsiveness thus: Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reviews this body, up from the soles of the feet and down from the top of the hair and contained in the skin, as full of many kinds of filth thus: In this body there are head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidney, heart, liver, midriff, spleen, lungs, bowels, entrails, gorge, dung, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, spittle, snot, oil of the joints, and urine (M III 90), the brain being included in the bone marrow in this version [with a total of only thirty-one aspects].

45. Here is the description of the development introduced by a commentary on the text.
This body: this filthy body constructed out of the four primary elements. Up from the soles of the feet: from the soles of the feet upwards. Down from the top of the hair: from the highest part of the hair downwards. Contained in the skin: terminated all round by the skin. Reviews as full of many kinds of filth: he sees that this body is packed with the filth of various kinds beginning with head hairs. How? In this body there are head hairs, urine.

46. Herein, there are means, there are found. In this: in this, which is expressed thus: Up from the soles of the feet and down from the top of the hair and contained in the skin, as full of many kinds of filth. Body: the carcass; for it is the carcass that is called 'body' (kaaya) because it is a conglomeration of filth, because such vile (kucchita) things as the head hairs, etc., and the hundred diseases beginning with eye disease, have it as their origin (aaya).
Head hairs, body hairs: these things beginning with head hairs are the thirty two aspects. The construction here should be understood in this way: In this body there are head hairs, in this body there are body hairs.

49. 1. This meditation subject consists in giving attention to repulsiveness. Even if one is master of the Tipi.taka, the verbal recitation should still be done at the time of first giving it attention. For the meditation subject only becomes evident to some through recitation, as it did to the two elders who learned the meditation subject from the Elder Mahaa Deva of the Hill Country (Malaya). On being asked for the meditation subject, it seems, the elder gave the text of the thirty-two aspects, saying,'Do only this recitation for four months.'

Although they were familiar respectively with two and three Pi.takas, it was only at the end of four months of recitation of the meditation subject that they became stream-enterers, with right apprehension [of the text]. So the teacher who expounds the meditation subject should tell the pupil to do the recitation verbally first.

50. Now, when he does the recitation, he should divide it up into the skin pentad, etc., and do it forwards and backwards. After saying head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, he should repeat it backwards, Skin, teeth, nails, body hairs, head hairs.

51. Next to that, with the kidney pentad, after saying Flesh, sinews, bones, bone marrow, kidney,” he should repeat it backwards, Kidney, bone marrow, bones, sinews, flesh; skin, teeth, nails, body hairs, head hairs.

56. The recitation should be done verbally in this way a hundred times, a thousand times, even a hundred thousand times. For it is through verbal recitation that the meditation subject becomes familiar, and the mind being thus prevented from running here and there, the parts become evident and seem like [the fingers of] a pair of clasped hands, like a row of fence posts.

57. 2. The mental recitation should be done just as it is done verbally. For the verbal recitation is a condition for the mental recitation, and the mental recitation is a condition for the penetration of the characteristic [of foulness].

144. And the bhikkhu who is devoted to this mindfulness occupied with the body is a conqueror of boredom and delight, and boredom does not conquer him; he dwells transcending boredom as it arises. He is a conqueror of fear and dread, and fear and dread do not conquer him; he dwells transcending fear and dread as they arise. He is one who bears cold and heat who endures arisen bodily feelings that are menacing to life (M III 97); he becomes an obtainer of the four jhaanas based on the colour aspect of the head hairs, etc.; and he comes to penetrate the six kinds of direct-knowledge (see MN 6).

So let a man, if he is wise,
Untiringly devote his days
To mindfulness of body which
Rewards him in so many ways.

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